Skip to Content

Join the 'Bacterial Skin Infection' group to help and get support from people like you.

Bacterial Skin Infection News

Related terms: Cellulitis, Infection, skin, bacterial, Skin Infection, bacterial

A Dirty Little Secret: Hand-Washing Spotty Among Day Care Staffers

Posted 2 days 8 hours ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 1, 2016 – Too few child care workers follow hand-washing guidelines, a new study suggests. University of Arkansas researchers used video cameras to record the hand-washing habits of adults at an early childhood center in the state. Overall, only 22 percent of the adults followed proper hand-washing procedures before and/or after tasks such as wiping noses, emptying garbage cans, preparing food, and changing diapers, the study found. Hand-washing rates were 30 percent among caregivers, 11 percent among paraprofessional aides and just 4 percent among parents at the facility, according to the study. The study results were published in the December issue of the American Journal of Infection Control. "Hand-washing is an important component of reducing illness transmission among children in early childhood centers, especially for the adults in charge of their care," said study ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Bacterial Skin Infection, Viral Infection

How to Prevent Spread of the Skin Infection Impetigo

Posted 6 days ago by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, Nov. 27, 2016 – Impetigo is a contagious skin infection that's preventable and can be treated with antibiotics, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says. It's common among kids, but adults can get impetigo, too. The telltale signs are blisters or sores, usually on the face, neck, hands and diaper area. Impetigo can strike anytime but is more common during warm weather months. More than 3 million cases a year occur in the United States. It's caused by two types of bacteria that are usually harmless. They can trigger infection when someone suffers a minor cut, scrape or insect bite. "We typically see impetigo with kids 2 to 6 years old, probably because they get more cuts and scrapes and scratch more. And that spreads the bacteria," FDA pediatrician Dr. Thomas Smith said in an agency news release. Symptoms include itchy rash; itchy red sores that fill with fluid and then burst, ... Read more

Related support groups: Bacterial Skin Infection, Impetigo, Minor Skin Irritation, Minor Skin Conditions

'Superbug' Common Among N.C. Hog Workers, Study Says

Posted 15 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 18, 2016 – Some workers at hog production facilities in the United States have skin infections from drug-resistant "superbugs," researchers report. Hogs are given antibiotics to speed their growth. But, overuse of the drugs has been linked to the development of bacteria that don't respond to many antibiotics commonly used to treat staph infections, the researchers said in background notes. "This study suggests that carrying these bacteria may not always be harmless to humans," said study leader Christopher Heaney. He's an assistant professor with the Bloomberg School of Public Health at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. Previously, it was known that many hog workers had these bacteria in their noses, but it wasn't clear if the workers were at increased risk of infection, Heaney said. This study included 103 hog facility workers in North Carolina and 80 child and adult ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Skin Infection, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection, Bacterial Skin Infection, Bacteremia

Health Tip: Prevent Antibiotic Resistance

Posted 9 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Antibiotic resistance applies when bacteria are no longer eliminated by a medicine that's supposed to kill them. Experts blame the problem on improper use of antibiotic medications. Here's what you can do to help, according to the World Health Organization: Only take antibiotics when prescribed by a health professional. Always finish the entire supply of antibiotics. Stopping too soon may allow the bacteria to continue living. Never save antibiotics for later use or use leftover antibiotics, and never share antibiotics with someone else. To help reduce the risk of infection in the first place, wash your hands often, get vaccinations and limit your contact with sick people. Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Amoxicillin, Doxycycline, Bacterial Infection, Cephalexin, Azithromycin, Bactrim, Cipro, Ciprofloxacin, Levaquin, Keflex, Zithromax, Trimethoprim, Sulfamethoxazole, Nitrofurantoin, Erythromycin, Minocycline, Clarithromycin, Bacterial Skin Infection, Levofloxacin

Skin Condition Often Misdiagnosed as Bacterial Problem

Posted 4 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 4, 2016 – Misdiagnosis of the bacterial skin condition cellulitis often leads to unnecessary antibiotic use and hospitalizations, a new study says. About one-third of people diagnosed with cellulitis don't actually have it, researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston found. The researchers looked at a 30-month period, examining the medical records of 259 people hospitalized for lower extremity cellulitis in the hospital's emergency department. But, 79 of the patients didn't have cellulitis. Almost 85 percent didn't need hospitalization and 92 percent didn't need the antibiotics they received, the researchers said. Looking at how their findings might reflect the nation as a whole, the researchers estimated that the misdiagnosed skin condition leads to about 130,000 unnecessary hospitalizations. The problem may cause up to $515 million in unneeded medical ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Skin Rash, Skin Infection, Bacterial Skin Infection, Skin and Structure Infection, Secondary Cutaneous Bacterial Infections, Minor Skin Conditions

