Skip to Content

Join the 'Benadryl Child Dye Free' group to help and get support from people like you.

Benadryl Child Dye Free News

Health Tip: Make Sleep a Priority

Posted 7 hours ago by Drugs.com

-- Are you sabotaging your own attempts to get more shuteye? The National Sleep Foundation suggests: Identify and correct any unhealthy sleep habits. Instead of checking your smartphone just before bed, do something relaxing, such as meditating. Prepare your bed well before bedtime. Wash and change bedsheets regularly. Read more

Related support groups: Xanax, Sleep Disorders, Klonopin, Insomnia, Clonazepam, Ativan, Ambien, Valium, Fatigue, Lorazepam, Alprazolam, BuSpar, Diazepam, Benadryl, Narcolepsy, Zolpidem, Hydroxyzine, Buspirone, Melatonin, Temazepam

Health Tip: Cutting Out Caffeine?

Posted 4 days ago by Drugs.com

-- If you're not getting enough sleep, you're not alone. But you don't need to turn to caffeine to help you feel less groggy. The National Sleep Foundation recommends: Before bed avoid alcohol, which can affect sleep. Set a sleep schedule, waking and going to sleep at the same time each day. Skip the snooze button. Set the alarm for the time you truly need to wake up. Open the curtains to let in natural sunlight as soon as you wake. Get daily exercise. Eat a nutritious, balanced breakfast. Read more

Related support groups: Xanax, Sleep Disorders, Klonopin, Insomnia, Clonazepam, Ativan, Ambien, Valium, Fatigue, Lorazepam, Alprazolam, BuSpar, Diazepam, Benadryl, Narcolepsy, Zolpidem, Hydroxyzine, Buspirone, Melatonin, Temazepam

The Etiquette of Ahhhchoo!

Posted 6 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 11, 2017 – Sneezing is your body's way of getting rid of nasal invaders like pollen, pet hair or viruses. But while sneezes may be good for you, they can spread germs to others. Texas A&M University Health Science Center researchers offer some suggestions about protecting yourself and everyone else during the sneezing season: Look at the big picture. Be aware that the germs in a sneeze can travel far, potentially more than 10 feet, to land on surfaces where they can live for weeks. Antibacterial wipes can help reduce the risk that you'll touch germs when you make your way around the world each day. Hand hygiene helps. If you cover your sneeze with your hands, make sure to wash them afterward using soap and warm water for at least 30 seconds. Hand sanitizer isn't enough on its own. Otherwise, the germs may take up residence in your hands and spread to other people ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Influenza, Benadryl, Zyrtec, Hydroxyzine, Promethazine, Claritin, Allegra, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Cold Symptoms, Allergic Rhinitis, Phenergan, Hay Fever, Cetirizine, Vistaril, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Flonase

New Guidelines Urge Early Intro to Peanut Products in High-Risk Infants

Posted 12 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 5, 2017 – Babies at increased risk for peanut allergy should have peanut-containing foods added to their diets as early as 4 months of age, new U.S. guidelines suggest. The recommendation comes from the U.S. National Institutes of Health and other expert groups. And it advocates a tactic that might seem counterintuitive: To drastically cut the chances of peanut allergy in high-risk babies, parents should introduce "age-appropriate" forms of peanut products early in life. Researchers said the advice is based on a pivotal clinical trial called LEAP, funded by the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, and first published in 2015. That study turned old thinking about peanut allergies on its head. At one time, doctors recommended complete peanut avoidance for babies and young children at high risk of an allergic reaction. That advice, however, didn't ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Zyrtec, Hydroxyzine, Promethazine, Claritin, Allegra, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Allergic Rhinitis, Phenergan, Hay Fever, Cetirizine, Vistaril, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Epinephrine, Periactin

Many Misuse OTC Sleep Aids: Survey

Posted 19 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 29, 2016 – People struggling with insomnia often turn to non-prescription sleep remedies that may be habit-forming and are only intended for short-term use, according to a new Consumer Reports survey. The survey found that 18 percent of people who said they'd taken such over-the-counter drugs in the past year did so on a daily basis. And 41 percent said they'd taken them for a year or longer. "We were shocked to see so many people taking so many over-the-counter sleep aids, and doing so much longer than they were supposed to," said Lisa Gill, deputy content editor of Consumer Reports Best Buy Drugs. The drugs in question include Advil PM and Tylenol PM – pain relievers or cold formulas that contain sleep aids – as well as straight sleep remedies like Nytol, Simply Sleep, Sominex, Unisom SleepMinis and ZzzQuil, according to the survey. The active sleep aid in all these ... Read more

