Skip to Content

Join the 'Blood Disorders' group to help and get support from people like you.

Blood Disorders News

Drones a Safe Way to Transport Blood: Study

Posted 1 day 7 hours ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 9, 2016 – Blood products don't seem to suffer damage when transported by drones, researchers report. The findings lend support to advocates who say that drones could offer a safe, effective and fast way to deliver blood products to accident sites, natural disasters or remote locations. "My vision is that, in the future, when a first responder arrives to the scene of an accident, he or she can test the victim's blood type right on the spot and send for a drone to bring the correct blood product," study first author Dr. Timothy Amukele said in a Johns Hopkins University news release. He is an assistant professor of pathology at the university's School of Medicine in Baltimore. Amukele and his Hopkins colleagues placed large bags of blood products – the size used for transfusion – into a cooler loaded on a drone that was flown 8 to 12 miles at about 328 feet off the ground. ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Anemia, Blood Transfusion, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Blood Cell Transplantation

Gene Therapy Offers Hope to Some Hemophilia Patients

Posted 4 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 6, 2016 – Preliminary research suggests that a single dose of an experimental gene therapy may help patients with hemophilia B. As explained by the National Hemophilia Foundation, hemophilia B is a genetic disorder where people lack a protein needed for blood clotting called factor IX, or that the type of factor IX they produce is defective. The condition can lead to excess bleeding and occurs in about one in every 5,000 births, the foundation said. But researchers said they've never seen a medical treatment boost factor IX to the level seen in the new trial. According to the findings, patients who got the gene therapy were able to stop getting infusions of the clotting factor. "Our goal in this trial was to evaluate the safety of the gene therapy product and secondarily, to determine if we could achieve levels of factor IX that could decrease bleeding events in ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Bleeding Disorder, Hemophilia B, Hemophilia

Another Step Closer to Artificial Blood

Posted 6 days ago by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, Dec. 3, 2016 – Artificial blood stored as a powder could one day revolutionize emergency medicine and provide trauma victims a better chance of survival. Researchers have created an artificial red blood cell that effectively picks up oxygen in the lungs and delivers it to tissues throughout the body. This artificial blood can be freeze-dried, making it easier for combat medics and paramedics to keep on hand for emergencies, said senior researcher Dr. Allan Doctor. He is a critical care specialist at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. "It's a dried powder that looks like paprika, basically," Doctor said. "It can be stored in an IV plastic bag that a medic would carry, either in their ambulance or in a backpack, for a year or more. When they need to use it, they spike the bag with sterile water, mix it, and it's ready to inject right then and there." The ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Bleeding Disorder, Anemia, Blood Transfusion, Diagnosis and Investigation, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Blood Cell Transplantation

U.S. Should Reinforce Blood Supply: Report

Posted 12 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 28, 2016 – The U.S. blood supply system faces financial and other challenges that could lead to blood shortages in the future, a new report contends. For now, however, the system continues to function well, the researchers said. In 2013, more than 14 million units of blood were collected from about 15.2 million people, and 13.2 million units were transfused. But, increased federal government oversight of the blood system may be required to ensure an adequate blood supply and prevent blood shortages, according to the report from the RAND Corporation, a nonprofit research organization. "The U.S. blood system operates effectively, but it is in a state of flux and uncertainty," Andrew Mulcahy, the report's lead author, said in a RAND news release. "Financial pressures, changes in health care practice and technology, and the emergence of external threats such as the Zika virus ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Blood Transfusion, Blood Cell Transplantation

Many Atrial Fibrillation Patients Missing Out on Blood Thinners

Posted 16 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 16, 2016 – Half of patients hospitalized with the heart rhythm disorder atrial fibrillation aren't given blood-thinning drugs that reduce the risk of clots and stroke, a new study finds. Atrial fibrillation, a type of irregular heartbeat, puts people at higher risk for blood clots and stroke, researchers from Duke University said. They analyzed nearly 1.6 million admissions for atrial fibrillation at 812 hospitals across the United States over five years and found that only 46 percent of patients received blood thinners at discharge. "This low rate of [blood thinner] use in hospitalized patients highlights an important opportunity to improve care in atrial fibrillation patients," said study co-author Dr. Sean Pokorney, an electrophysiology fellow at Duke School of Medicine in Durham, N.C. The patients in the study were 40 and older, stayed in the hospital for at least ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Warfarin, Coumadin, Atrial Fibrillation, Xarelto, Eliquis, Prevention of Thromboembolism in Atrial Fibrillation, Rivaroxaban, Apixaban, Arixtra, Jantoven, Fondaparinux, Savaysa, Edoxaban, Anisindione, Arixtra 10 mg/dose, Arixtra 7.5 mg/dose, Dicumarol, Arixtra 5 mg/dose, Miradon

