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The Neighborhood Sandbox: A Breeding Ground for Germs

Posted 19 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 7, 2017 – Kids love to play in sandboxes, and it helps them develop motor and social skills. But have you ever considered what kind of germs might be lurking in that communal sand? Sandboxes can be breeding grounds for bacteria, parasites and other infectious germs, whether brought in by animals using them as litter boxes or by kids interacting with other kids, researchers say. Dr. Marc Siegel, a professor of medicine at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City, describes sandboxes as "swimming pools without disinfecting chlorine." In a new study, researchers found that a particularly nasty bacteria called Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) was present in nearly 53 percent of sandboxes tested in Spain. "We do not consider our paper as alarming," said lead researcher Dr. Jose Blanco, from the department of animal health at Complutense University of Madrid. "We have a ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Bacterial Skin Infection, Skin and Structure Infection, Clostridial Infection, Bacteremia, Whipworm Infection, Prevention of Clostridium Difficile Infection Recurrence, Helminthic Infection, Worms and Flukes

Hospital Room Floors May Harbor 'Superbugs'

Posted 2 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 2, 2017 – Hospital room floors may be more of a "superbug" threat than many hospital staffers realize, new research suggests. "Efforts to improve disinfection in the hospital environment usually focus on surfaces that are frequently touched by the hands of health care workers or patients," explained lead researcher Dr. Abhishek Deshpande, from the Cleveland Clinic, in Ohio. "Although health care facility floors are often heavily contaminated, limited attention has been paid to disinfection of floors because they are not frequently touched," Deshpande added. Yet, items in a patient's room can come into contact with the floor, which can lead to the transfer of multidrug-resistant bacteria to hands, clothing, call buttons, medical devices, linens and medical supplies, the researchers explained. In their study, the team took samples from the floors of 159 patient rooms in ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Bacterial Skin Infection, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection, Bacteremia, Wound Infection

'Superbug' Infections Striking More U.S. Kids

Posted 24 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Feb. 24, 2017 – A type of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infection has increased 700 percent in American children since 2007, a new investigation reveals. These infections are caused by Enterobacteriaceae bacteria – normal bacteria that can become resistant to multiple drugs. Once confined to hospitals, the tough-to-treat infections are spreading into the community at large, say researchers who evaluated eight years of data. These infections are associated with longer hospital stays and probably greater risk of death, the researchers said. "Antibiotic resistance increasingly threatens our ability to treat our children's infections," said study author Dr. Sharon Meropol. "Efforts to control this trend are urgently needed from all of us, such as using antibiotics only when necessary, and eliminating agricultural use of antibiotics in healthy animals," added Meropol. She's a ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Cipro, Ciprofloxacin, Augmentin, Levaquin, Bacterial Skin Infection, Clavulanate, Levofloxacin, Amoxicillin/Clavulanate, Avelox, Neomycin, Gentamicin, Tobramycin, Ofloxacin, Moxifloxacin, Amikacin, Bacteremia, Ertapenem, Amoclan

'Superbug' Infections Down 30 Percent at VA Hospitals

Posted 7 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Jan. 6, 2017 – Rates of a deadly "superbug" called methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA, have dropped steadily at hospitals and long-term care health care facilities run by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs over the past eight years, according to a new report. Between 2007 and 2015, rates of monthly MRSA infections rates fell 37 percent in VA intensive care units. Infections in non-ICUs fell by about 30 percent, the study found. Even larger reductions were seen in overall health care-acquired infections, which declined 80 percent or more in both ICUs and non-ICUs, researchers reported. "We speculate that active surveillance was the primary driver of the downward trends seen in the VA," said study lead author Dr. Martin Evans, who is with the agency. "Understanding how and why rates of MRSA have diminished in recent years is essential for the continued ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Bacterial Skin Infection, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection, Bacteremia, Gram Negative Infection

'Superbug' Common Among N.C. Hog Workers, Study Says

Posted 18 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 18, 2016 – Some workers at hog production facilities in the United States have skin infections from drug-resistant "superbugs," researchers report. Hogs are given antibiotics to speed their growth. But, overuse of the drugs has been linked to the development of bacteria that don't respond to many antibiotics commonly used to treat staph infections, the researchers said in background notes. "This study suggests that carrying these bacteria may not always be harmless to humans," said study leader Christopher Heaney. He's an assistant professor with the Bloomberg School of Public Health at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. Previously, it was known that many hog workers had these bacteria in their noses, but it wasn't clear if the workers were at increased risk of infection, Heaney said. This study included 103 hog facility workers in North Carolina and 80 child and adult ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Skin Infection, Bacterial Skin Infection, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection, Bacteremia