Related support groups: Insomnia, Benadryl, Diphenhydramine, Tylenol PM, Benadryl Allergy, Advil PM, ZzzQuil, Sominex, Simply Sleep, Q-Dryl, Nytol, Excedrin PM, Diphen, Midol PM, Headache Relief PM, Motrin PM, Triaminic Thin Strips, Sleep Tabs, Acetaminophen/Diphenhydramine, Nightime Sleepaid

Health Tip: Struggling in the Morning?

Posted 23 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

-- If you're groggy in the morning despite getting enough rest, you may have to change your sleep habits. The National Sleep Foundation recommends: Gradually move your bedtime back by 15 minutes each night until you reach a desired time. Set an alarm to remind you when it's time to go to bed. In the late evening, avoid bright light. That means no TV, no cell phone, tablet and other screens. Turn off bright lights, and keep the room dim to prep your body for bed. As soon as you wake, open the blinds to let in natural sunlight. If it's still dark, turn on the lights. Avoid the urge to sleep later on weekends. If you do want to sleep later, keep it to no more than an hour. Read more

Related support groups: Xanax, Sleep Disorders, Klonopin, Insomnia, Clonazepam, Ativan, Ambien, Valium, Fatigue, Lorazepam, Alprazolam, BuSpar, Diazepam, Benadryl, Zolpidem, Hydroxyzine, Buspirone, Melatonin, Temazepam, Diphenhydramine

Exercise May Be Real Medicine for Parkinson's Disease

Posted 22 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 22, 2016 – Almost any exercise is good medicine for someone with Parkinson's disease, a new study confirms. Although physical activity may seem impossible for some Parkinson's patients, the new research review reaffirms what many specialists already believe: that exercise can have a long-term impact, improving gait and reducing risk of falls, in particular. "I pretty much never see a Parkinson's disease patient without recommending exercise," said Dr. Michael Okun, medical director of the Parkinson's Foundation. He is also chairman of neurology at the University of Florida. Parkinson's disease causes the brain to produce less dopamine, which leads to a loss of movement control. Physical symptoms include shaking, slowness and stiffness, but vary widely between individuals. The review measured the combined outcomes of more than 100 studies conducted over the past 30 years ... Read more

Related support groups: Benadryl, Parkinson's Disease, Diphenhydramine, Mirapex, Requip, Ropinirole, Sinemet, Pramipexole, Levodopa, Emsam, Azilect, Bromocriptine, Cogentin, Cabergoline, Carbidopa, Benztropine, Selegiline, Neupro, Benadryl Allergy, Amantadine

Electronic In-Hospital Prescribing: Trouble for Older Adults?

Posted 29 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 29, 2016 – Preprogrammed doses of medications that can raise the risk of falls are often set too high for older hospital patients, new research shows. In the study, doctors looked at the records of 287 patients over the age of 65 who fell while staying in a large urban hospital. Some patients fell more than once, adding to a total of 328 falls in the study. Of those falls, 62 percent occurred in patients who had been given at least one high-risk medication in the 24 hours before their fall. Of that 62 percent, 16 percent had been given two high-risk medicines, while another 16 percent had been given three or more. And 41 percent of the medications studied were electronically set at doses that were greater than recommended for older patients. The 29 medicines examined included opioid painkillers such as OxyContin and Percocet, sleeping pills, muscle relaxants and ... Read more

Related support groups: Xanax, Oxycodone, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Percocet, Tramadol, OxyContin, Klonopin, Fentanyl, Clonazepam, Morphine, Ativan, Ambien, Valium, Codeine, Opana, Lorazepam, Alprazolam, Subutex, Dilaudid