New MRSA Strain Found in Denmark

Posted 23 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 23, 2016 – Researchers in Denmark have identified a new form of the superbug known as MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) that they suspect may be spread through eating contaminated poultry. People who raise livestock are known to face a higher risk for MRSA, the researchers said. But, the new strain infected 10 urban-dwelling people who hadn't been working on a farm and had no direct contact with live farm animals. Instead, the researchers believe the MRSA patients were infected after eating or handling poultry that had been imported from other European countries. "This is one of the first studies providing compelling evidence that everyday consumers are also potentially at risk," study author Lance Price said in a news release from George Washington University (GWU), in Washington, D.C. Price serves as director of the Antibiotic Resistance Action Center ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection, Bacterial Skin Infection

Daily Baths Not a Must for Kids

Posted 22 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 21, 2016 – Here's welcome news for parents tired of forcing their kids to take a daily bath: Children may not need to bathe every day after all. That's the word from Dr. Robert Sidbury, an associate professor with the department of pediatrics and division chief of dermatology at the University of Washington School of Medicine in St. Louis. "Depending on their age and activity level, most children only need a bath a few times a week," Sidbury said in a news release from the American Academy of Dermatology. "For children, a few germs here and there are healthy, as this is how their bodies learn to fight off bacteria and build stronger immune systems." Sidbury provides these recommendations about bathing for kids: If a child is aged 6 to 11, only two or three baths a week may be needed, and shampooing is necessary just once or twice a week. Black children or kids of any ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Bacterial Skin Infection

Cat Scratch Can Sometimes Lead to Serious Illness: CDC

Posted 21 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 21, 2016 – If Fluffy the cat gets out of sorts and scratches you, it's possible you could get a bacterial infection called cat-scratch disease that might even land you in the hospital. An estimated 12,000 Americans are infected each year with cat-scratch disease, and around 500 must go to the hospital, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. The disease is spread by infected fleas. Cats pick up the bacteria that causes the disease – Bartonella henselae – from scratching and grooming flea excrement on their fur. They can then transfer the bacteria by scratching someone. "When cats scratch themselves they get the bacteria on their claws, so when they scratch a person the bacteria can enter the skin and infect the person," said lead researcher Dr. Christina Nelson, a CDC medical officer. People also get the illness from cat bites or through a break in ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Bacterial Skin Infection

More Must Be Done to Fight 'Superbugs': U.S. Gov't Report

Posted 20 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 20, 2016 – Antibiotic-resistant "superbugs" remain a major public health threat, and only a multipronged attack can address the problem, a new U.S. government report warns. The issue of antibiotic resistance isn't new, and experts have long called for measures to combat it. Still, more than 2 million Americans fall ill each year from infections that are resistant to antibiotics, and roughly 23,000 die, according to the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID). "We still face major challenges, and we still have a long way to go in addressing this problem," said NIAID director Dr. Anthony Fauci. He and his colleagues explained the scope of the issue in the Sept. 20 Journal of the American Medical Association. The researchers also pointed to possible solutions – some of which are beginning to be implemented. Scientists have long known that ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Bacterial Skin Infection

CDC: Too Many Antibiotics Still Being Prescribed in U.S.

Posted 19 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Sept. 19, 2016 – Despite growing concerns about creating drug-resistant bacteria, overprescribing of antibiotics in U.S. hospitals didn't drop between 2006 and 2012, according to a new federal report. Over that time period, 55 percent of patients received at least one dose of antibiotics during their hospital stay, whether it was needed or not, researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. "Antibiotic use remains common, and use of the most powerful antibiotics is rising," said lead researcher James Baggs, a CDC epidemiologist. Although the use of antibiotics remained about the same during the study period, a significant increase was seen in the use of newer antibiotics, Baggs said. "Because inappropriate antibiotic use increases the risk of antibiotic resistance and other side effects, continued monitoring of antibiotic use is critical to future ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Amoxicillin, Doxycycline, Bacterial Infection, Bactrim, Cipro, Ciprofloxacin, Augmentin, Levaquin, Trimethoprim, Sulfamethoxazole, Nitrofurantoin, Minocycline, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection, Bacterial Skin Infection, Levofloxacin, Macrobid, Clavulanate, Bactrim DS, Tetracycline

FDA Cracks Down on Antibacterial Soaps

Posted 2 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 2, 2016 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is banning most antibacterial soaps and body washes currently on store shelves, arguing that the products create potential health risks but don't perform any better than plain old soap and water. The ban covers soaps and body washes containing triclosan and triclocarban, the two most common antibacterial ingredients, the FDA says. Another 17 active ingredients also are included in the ban. "Most consumer wash products labeled 'antibacterial' or 'antimicrobial' contain at least one of the antibacterial ingredients addressed in this final rule," said Dr. Theresa Michele, director of the Division of Nonprescription Drug Products at the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. There are more than 2,100 antibacterial soaps sold today, representing about 40 percent of the overall soap market, Michele said during a media ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Bacterial Skin Infection, Triclosan, Aktif, Gel-X, Asept, Triclotrex-B, Septi-Soft, Cadisept, Digiclean, Digiclean Slim-Line, Aquasept, Antiseptic Hand Soap, Sanygel, Bacti-Stat, Septisol, Cetaphil Antibacterial, Digiclean E

