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Electronic In-Hospital Prescribing: Trouble for Older Adults?

Posted 6 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 29, 2016 – Preprogrammed doses of medications that can raise the risk of falls are often set too high for older hospital patients, new research shows. In the study, doctors looked at the records of 287 patients over the age of 65 who fell while staying in a large urban hospital. Some patients fell more than once, adding to a total of 328 falls in the study. Of those falls, 62 percent occurred in patients who had been given at least one high-risk medication in the 24 hours before their fall. Of that 62 percent, 16 percent had been given two high-risk medicines, while another 16 percent had been given three or more. And 41 percent of the medications studied were electronically set at doses that were greater than recommended for older patients. The 29 medicines examined included opioid painkillers such as OxyContin and Percocet, sleeping pills, muscle relaxants and ... Read more

Related support groups: Xanax, Oxycodone, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Percocet, Tramadol, OxyContin, Klonopin, Fentanyl, Clonazepam, Morphine, Ativan, Ambien, Valium, Codeine, Opana, Lorazepam, Subutex, Alprazolam, Dilaudid

Food Labels on Potential Allergens May Confuse Shoppers

Posted 1 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 1, 2016 – Shoppers are often confused by food labels that warn of potential allergens, and the consequences can be serious, new research suggests. "Up to 40 percent of consumers who either themselves have a food allergy or a child with a food allergy are purchasing products with precautionary allergen labels," said lead researcher Dr. Ruchi Gupta. She is a pediatrician at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago. The most misunderstood food labels, the researchers found, are those that say "may contain" or "manufactured on shared equipment." While those labels may sound like the foods aren't as dangerous as those that say a product definitely contains a particular allergen, that's not the case, Gupta stressed. Gupta and her colleagues conducted an online survey of more than 6,600 respondents in the United States and Canada. Those answering the questions either ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Claritin, Diphenhydramine, Allegra, Phenergan, Loratadine, Vistaril, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Cetirizine, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Periactin, Fexofenadine, Epinephrine

Health Tip: Health Tip: Manage Allergies

Posted 20 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

-- If pets make you sniffle, sneeze, itch and cough, there are things you can do that don't include getting rid of Fido or Fluffy. The American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology recommends: Limiting how much time you spend around your pet. Taking nasal spray, an antihistamine or bronchodilator, as directed by your allergist. Talking to your doctor about allergy shots. Don't let the pet into your bedroom. Always wash your hands immediately after touching your pet. Give the pet a bath once weekly. Use a high-efficiency vacuum or HEPA air filter at home. Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Claritin, Diphenhydramine, Allegra, Phenergan, Loratadine, Vistaril, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Cetirizine, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Flonase, Fexofenadine, Periactin

Parents of Kids With Food Allergies Believe They're Allergic, Too

Posted 12 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 – Many parents of children with food allergies mistakenly believe they are allergic, too, a new study finds. The study included parents who said they, like their kids, had food allergies. But fewer than one-third of the parents tested positive for food allergies. The study was published Oct. 12 in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. "Either people haven't been tested and are assuming an allergy from a previous reaction to a food, or they haven't been tested properly and may not truly have an allergy. Allergy testing, including blood and skin prick testing, is not always reliable," co-lead author Dr. Melanie Makhija said in a journal news release. The study included nearly 2,500 parents whose children had food allergies. Of these, almost 14 percent of parents said they themselves had a food allergy. But when those parents were tested, researchers found ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Claritin, Diphenhydramine, Allegra, Phenergan, Loratadine, Vistaril, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Cetirizine, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Periactin, Fexofenadine, Chlorpheniramine

6 Keys to a Safe, Allergy-Free Halloween

Posted 10 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 – Halloween can be really scary for kids with asthma and allergies – and for their parents – unless they take precautions, an allergist advises. "Keep certain common sense tips in mind as you prepare for the holiday," said Bryan Martin, president of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI). "A little preparation can ensure your little ones don't suffer from allergic reactions or asthma attacks," Martin said in an ACAAI news release. To help parents prepare, he offered these six tips: Masks can be scary. For kids with asthma, try to choose a costume that doesn't require a mask. If a child insists on one, it should not be tight-fitting or obstruct breathing. Halloween makeup sometimes causes allergic reactions. Use only high-quality, hypoallergenic makeup, and test it on a small patch of skin in advance to see if it triggers a reaction. Skip ... Read more

Related support groups: Skin Rash, Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Claritin, Diphenhydramine, Allegra, Phenergan, Loratadine, Vistaril, Cetirizine, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Periactin, Chlorpheniramine, Xyzal