Gene Test May ID Chemo Patients at Risk of Clots: Study

Posted 1 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 1, 2016 – Genetic testing could help identify breast cancer patients at high risk for the formation of blood clots in their veins, new research suggests. This problem, called venous thromboembolism (VTE), is a serious and potentially fatal complication that can occur during cancer treatment, particularly chemotherapy. Because breast cancer is one of the most common cancers, breast cancer patients account for a large number of cancer-related VTE cases, said study author Judith Brand. She's a postdoctoral researcher in the department of medical epidemiology and biostatistics at Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden. Venous thromboembolism is preventable through treatment with an anti-clotting drug. But side effects, such as bleeding, mean this therapy is not routinely used in patients undergoing chemotherapy, the researchers explained. The new study included more than ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Cancer, Warfarin, Coumadin, Breast Cancer, Xarelto, Prostate Cancer, Pradaxa, Lovenox, Eliquis, Lung Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Heparin, Melanoma, Rivaroxaban, Enoxaparin, Fragmin, Apixaban, Clexane, Arixtra

Sleep Apnea May Boost Risk for Post-Op Problems

Posted 17 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 – Sleep apnea may boost the odds of developing two serious health complications following surgery. So, finding out if you have the sleep disorder beforehand – and seeking treatment – could boost your odds for good recovery from surgery, researchers say. The two post-op complications are blood clots in the veins and an irregular heartbeat called atrial fibrillation, according to two new studies. These problems occurred more often among surgical patients who had not yet been diagnosed – and therefore weren't treated – with sleep apnea. Obstructive sleep apnea is characterized by repeated breathing disruptions during sleep. Symptoms include excessive daytime sleepiness, restless sleep and loud snoring – often with periods of silence followed by gasps. More than half of surgery patients who have sleep apnea don't know it, the authors of one new study said. ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Bleeding Disorder, Atrial Fibrillation, Sleep Apnea, Prevention of Thromboembolism in Atrial Fibrillation, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Coagulation Defects and Disorders

C-Section Raises Risk of Blood Clots After Childbirth: Review

Posted 4 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 4, 2016 – Women who have a cesarean section face an increased risk of potentially dangerous blood clots in the legs or lungs following childbirth, a new review confirms. Researchers who analyzed 60 international studies found that women who had a C-section were four times more likely to develop a blood clot than women who delivered vaginally. "Emergency" C-sections – which are done when a vaginal delivery fails – carried the highest risk. Experts said the findings confirm what individual studies have already shown. It has long been clear that pregnancy itself raises a woman's odds of developing blood clots before or in the weeks after delivery. Women who undergo a C-section have an even greater risk – though it's still low, according to the researchers behind the new study. The new study estimates the risk is about three in 1,000. "Even though C-section increases the ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Bleeding Disorder, Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT), Deep Vein Thrombosis, Delivery, Deep Vein Thrombosis - First Event, Deep Vein Thrombosis Prophylaxis after Abdominal Surgery, Deep Vein Thrombosis - Prophylaxis, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Sickle Cell Trait Not Linked to Early Death in Study

Posted 3 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 3, 2016 – New research challenges the long-held belief that people with sickle cell trait, who are born with only a single copy of the sickle cell gene variant, are at risk of premature death. People with the sickle cell gene variant do not have sickle cell disease, a blood disorder that shortens life span and causes sudden episodes of severe pain. People with the disease carry two copies of the gene, one from each parent. In the first-of-its-kind study, researchers followed nearly 48,000 black American soldiers on active duty in the U.S. Army over a four-year period. All had undergone tests for the genetic trait. "What we can say with confidence is that there's no evidence that it increases mortality in this Army population, and that's incredibly reassuring," said study co-author Lianne Kurina. She's an associate professor of medicine at Stanford University School of ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Anemia - Sickle Cell

Roll Up Your Sleeves: Red Cross Says Blood Need 'Urgent'

Posted 26 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 26, 2016 – The American Red Cross says it has an urgent need for blood donations, with less than a five-day supply of blood on hand to help those who need it. "The Red Cross continues to have an emergency need for blood and platelet donors to give now and help save patient lives," Nick Gehrig, communications director for Red Cross Blood Services, said in a news release. The organization noted it first alerted Americans to the need for blood and platelet donations back in early July. And while donation levels did rise, "a critical blood shortage remains," the group said. "At times, blood and platelets are being distributed to hospitals faster than donations are coming in, which impacts the ability to rebuild the blood supply," the Red Cross explained. Right now, the national supply has dipped below the five-day level the Red Cross says it needs to make sure it's ready for ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Anemia, Blood Transfusion, Anemia Associated with Chronic Disease, Blood Cell Transplantation

Is Binge-Watching Hazardous to Your Health?