2nd U.S. Case of Bacteria Resistant to Last-Resort Antibiotic

Posted 12 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 11, 2016 – Scientists have identified a second patient in the United States who was infected with a bacteria that is resistant to an antibiotic of last resort. The new case involved a patient in New York, while the first reported case involved a woman from Pennsylvania. However, the New York patient was actually infected more than a year ago and the resistant bacteria was only spotted recently in lab testing. The Pennsylvania infection occurred last spring, researchers said. Both patients had E. coli with a gene called mcr-1, which makes bacteria resistant to the antibiotic colistin, the scientists explained. In the latest study, the researchers tested more than 13,500 strains of E. coli and nearly 7,500 strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae collected from hospitals in North America, Latin America, Europe and the Asia-Pacific region in 2015. The results showed that almost 2 ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection, Bacterial Skin Infection

Headed to the Pool? Protect Yourself From the Poop

Posted 10 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, July 9, 2016 – Swimming is a great way to cool off on a hot day, but beware of fecal contamination that can make you sick, an expert says. "The most common problems people get while swimming are intestinal infections, either bacterial or viral," said Dr. William Schaffner, chairman of the Department of Preventive Medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, in Nashville. Symptoms include diarrhea, nausea, vomiting and sometimes fever. These symptoms occur several hours after infection, so people often don't realize they were infected while swimming. There are a number of ways to reduce the risk of such infections. Check the pool before you or your children get in. "Does it have clear and clean water? If not, you should reconsider getting in," Schaffner said in a medical center news release. Before going into a pool, always take a shower. Anyone who has had stomach ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Bacterial Skin Infection, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea

New Test Help Detect Drug-Resistant Bacteria

Posted 1 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 30, 2016 – The Xpert Carba-R Assay diagnostic, which tests patient specimens for genetic markers associated with drug-resistant bacteria, has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The test specifically looks for bacteria resistant to Carbapenem antibiotics, powerful drugs typically given in hospitals to treat severe infections. Standard methods require the organisms to be grown and tested in lab cultures, which can take four days or longer, the FDA said in a news release. However, the agency stressed the new test only determines the presence of certain genetic markers, not for the actual resistant bacteria. It advised that hospitals should continue to use culture-based testing to confirm findings from the new test. In two clinical studies involving more than 1,100 people, the new test was found to be as effective as culture-based testing in evaluating ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Bacterial Skin Infection, Skin and Structure Infection

Contaminated Gloves a No-No in Hospitals

Posted 25 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 24, 2016 – Health care workers who wear contaminated gloves can transfer bacteria onto hospital surfaces, a new study warns. "Infection control is a priority for all hospitals to reduce the spread of [bacteria]," said study author Sae Otani, a master course student at Bunkyo Gakuin University in Japan. "Gloving is recommended as a barrier protection for health care workers to reduce the risk of contamination during contact with infectious sputum [saliva], urine and body fluids," but not changing or removing contaminated gloves carries a high risk of transmitting harmful germs, she noted in a news release from the American Society for Microbiology (ASM). For the study, Otani and her colleagues contaminated examination gloves with certain types of bacteria found in hospitals and other health care facilities. They then touched the gloves to a sterilized polypropylene surface. ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Bacterial Skin Infection

Page 1 2 3 Next

Ask a Question

Further Information

Related Condition Support Groups

Bacterial Infection

Related Drug Support Groups

Bactrim, Bactrim DS, sulfamethoxazole / trimethoprim, Neosporin, Septra, Triple Antibiotic, SMZ-TMP DS, Septra DS, Sulfatrim, view more... tea tree, Sulfatrim Pediatric, Cotrim, Cortisporin Cream, Antibiotic with Pramoxine, Triple Antibiotic Plus, Lanabiotic, Cortisporin Ointment, Septa, A + D Cracked Skin Relief, Bactrim IV, Cotrim DS, Bethaprim, Bactrim Pediatric, Topicycline, Neo-Synalar, Spectrocin Plus, Co-trimoxazole, Mercuroclear, First Aid Antiseptic, Duospore, Medi-Quik, Bethaprim Pediatric, Cotrim Pediatric, Septra IV, Uroplus DS, Uroplus, bacitracin / neomycin / polymyxin b / pramoxine, neomycin / polymyxin b / pramoxine, Polytracin, Betadine Antibiotic, Tribiotic Plus, benzalkonium chloride / lidocaine, fluocinolone / neomycin, Baciguent