4 Ways to Protect Yourself Against Poison Ivy, Oak and Sumac

Posted 11 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 11, 2016 – When you're enjoying the great outdoors, be on the lookout for poison ivy, poison oak and poison sumac. The urushiol oil in their sap can cause itching, a red rash and blisters. These symptoms can appear from a few hours to several days after exposure, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Learn what these plants look like so you can avoid them. The old saying "Leaves of three, let it be" is a helpful reminder for poison ivy and poison oak. But it's not foolproof – the form may vary depending on the type of plant you encounter. Poison sumac, meanwhile, usually has clusters of 7 to 13 leaves, according to the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. If you're working in areas with these plants, wear long sleeves, long pants tucked into boots and impermeable gloves. Wash garden tools and gloves regularly. Wash pets if they may ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Claritin, Diphenhydramine, Allegra, Phenergan, Loratadine, Vistaril, Cetirizine, Cyproheptadine, Clobetasol, Atarax, Fluocinonide, Periactin, Fexofenadine, Chlorpheniramine

Allergies Less Common in Kids Who Suck Thumb, Bite Nails

Posted 11 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 11, 2016 – If your kid's nail-biting or thumb-sucking habit drives you nuts, you'll be happy to hear that a new study suggests those habits may have a health benefit. Children who suck their thumb or bite their nails past preschool age may be less prone to allergic reactions when they reached adolescence, researchers said. What's more, the study found that the protective effects seemed to last into adulthood. Still no one is suggesting that kids be encouraged to take up the habits, said senior researcher Dr. Robert Hancox, of the University of Otago in Dunedin, New Zealand. With thumb-sucking, in particular, there's some concern that it can interfere with the alignment of the teeth as they come in. "We don't wish to dismiss these concerns," Hancox said. "But," he added, "if a child has a habit that is difficult to break, maybe there is some consolation in the fact that ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Claritin, Diphenhydramine, Allegra, Phenergan, Loratadine, Vistaril, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Cetirizine, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Periactin, Chlorpheniramine

Easing Your Child's Allergies

Posted 16 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 15, 2016 – Up to 40 percent of children in the United States have nasal allergies, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says. These kids likely have persistent sneezing, along with a stuffy or runny nose. These symptoms – known as allergic rhinitis – are more likely to develop if one or both parents have allergies, the agency noted. Nasal allergies can be caused by outdoor allergens such as plant pollens (seasonal allergies) or indoor allergens such as mold, dust mites and pet dander. If your child has seasonal allergies, pay attention to pollen counts and try to keep him or her inside when pollen levels are high, the FDA suggests. In the spring and summer, during the grass pollen season, pollen levels are highest in the evening. In the late summer and early fall, during ragweed pollen season, pollen levels are highest in the morning. Some molds may also be seasonal. ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Claritin, Diphenhydramine, Allegra, Phenergan, Loratadine, Vistaril, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Cetirizine, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Flonase, Fexofenadine, Periactin

Health Tip: Spot Signs of Summer Allergies

Posted 6 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Think you've had a summer cold? Summer allergies might actually be to blame. Here are some warning signs of allergy, courtesy of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology: Dark circles below the eyes. Swollen adenoids that cause the face to look tired and droopy. A nasal crease, which is a line that forms on the bridge of the nose. Breathing through the mouth due to nasal congestion. Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Claritin, Diphenhydramine, Allegra, Phenergan, Loratadine, Vistaril, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Cetirizine, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Periactin, Fexofenadine, Chlorpheniramine

Health Tip: Selecting a Sleep Mask

Posted 3 May 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Bright light can interrupt sleep quickly, so many people use a sleep mask. The National Sleep Foundation suggests how to choose the right one: Consider whether you need a sleep mask that provides total blackout, or one that provides darker conditions in a room that's already fairly dark. Look for a mask that fits across the bridge of the nose. Invest in a quality mask with a nose flap to help block more light and provide a better fit. Opt for a mask with cavities that alleviate pressure around your eyes. Find the right fabric that feels comfortable, is easy to wash and doesn't trigger allergies. Read more

Related support groups: Xanax, Sleep Disorders, Klonopin, Insomnia, Clonazepam, Ativan, Ambien, Valium, Fatigue, Lorazepam, Alprazolam, Benadryl, BuSpar, Diazepam, Narcolepsy, Zolpidem, Hydroxyzine, Buspirone, Melatonin, Temazepam

Desperate for Shut-Eye?

