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Barrett's Esophagus News

Related terms: Barrett's Syndrome

Could Common Heartburn Drugs Up Stroke Risk?

Posted 15 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 15, 2016 – A popular category of heartburn medications – including Nexium, Prevacid, Prilosec and Protonix – may increase your risk of stroke, a new study suggests. Known as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), these drugs increased people's overall stroke risk by 21 percent, said study lead author Dr. Thomas Sehested. However, the risk appears to be driven by people who take high doses, added Sehested, research director at the Danish Heart Foundation in Copenhagen. "People treated with a low dose of PPIs did not have a high risk of stroke," he said. "Those treated with the highest doses of PPIs had the highest risk of stroke." The extent of risk also depends on the specific PPI taken. At the highest dose, stroke risk ranged from 30 percent for lansoprazole (Prevacid) to 94 percent for pantoprazole (Protonix), the researchers said. Takeda Pharmaceutical, the maker of ... Read more

Related support groups: GERD, Heart Disease, Ischemic Stroke, Omeprazole, Nexium, Dementia, Prilosec, Zantac, Protonix, Indigestion, Pantoprazole, Alzheimer's Disease, Ranitidine, Lansoprazole, Dexilant, Prevacid, Transient Ischemic Attack, Pepcid, Barrett's Esophagus, Aciphex

Common Heartburn Drugs Linked to Kidney Disease in Study

Posted 15 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, April 14, 2016 – People who use certain drugs for chronic heartburn may be at increased risk of developing kidney disease, a new study suggests. The research is the latest to highlight potential risks from drugs called proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). PPIs include prescription and over-the-counter drugs, such as Prilosec, Prevacid and Nexium. But prolonged use of PPIs has been linked to certain nutrient deficiencies and bone-density loss. According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, bone fractures are considered a safety concern when people use PPIs for a year or more. More recently, research has hinted at additional hazards. Last year, for example, a study tied the medications to a slight increase in heart attack risk. However, neither that study nor this new one prove that PPIs are directly to blame for these problems. "I cannot say for certain that this is ... Read more

Related support groups: GERD, Omeprazole, Prilosec, Protonix, Renal Failure, Pantoprazole, Barrett's Esophagus, Chronic Kidney Disease, Zegerid, Prilosec OTC, Zegerid OTC, Omeclamox-Pak, Omeprazole/Sodium Bicarbonate/Magnesium Hydroxide, Protonix IV, Omeprazole/Sodium Bicarbonate, Renal and Genitourinary Disorders, Omesec, Amoxicillin/clarithromycin/omeprazole

Could a Low-Risk Surgery Help Your Chronic Heartburn?

Posted 30 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 29, 2016 – A minimally invasive surgery to treat chronic heartburn is safer than generally believed, and could be a desirable alternative to long-term use of acid reflux medications, new research indicates. Scientists found the death rate following so-called laparoscopic fundoplication surgery for gastroesophageal reflux disease, or GERD, was far lower than the 1 percent often quoted. Experts contended the surgery might be underutilized, especially in light of increasing safety concerns about acid reflux drugs. "One of the main arguments against surgery when choosing between [drug] and surgical treatment for severe GERD is the risk of mortality," said study author Dr. John Maret-Ouda. He is a physician and doctoral student in upper gastrointestinal surgery at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden. But, "this study found only one death associated with [this surgery] among ... Read more

Related support groups: GERD, Indigestion, Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal Disorders, Barrett's Esophagus, Duodenitis/Gastritis, Gastric Bypass Surgery, Gastrointestinal Surgery, Erosive Gastritis, Duodenitis/Gastritis with Hemorrhage, Hypersecretory Conditions