Posted 26 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 25, 2016 – Binge-watchers, beware: Too much time in front of the TV could boost your risk of death from a blood clot in the lung, researchers warn. A lung blood clot (pulmonary embolism) typically begins as a clot in the leg or pelvis that develops due to inactivity and reduced blood flow. The clot can break free and travel to a lung and lodge in a small blood vessel, posing a serious threat. This new study included more than 86,000 people in Japan, aged 40 to 70. They were asked how many hours they spent watching television and then were followed for 19 years. During that time, 59 participants died of a pulmonary embolism. Compared to those who watched less than 2.5 hours of television a day, the risk of dying from pulmonary embolism increased 70 percent among those who watched 2.5 to 4.9 hours daily. It was 40 percent greater for each additional two hours of television ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT), Pulmonary Embolism, Pulmonary Embolism - First Event, Deep Vein Thrombosis, Deep Vein Thrombosis - First Event, Deep Vein Thrombosis - Recurrent Event, Pulmonary Embolism - Recurrent Event, Deep Vein Thrombosis - Prophylaxis, Coagulation Defects and Disorders

2 New Findings Offer Hope for Those With Severe Hemophilia

Posted 26 May 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 25, 2016 – Two new studies could pave the way to major changes in how doctors treat severe cases of hemophilia – a rare genetic disorder that can cause uncontrolled bleeding. Both studies tackle a key challenge: Up to one-third of children with severe hemophilia develop antibodies against the standard therapy. But one study highlights the value of an old therapy, while the other shows promising early results with an experimental drug. Experts said both should stir discussion among doctors, patients and parents who deal with hemophilia. But they were especially hopeful about the new drug, known as emicizumab. In the United States, about 20,000 people – mostly boys and men – are living with hemophilia, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The disorder is caused by a defect in one of the genes that controls proteins needed for normal blood ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Bleeding Disorder, Anemia, Blood Transfusion, Hemophilia A, Hemophilia, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Hemophilia B, Blood Cell Transplantation, Hemophilia A with Inhibitors

Restoring Blood Flow Beats Exercise for Poor Leg Circulation

Posted 5 May 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, May 5, 2016 – For people with poor circulation in their leg arteries, a medical procedure to restore blood flow may have greater benefits than exercise, preliminary research suggests. People with peripheral artery disease (PAD) experience pain and fatigue while walking. These symptoms develop because poor circulation in the arteries that supply blood to the limbs causes damage and scarring in the muscles, the researchers explained. There is currently no way to reverse the scarring associated with PAD. But a procedure to reopen or bypass blockages in the blood vessels and restore blood flow to the limbs – also known as revascularization – prevents it from getting worse, the researchers said. For the study, the researchers analyzed levels of a protein, called TGF-Beta1, that triggers scarring in patients with severe PAD. The investigators also measured levels of collagen, ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Peripheral Arterial Disease, Coagulation Defects and Disorders

Health Tip: Donating Blood

Posted 2 May 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Typically, you must be at least 17 years old and meet a few health criteria to donate blood. If you're able, it's a great way to help save lives. The American Red Cross offers this advice on what to expect: One blood donation can help save the lives of three other people. The donation procedure is safe and easy. While the donation itself only takes about 10 minutes, expect to be at the donation center for about an hour. Prepare for donation by making sure you're well-hydrated. Eat a nutritious meal, skipping any foods that are high in fat. Make sure your shirt sleeves can be rolled up above the elbows. Bring your driver's license or a donor ID card. If you're 16 and donating in a state that allows it, bring signed parental consent. Also bring a list of any medications you take. If you're feeling sick beforehand, reschedule the donation. Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Bleeding Disorder, Anemia, Blood Transfusion, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Anemia Associated with Chronic Disease, Blood Cell Transplantation

FDA Approves Experimental Zika Test for Blood Donations

Posted 31 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 30, 2016 – An experimental test to check blood donations for the Zika virus has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The decision to allow use of the test in areas with active mosquito-borne transmission of the virus means that collections of whole blood and blood component donations will be able to resume in Puerto Rico, agency officials said. "The availability of an investigational test to screen donated blood for Zika virus is an important step forward in maintaining the safety of the nation's blood supply, especially for those U.S. territories already experiencing active transmission," Dr. Peter Marks, director of the FDA's Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, said Wednesday. "In the future, should Zika virus transmission occur in other areas, blood collection establishments will be able to continue to collect blood and use the ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Bleeding Disorder, Blood Transfusion, Zika Virus Infection, Blood Cell Transplantation

Page 1 2 3 Next

Ask a Question

Further Information

Related Condition Support Groups

Anemia, Bleeding Disorder, Lymphoma, Protein S Deficiency, Leukemia, Protein C Deficiency, Myeloproliferative Disorders, Leukocytosis, Exchange Transfusion, Cryoglobulinemia, Pancytopenia, Hemoglobinopathy, Lymphocytopenia, Pure Red Cell Aplasia

Related Drug Support Groups

Hespan, Hextend, hetastarch