Food Labels on Potential Allergens May Confuse Shoppers

Posted 1 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 1, 2016 – Shoppers are often confused by food labels that warn of potential allergens, and the consequences can be serious, new research suggests. "Up to 40 percent of consumers who either themselves have a food allergy or a child with a food allergy are purchasing products with precautionary allergen labels," said lead researcher Dr. Ruchi Gupta. She is a pediatrician at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago. The most misunderstood food labels, the researchers found, are those that say "may contain" or "manufactured on shared equipment." While those labels may sound like the foods aren't as dangerous as those that say a product definitely contains a particular allergen, that's not the case, Gupta stressed. Gupta and her colleagues conducted an online survey of more than 6,600 respondents in the United States and Canada. Those answering the questions either ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Zyrtec, Hydroxyzine, Promethazine, Claritin, Allegra, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Allergic Rhinitis, Phenergan, Hay Fever, Cetirizine, Vistaril, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Epinephrine, Periactin

Health Tip: Health Tip: Manage Allergies

Posted 20 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

-- If pets make you sniffle, sneeze, itch and cough, there are things you can do that don't include getting rid of Fido or Fluffy. The American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology recommends: Limiting how much time you spend around your pet. Taking nasal spray, an antihistamine or bronchodilator, as directed by your allergist. Talking to your doctor about allergy shots. Don't let the pet into your bedroom. Always wash your hands immediately after touching your pet. Give the pet a bath once weekly. Use a high-efficiency vacuum or HEPA air filter at home. Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Zyrtec, Hydroxyzine, Promethazine, Claritin, Allegra, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Allergic Rhinitis, Phenergan, Hay Fever, Cetirizine, Vistaril, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Flonase, Fexofenadine, Periactin

Parents of Kids With Food Allergies Believe They're Allergic, Too

Posted 12 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 – Many parents of children with food allergies mistakenly believe they are allergic, too, a new study finds. The study included parents who said they, like their kids, had food allergies. But fewer than one-third of the parents tested positive for food allergies. The study was published Oct. 12 in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. "Either people haven't been tested and are assuming an allergy from a previous reaction to a food, or they haven't been tested properly and may not truly have an allergy. Allergy testing, including blood and skin prick testing, is not always reliable," co-lead author Dr. Melanie Makhija said in a journal news release. The study included nearly 2,500 parents whose children had food allergies. Of these, almost 14 percent of parents said they themselves had a food allergy. But when those parents were tested, researchers found ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Zyrtec, Hydroxyzine, Promethazine, Claritin, Allegra, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Allergic Rhinitis, Phenergan, Hay Fever, Cetirizine, Vistaril, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Periactin, Chlorpheniramine

6 Keys to a Safe, Allergy-Free Halloween

Posted 10 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 – Halloween can be really scary for kids with asthma and allergies – and for their parents – unless they take precautions, an allergist advises. "Keep certain common sense tips in mind as you prepare for the holiday," said Bryan Martin, president of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI). "A little preparation can ensure your little ones don't suffer from allergic reactions or asthma attacks," Martin said in an ACAAI news release. To help parents prepare, he offered these six tips: Masks can be scary. For kids with asthma, try to choose a costume that doesn't require a mask. If a child insists on one, it should not be tight-fitting or obstruct breathing. Halloween makeup sometimes causes allergic reactions. Use only high-quality, hypoallergenic makeup, and test it on a small patch of skin in advance to see if it triggers a reaction. Skip ... Read more

Related support groups: Skin Rash, Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Zyrtec, Hydroxyzine, Promethazine, Claritin, Allegra, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Phenergan, Cetirizine, Vistaril, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Periactin, Chlorpheniramine, Xyzal

4 Ways to Protect Yourself Against Poison Ivy, Oak and Sumac

Posted 11 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 11, 2016 – When you're enjoying the great outdoors, be on the lookout for poison ivy, poison oak and poison sumac. The urushiol oil in their sap can cause itching, a red rash and blisters. These symptoms can appear from a few hours to several days after exposure, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Learn what these plants look like so you can avoid them. The old saying "Leaves of three, let it be" is a helpful reminder for poison ivy and poison oak. But it's not foolproof – the form may vary depending on the type of plant you encounter. Poison sumac, meanwhile, usually has clusters of 7 to 13 leaves, according to the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. If you're working in areas with these plants, wear long sleeves, long pants tucked into boots and impermeable gloves. Wash garden tools and gloves regularly. Wash pets if they may ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Zyrtec, Hydroxyzine, Promethazine, Claritin, Allegra, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Phenergan, Cetirizine, Vistaril, Clobetasol, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fluocinonide, Fexofenadine, Periactin, Chlorpheniramine

