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Bleeding Associated with Coagulation Defect News

Pradaxa Blood Thinner May Beat Warfarin After Bleeding Episode: Study

Posted 8 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 1, 2016 – Use of a blood thinner is routine for many heart patients, but these drugs come with a risk of episodes of excess bleeding. What, if any, anticoagulant (blood thinner) should these patients take after such episodes arise? A new study suggests that the blood thinner Pradaxa (dabigatran) may be a better choice than the standby drug warfarin in these cases. The reason: Pradaxa is less likely than warfarin to cause recurrent bleeding in patients who recently suffered a bleeding stroke or other major bleeding event, the researchers found. "Our results should encourage clinicians to seriously consider resuming anticoagulation among patients who survived a major bleeding event, particularly if the source of bleeding was identified and addressed," said study senior author Dr. Samir Saba. He's associate chief of cardiology at the University of Pittsburgh Heart and ... Read more

Related support groups: Bleeding Disorder, Warfarin, Coumadin, Ischemic Stroke, Xarelto, Pradaxa, Lovenox, Eliquis, Transient Ischemic Attack, Heparin, Rivaroxaban, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Enoxaparin, Fragmin, Apixaban, Clexane, Arixtra, Hep-Pak, Jantoven, Intracranial Hemorrhage

These Medicines Often Send Americans to ERs

Posted 17 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 22, 2016 – An estimated one in 250 Americans lands in the hospital emergency department each year because of a medication-related reaction or problem, a new federal study finds. Among adults 65 and older, the rate is about one in 100, the study authors said. Remarkably, the medicines causing the most trouble haven't changed in a decade, the researchers noted. Blood thinners, diabetes medicines and antibiotics top the list. These drugs accounted for 47 percent of emergency department visits for adverse drug events in 2013 and 2014, according to the analysis. Among older adults, blood thinners, diabetes medicines and opioid painkillers are implicated in nearly 60 percent of emergency department visits for adverse drug events. "The same drugs are causing the most problems," said study co-author Dr. Daniel Budnitz. The study doesn't tease out what went wrong. The reasons ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Suboxone, Oxycodone, Diabetes, Type 2, Back Pain, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Percocet, Tramadol, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Opana, Warfarin, Coumadin, Subutex

Anti-Vaccine Trend Has Parents Shunning Newborns' Vitamin Shot

Posted 6 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 6, 2015 – With the recent U.S. measles outbreak, the issue of vaccine refusal has received growing scrutiny. Now doctors are calling attention to a similar problem: Some parents are shunning the vitamin K shot routinely given to newborns to prevent internal bleeding. The consequences of that choice can be severe, pediatric specialists say. Infants can quickly become deficient in vitamin K, which can lead to dangerous bleeding in the intestines or the brain. "If you refuse the shot, you're rolling the dice with your child's health," said Dr. Robert Sidonio Jr., a hematologist and assistant professor of pediatrics at Emory University in Atlanta. Vitamin K is necessary for normal blood clotting. In older children and adults, bacteria in the gut produce much of the vitamin K the body needs. But that's not the case for infants. And breast milk does not supply enough vitamin K ... Read more

Related support groups: Bleeding Disorder, Delivery, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Bleeding Associated with Coagulation Defect, Vaccination and Prophlaxis

FDA Approves Corifact to Prevent Bleeding in People With Rare Genetic Defect

Posted 21 Feb 2011 by Drugs.com

SILVER SPRING, Md., Feb. 17, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Corifact, the first product intended to prevent bleeding in people with the rare genetic defect congenital Factor XIII deficiency. Patients with congenital Factor XIII deficiency don't make enough Factor XIII, a substance that circulates in the blood and is important for normal clotting. Without treatment, people with the condition are at risk for life-threatening bleeding. Congenital Factor XIII deficiency is rare and affects 1 out of every 3 million to 5 million people in the United States. The deficiency may lead to soft tissue bruising, mucosal bleeding and fatal intracranial bleeding. Newborns with Factor XIII deficiency may have umbilical cord bleeding. "This product helps fill an important need," said Karen Midthun, M.D., director of the FDA's Center for Biologics ... Read more

Related support groups: Bleeding Disorder, Bleeding Associated with Coagulation Defect

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