More U.S. Kids Getting Drug-Resistant Infections

Posted 17 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 17, 2016 – Antibiotic-resistant infections are on the rise among American children, a new study finds. Researchers analyzed blood samples collected from kids aged 1 to 17 who received outpatient, inpatient, intensive care unit and long-term care between 1999 and 2012. During that time, the rates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria samples that were resistant to at least three types of antibiotics rose from about 15 percent to 26 percent, the investigators found. Meanwhile, the rate of bacteria samples resistant to carbapenems – a class of antibiotics considered one of the treatments of last resort for highly resistant infections – rose from just over 9 percent to 20 percent. Drug resistance was more common among children in intensive care units, those aged 13 to 17, and those in the Midwest, the findings showed. The study offers more evidence of the need for aggressive ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection, Bacteremia

Fast Action Can Prevent Sepsis Death: CDC

Posted 23 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 23, 2016 – Many cases of life-threatening sepsis could be recognized and treated long before it causes severe illness or death, U.S. health officials report. Sepsis, or septicemia, occurs when the body has an extreme response to an infection. Without prompt treatment, organ failure can quickly follow. Researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that about 70 percent of patients with sepsis had used health care services recently or had chronic diseases that required regular medical care. That means there are many opportunities for health care providers to intercept sepsis along its potentially deadly course, according to the CDC report. "When sepsis occurs, it should be treated as a medical emergency," CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden said in an agency news release. "Doctors and nurses can prevent sepsis and also the devastating effects of ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Sepsis, Bacteremia, Septicemia, Wound Cleansing, Wound Debridement, Wound Sepsis

Theravance Biopharma Announces FDA Approval of Expanded Label for Vibativ (telavancin)

Posted 10 May 2016 by Drugs.com

DUBLIN, IRELAND – (Marketwired) – 05/09/16 – Theravance Biopharma, Inc. (NASDAQ: TBPH) ("Theravance Biopharma" or the "Company") today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the Company's supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) for Vibativ (telavancin) to expand the product's label to include data describing the treatment of patients with concurrent Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) bacteremia in both of the antibiotic's currently approved indications in the United States. Vibativ is approved in the U.S. for the treatment of adult patients with hospital-acquired and ventilator-associated bacterial pneumonia (HABP/VABP) caused by susceptible isolates of S. aureus when alternative treatments are not suitable. In addition, Vibativ is approved in the U.S. for the treatment of adult patients with complicated skin & skin structure infections (cSSSI) caused ... Read more

Related support groups: Pneumonia, Skin and Structure Infection, Bacteremia, Vibativ, Telavancin

Persistent Critical Illness May Keep Patients From Leaving ICU

Posted 5 May 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 4, 2016 – A small group of patients uses one-third of intensive care unit resources, a new study contends. Researchers analyzed data from more than one million ICU patients in Australia and New Zealand, and found that just 5 percent of them accounted for 33 percent of all days that ICU beds got used. These are critically ill patients who go from one health crisis to another and may never get well enough to leave the ICU, according to the study authors. The findings could lead to better care and efforts to find ways to prevent patients from slipping into this situation, which the researchers called persistent critical illness. "We have found that this truly is a separate 'thing' – a state patients transition into where you're there because you're there, stuck in this cascade that we can't get you out of," said study leader Dr. Theodore Iwashyna. He is a University of ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Sepsis, Bacteremia, Septicemia, ICU Agitation, Wound Sepsis

Post-Op Bacterial Infection Raises Odds for Complications, Death

Posted 25 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 25, 2015 – People recuperating from surgery are much more likely to die or develop complications if they become infected with a dangerous diarrhea-causing bacteria, a new study suggests. Patients at VA hospitals who contracted Clostridium difficile following surgery were five times more likely to die and 12 times more likely to suffer a complication of the heart, lung, kidneys or nervous system, according to findings published online Nov. 25 in the journal JAMA Surgery. "C. difficile infection is a big hit to take for people who are already behind the eight-ball," said Dr. Brian Zuckerbraun, a surgeon at the VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System who co-wrote an accompanying editorial. "It's just a big insult to their system, when they are vulnerable." C. difficile is a tough and opportunistic bacteria that can invade the intestines of people whose gut bacteria have been wiped ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Surgery, Bacterial Infection, Bacterial Skin Infection, Clostridial Infection, Bacteremia

Small Hospitals Seeing More Drug-Resistant E. Coli Infections

Posted 14 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14, 2015 – Drug-resistant E. coli infections are on the increase in small community hospitals, where more than half of U.S. patients receive their health care, researchers report. The researchers analyzed data from 26 hospitals in the Southeast, and found that cases of drug-resistant E. coli infections doubled from 2009 to 2014 – from slightly more than 5 per 100,000 patients to 10.5 per 100,000 patients. The median, or midpoint, age of patients infected with this E. coli strain was 72, according to the study published online Oct. 13 in the journal Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology. "We have always considered antibiotic-resistant organisms a problem at large hospitals," senior study author Dr. Deverick Anderson, an infectious disease specialist at Duke University School of Medicine in Durham, N.C., said in a university news release. "This study goes a long way ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Skin Infection, Bacterial Skin Infection, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Bacteremia, Adjunct to Antibiotic Therapy