Allergies Less Common in Kids Who Suck Thumb, Bite Nails

Posted 11 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 11, 2016 – If your kid's nail-biting or thumb-sucking habit drives you nuts, you'll be happy to hear that a new study suggests those habits may have a health benefit. Children who suck their thumb or bite their nails past preschool age may be less prone to allergic reactions when they reached adolescence, researchers said. What's more, the study found that the protective effects seemed to last into adulthood. Still no one is suggesting that kids be encouraged to take up the habits, said senior researcher Dr. Robert Hancox, of the University of Otago in Dunedin, New Zealand. With thumb-sucking, in particular, there's some concern that it can interfere with the alignment of the teeth as they come in. "We don't wish to dismiss these concerns," Hancox said. "But," he added, "if a child has a habit that is difficult to break, maybe there is some consolation in the fact that ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Zyrtec, Hydroxyzine, Promethazine, Claritin, Allegra, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Allergic Rhinitis, Phenergan, Hay Fever, Cetirizine, Vistaril, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Periactin, Chlorpheniramine

Easing Your Child's Allergies

Posted 16 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 15, 2016 – Up to 40 percent of children in the United States have nasal allergies, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says. These kids likely have persistent sneezing, along with a stuffy or runny nose. These symptoms – known as allergic rhinitis – are more likely to develop if one or both parents have allergies, the agency noted. Nasal allergies can be caused by outdoor allergens such as plant pollens (seasonal allergies) or indoor allergens such as mold, dust mites and pet dander. If your child has seasonal allergies, pay attention to pollen counts and try to keep him or her inside when pollen levels are high, the FDA suggests. In the spring and summer, during the grass pollen season, pollen levels are highest in the evening. In the late summer and early fall, during ragweed pollen season, pollen levels are highest in the morning. Some molds may also be seasonal. ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Zyrtec, Hydroxyzine, Promethazine, Claritin, Allegra, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Allergic Rhinitis, Phenergan, Hay Fever, Cetirizine, Vistaril, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Flonase, Fexofenadine, Periactin

Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 Next

Ask a Question

Further Information

Related Condition Support Groups

Insomnia, Allergic Reactions, Cough, Hay Fever, Allergic Rhinitis, Extrapyramidal Reaction, Cold Symptoms, Urticaria, Hives, Nausea / Vomiting, Pruritus, Motion Sickness

Related Drug Support Groups

Benadryl, Benadryl Allergy, Sominex, ZzzQuil, Simply Sleep, Nytol, Q-Dryl, Diphen, Triaminic Thin Strips, view more... Nightime Sleepaid, Sleep Tabs, Sleepinal, Nervine, Benadryl Ultratab, Genahist, Diphen Cough, Diphendryl, Diphenhist, Diphenyl, Somnicaps, Nytol QuickCaps, Calm-Aid, Banaril, Banophen, Nu-Med, Aller-G-Time, Tusstat, Twilite, Valu-Dryl, Unisom SleepMelts, Aler-Dryl, Aler-Tab, Truxadryl, Dicopanol, Histaprin, Buckley's Bedtime, Pharbedryl, Z-Sleep, Beldin, Belix, Nytol Caplet, Pardryl, Ben-Tann, Benadryl Allergy Fastmelt, Benadryl Child Dye Free, Benadryl DF, Benadryl Dye Free Allergy, Siladryl, Siladryl DAS, Siladyl SA, Benahist-10, Benahist-50, Allergia-C, Silphen Cough, Allermax, Hydramine, Diphedryl, Hydramine Compound, Hydramine Cough Syrup, Diphen AF, Q-Dryl A / F, Diphenadryl, Benoject-50, Diphenmax, ConRx Allergy, Diphenydramine Quick Melt, Diphenylin, Complete Allergy, Scot-Tussin Allergy, Siladryl Allergy, Miles Nervine, Quenalin, Uni-Tann, Sleep-ettes D, Sleepwell 2-nite, Snooze Fast, Sleep Tab II, Trux-adryl, Bydramine, Sleep-ettes, Sleep-Eze-3, Altaryl, Total Allergy, 40 Winks, Dormin, Dytan, Dytuss, Unisom SleepGels, Hyrexin

Benadryl Child Dye Free Patient Information at Drugs.com