Frequent Heartburn May Signal More Serious Digestive Problem

Posted 29 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 26, 2015 – Every Thanksgiving, lots of people loosen their belts and reach for antacids to quell an overstuffed tummy. But for some, turkey day is just another day of severe or persistent heartburn, and that chronic digestive trouble may be a sign of a condition called gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), an expert says. In GERD, the contents of the stomach repeatedly flow back into the esophagus. This causes symptoms such as chronic heartburn, regurgitation, difficulty swallowing, sore throat and morning hoarseness, explained Nancy Norton, president and founder of the International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders. "The symptoms of GERD can seem so common that many people do not consult with health care providers or mention them during routine exams," Norton said in a foundation news release. "When symptoms often occur two or more times a week, or ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, GERD, Weight Loss, Indigestion, Barrett's Esophagus, Duodenitis/Gastritis, Erosive Gastritis, Laryngopharyngeal Reflux, Hypersecretory Conditions

Health Tip: Identifying Symptoms of GERD

Posted 24 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) occurs when stomach acids back up into the esophagus. The U.S. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases mentions these symptoms: Having heartburn. Tasting stomach acid or food in the back of the mouth. Having bad breath. Feeling nauseated, or vomiting. Having difficulty breathing or swallowing. Wearing of tooth enamel. Read more

Related support groups: GERD, Indigestion, Helicobacter Pylori Infection, Barrett's Esophagus, Duodenitis/Gastritis, NSAID-Induced Ulcer Prophylaxis, Erosive Gastritis, Hypersecretory Conditions

Treatment May Prevent Esophagus Condition From Progressing to Cancer

Posted 25 Mar 2014 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 25, 2014 – Using radio-frequency waves to treat certain cases of Barrett's esophagus can substantially cut people's risk of progressing to esophageal cancer, a new clinical trial suggests. The trial, reported in the March 26 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, was stopped early because the benefit of the treatment – called radio-frequency ablation – was so clear. Still, the procedure is only for certain patients, and experts cautioned that there are some barriers to using it in the "real world." In the United States and Europe, about 2 percent to 6 percent of adults have Barrett's, in which the lining the esophagus gradually morphs to resemble the lining of the intestines. The cause is unclear, but people with chronic heartburn are at increased risk. Less than 1 percent of Barrett's patients develop a rare cancer called esophageal adenocarcinoma. ... Read more

Related support groups: Barrett's Esophagus

Untreated Heartburn May Raise Risk for Esophageal Cancer, Study Says

Posted 25 Jul 2012 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 25 – Rates of esophageal cancer have surged due to a lack of awareness about what causes the disease and how it can be prevented, experts say. The esophagus is the muscular tube that carries food and liquid from the mouth to the stomach. There were six times as many cases of esophageal cancer in 2001 as there were in 1975, according to a team from the University of California, Los Angeles. The researchers noted that one key way people can reduce their risk for the disease is by managing heartburn and acid reflux, often called gastroesophageal reflux disease, or GERD. "Obesity and poor diet have spiked the numbers suffering from acid reflux," Dr. V. Raman Muthusamy, associate clinical professor of medicine and endoscopy director at the UCLA Center for Esophageal Disorders, said in a university news release. If left untreated, GERD can cause stomach acid to wash ... Read more

Related support groups: GERD, Barrett's Esophagus, Esophageal Carcinoma

Chronic Heartburn May Boost Risk for Esophageal Cancer

Posted 18 May 2012 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, May 18 – Inflammation caused by chronic heartburn may increase the risk of esophageal cancer, a new study finds. The condition – formally known as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) – occurs when a muscle at the end of the esophagus doesn't close properly, allowing stomach contents to leak back into the esophagus and irritate it. GERD can lead to changes in the tissue lining the esophagus, a condition called Barrett's esophagus, often a precursor to esophageal cancer. In the study, researchers looked at nearly 34,000 GERD patients in Denmark and found that 77 percent had inflammation of the lining of the esophagus, a condition called erosive reflux disease. During an average follow-up time of 7.4 years, 0.11 percent of patients developed esophageal cancer. The incidence of esophageal cancer among GERD patients with erosive disease was much higher than that of the general ... Read more