Posted 3 May 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 2, 2016 – People with long-term sleep troubles should turn to a form of psychotherapy to reboot normal sleeping patterns before trying sleeping pills, the American College of Physicians recommends. Specifically, people with chronic insomnia should try cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), the experts said. This treatment combines talk therapy, behavioral interventions and education. If CBT doesn't work, patients and their doctors should then decide together whether to add drug therapy, the new guidelines said. "We know chronic insomnia is a real problem that patients present within our [doctors'] offices," said Dr. Wayne Riley, president of the American College of Physicians (ACP). "We want to get away from the overtendency to prescribe sleep medications, and clearly CBT can be a very nice tool in the toolkit." Up to 10 percent of adults are affected by insomnia, defined as ... Read more

Related support groups: Xanax, Sleep Disorders, Klonopin, Insomnia, Clonazepam, Ativan, Ambien, Valium, Fatigue, Lorazepam, Alprazolam, Benadryl, BuSpar, Diazepam, Narcolepsy, Zolpidem, Hydroxyzine, Buspirone, Melatonin, Temazepam

Heat Beats Cold for Treating Jellyfish Stings

Posted 29 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, April 29, 2016 – If you're unlucky enough to suffer a jellyfish sting, new research says that heat is better than cold for easing the pain. The team at the University of Hawaii at Manoa noted that jellyfish stings are a growing health problem worldwide. But, there has been disagreement over how best to treat and manage the painful stings. "People think ice will help because jelly stings burn and ice is cold," study author Christie Wilcox, a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Hawaii's School of Medicine, said in a university news release. "And if you Google it, many sites – even those considered reputable – will tell you to put ice on a sting to dull the pain. But research to date has shown that all marine venoms are highly heat sensitive, thus hot water or hot packs should be more effective than cold packs or ice," she explained. In an attempt to resolve the ongoing ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Claritin, Diphenhydramine, Allegra, Phenergan, Loratadine, Vistaril, Cetirizine, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Periactin, Fexofenadine, Chlorpheniramine, Xyzal, Levocetirizine, Benadryl Allergy

Health Tip: Enjoy a Healthier Plane Ride

Posted 28 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Planning a plane trip? There are steps you can take for a better, healthier excursion. Here are suggestions from the American Academy of Family Physicians: Store medication to be taken during the trip in a carry-on bag. Pack extra meds in case of unexpected delays. Talk to your doctor about whether you'll need to adjust your meds during your trip. Keep an identification card with you at all times if you have epilepsy or diabetes. Also, bring a list of all medications and doses, and your doctor's contact information. Drink plenty of water before and during your flight to prevent dehydration. Read more

Related support groups: Benadryl, Promethazine, Diphenhydramine, Phenergan, Tylenol PM, NyQuil, Unisom, Alka-Seltzer, Doxylamine, Motion Sickness, Benadryl Allergy, Codeine/Promethazine, Promethazine with Codeine, Advil PM, Promethazine DM, ZzzQuil, Simply Sleep, Itch Relief, Promethazine VC, Sominex

Can Certain Allergy Meds Worsen Restless Legs Syndrome?

Posted 19 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 19, 2016 – Over-the-counter allergy medications may worsen symptoms of restless legs syndrome, a neurologist contends. People with the syndrome experience uncomfortable sensations and strong urges to move their legs, which can be painful and disrupt sleep, according to Dr. William Ondo. He is director of the Movement Disorders Clinic at Houston Methodist Hospital. Nearly 12 million people in the United States have restless legs syndrome, according to the American Sleep Association. "Patients with restless legs syndrome already have difficulty sleeping as their symptoms tend to worsen at night or with rest, but sedating antihistamines ... can intensify the symptoms," Ondo said in a hospital news release. Many people take sedating antihistamines to treat sneezing, runny nose and other symptoms of seasonal allergies. "We don't yet understand why sedating antihistamines ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Claritin, Diphenhydramine, Allegra, Phenergan, Loratadine, Vistaril, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Cetirizine, Tylenol PM, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Periactin

Spring Allergies? Don't Assume It's Only Pollen

Posted 15 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, April 15, 2016 – Spring allergy season is here, so if you know your triggers you can start reducing your symptoms, experts say. You may believe pollen is the culprit. But, other substances such as mold may be involved in your allergies as well, according to the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. The college says more than two-thirds of people with spring allergies actually have symptoms all year long. Here are some of the experts' tips for keeping your sniffles and sneezes at bay during allergy season: Monitor pollen and mold counts. This information is often included in weather reports. Keep windows and doors shut at home and in your car during allergy season, and try to stay inside at midday and during the afternoon, when pollen counts are highest. When mowing the lawn or doing other outdoor chores, wear a N95 filter mask rated by the U.S. National Institute ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Claritin, Diphenhydramine, Allegra, Phenergan, Loratadine, Vistaril, Cetirizine, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Periactin, Chlorpheniramine, Xyzal, Levocetirizine

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Allergic Reactions, Cough, Hay Fever, Allergic Rhinitis, Extrapyramidal Reaction, Urticaria, Hives, Nausea / Vomiting, Cold Symptoms, Pruritus, Motion Sickness

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