New Antibiotic-Resistant 'Superbug' an Emerging Threat, CDC Says

Posted 5 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 – A relatively new antibiotic-resistant bacteria called CRE is making inroads in some major American cities, U.S. health officials report. Surveillance of seven U.S. metropolitan areas found higher-than-expected levels of CRE in Atlanta, Baltimore and New York City, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Lower-than-expected levels were found in Albuquerque, Denver and Portland, Ore., while the Minneapolis rate was what the agency anticipated. But CDC researchers were dismayed that they found active cases of CRE infection in every city they examined, said senior author Dr. Alexander Kallen, a CDC medical officer. The results support the CDC's decision to promote coordinated regional efforts to prevent the spread of CRE and other antibiotic-resistant germs, Kallen said. "Here we are with an opportunity to intervene on one of these ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Metronidazole, Bacterial Infection, Bactrim, Flagyl, Bacterial Skin Infection, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection, Bactrim DS, Sulfamethoxazole/Trimethoprim, Xifaxan, Polymyxin B, Skin and Structure Infection, Septra, Metro, Bacitracin, Rifaximin, SMZ-TMP DS, Septra DS, Sulfatrim, Chloramphenicol

For Endoscopes Tied to Serious Infections, Current Cleaning Methods Not Enough

Posted 5 Aug 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 5, 2015 – Recent outbreaks of dangerous infections tied to endoscopic devices called duodenoscopes have grabbed headlines, and in March the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued strict guidelines on how best to disinfect the devices. On Tuesday, the FDA announced extra cleaning measures for the devices, which are used to examine the interior of the digestive tract. But a new study finds that 100-percent disinfection may simply not be possible under the recommended protocols. Even after what seems to be a thorough cleaning and disinfection, potentially harmful bacteria can survive on endoscopes, researchers reported. "Colonoscopes and gastroscopes can harbor residual organic material, including viable microbes, even when adherence with recommended reprocessing guidelines is verified," concluded a team led by Cori Ofstead, of Ofstead & Associates in St. Paul, Minn. In ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Colonoscopy, Endoscopy, Bacteremia, Diagnosis and Investigation, Endoscopy or Radiology Premedication

Better Control of Drug-Resistant Germs Could Save Thousands of Lives: CDC

Posted 4 Aug 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 4, 2015 – An immediate, focused effort to halt the spread of antibiotic-resistant germs could save tens of thousands of lives and prevent hundreds of thousands of new infections over the next five years, a new government report suggests. As many as 37,000 lives could be saved, and 619,000 new infections prevented, if community health departments and health care facilities form tight support networks to quickly identify and address emerging outbreaks of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, said report author Dr. John Jernigan. He directs the Office of HAI (Health care-Associated Infections) Prevention Research and Evaluation at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "When health care facilities and health departments in a community work together to share information about resistance, and then use that information to guide and target prevention efforts, then we ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Amoxicillin, Metronidazole, Doxycycline, Bacterial Infection, Clindamycin, Azithromycin, Bactrim, Cipro, Ciprofloxacin, Augmentin, Levaquin, Flagyl, Zithromax, Trimethoprim, Sulfamethoxazole, Nitrofurantoin, Erythromycin, Clarithromycin, Minocycline

Health Tip: Why Antibiotic Resistance Is Serious

Posted 16 Nov 2011 by Drugs.com

-- Antibiotic resistance occurs when a bacterium mutates and becomes immune to the effects of a specific antibiotic. You can help prevent antibiotic resistance by taking an antibiotic regimen only when necessary. Remember that antibiotics don't work against viral infections such as a cold or the flu. If you do begin taking an antibiotic, you should never skip a dose. Also, you should finish the entire amount that your doctor has prescribed, despite the fact that you might be feeling better. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says antibiotic-resistant bacteria are dangerous because: It may be difficult to find a medication that kills the bacteria. Resistant bacteria tend to spread more quickly between families and within communities. Infections become more difficult and more expensive to treat. People may die from a resistant infection before it can be treated ... Read more

Related support groups: Amoxicillin, Metronidazole, Doxycycline, Bacterial Infection, Clindamycin, Cephalexin, Azithromycin, Bactrim, Penicillin, Cipro, Ciprofloxacin, Augmentin, Levaquin, Flagyl, Keflex, Zithromax, Trimethoprim, Sulfamethoxazole, Nitrofurantoin, Erythromycin

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