Related support groups: GERD, Barrett's Esophagus, Esophageal Carcinoma

Esophageal Cancer Risk Less Dire for Certain Patients: Study

Posted 12 Oct 2011 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12 – The risk of developing deadly esophageal cancer for patients with a condition known as Barrett's esophagus is significant, but not as dire as once reported, a large new Danish study suggests. Analyzing records from Denmark's entire population of 5.4 million people, researchers determined that those with Barrett's esophagus – a disorder often brought on by chronic reflux – are about 11 times as likely as those without it to develop esophageal cancer, a substantial drop from the 30- or 40-factor increase reported in prior research. This particularly lethal form of cancer, which grew in prevalence in the United States six-fold between 1975 and 2001, occurs more often in older white men and has risk factors that include obesity and frequent heartburn. Patients with Barrett's esophagus, which sometimes produces abnormal cells, are typically monitored with frequent ... Read more

Related support groups: Barrett's Esophagus, Esophageal Carcinoma

Researchers Find 3 Genes Linked to Esophagus Disorders

Posted 26 Jul 2011 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 26 – Mutations in three genes have been found to be more common among people with disorders of the esophagus, including esophageal cancer and Barrett esophagus (a complication of gastroesophageal reflux disease), a new study shows. The findings could help identify those at greater risk for these conditions and lead to improved treatments, researchers from the Cleveland Clinic said in the report published in the July 27 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. "Finding predisposition genes may improve premorbid risk assessment, genetic counseling and management," Dr. Charis Eng and colleagues wrote. The developments are significant because in the United States and Europe, cases of esophageal cancer have surged 350 percent over the past 40 years and Barrett esophagus (which is believed to precede the cancer) affects 10 percent of the population, the authors ... Read more

Related support groups: GERD, Barrett's Esophagus, Esophageal Carcinoma

Cancer Risk With Barrett's Esophagus May Be Lower Than Thought

Posted 17 Jun 2011 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 16 – The risk of cancer associated with the condition known as Barrett's esophagus may be lower than previously thought, according to a new long-term study. People diagnosed with the premalignant condition are advised to undergo routine endoscopies to screen for esophageal adenocarcinoma, a common form of esophageal cancer. Endoscopy involves insertion of a long, thin tube with a camera at the end into the esophagus, enabling doctors to check for abnormalities. In conducting the study, published online June 16 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, researchers in Northern Ireland followed more than 8,500 patients diagnosed with Barrett's esophagus. During a follow-up period averaging seven years, 79 of the patients were diagnosed with esophageal cancer. Cancer of the gastric cardia (the part of the stomach closest to the esophagus) was diagnosed in another 16 ... Read more

Related support groups: Barrett's Esophagus

Alzheimer's Drug Might Help Prevent Esophageal Cancer

Posted 12 Jan 2010 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 12 – An experimental Alzheimer's drug may help prevent esophageal cancer, a new study shows. The drug, DBZ, currently in clinical trials for treatment of Alzheimer's disease, is known to have side effects on the lining of the lower colon. The cells that line the colon are similar to those seen in Barrett's esophagus, a condition that can progress to esophageal cancer. Barrett's esophagus occurs when chronic heartburn damages the lining of the esophagus. Researchers at the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands found that DBZ halted the growth of Barrett's esophagus in rats and, in some cases, eliminated the damaged esophageal tissue. Though the findings suggest that DBZ could be an effective way to treat Barrett's esophagus and prevent esophageal cancer, the drug is still a long way from being tested in human clinical trials, the researchers said. The study is in the ... Read more

Related support groups: Barrett's Esophagus, Esophageal Carcinoma

Heat Therapy May Help Prevent Esophageal Cancer

Posted 27 May 2009 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 27 – Radiofrequency ablation is an effective treatment for precancerous Barrett's esophagus, researchers have found. In people with Barrett's esophagus, repeated acid reflux causes cells that line the esophagus to be replaced by cells similar to those found in the intestine, according to background information provided in a news release. A small number of people with Barrett's esophagus develop a deadly form of cancer called esophageal adenocarcinoma. The new study included 127 people randomly selected to receive either radiofrequency ablation (RFA) – which uses heat to destroy abnormal cells – or a "sham" version of the procedure, to assess the effect on dysplasia, a more advanced stage of Barrett's esophagus in which the abnormal cells acquire precancerous traits. Among patients with low-grade dysplasia, 90.5 percent of those who received RFA were dysplasia-free 12 ... Read more

Related support groups: Barrett's Esophagus

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