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Related terms: Vascular Dementia, Multi-infarct Dementia

High, Low Levels of Magnesium Linked to Dementia Risk

Posted 2 days 5 hours ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 20, 2017 – Having magnesium levels that are too high or too low may put you at risk for Alzheimer's and other dementias, Dutch researchers report. In a study of more than 9,500 men and women, the highest or lowest levels of magnesium appeared to increase the chances for dementia by as much as 30 percent. "At this moment, magnesium levels are not routinely measured in daily clinical practice," said lead researcher Dr. Brenda Kieboom, of Erasmus University Medical Center in Rotterdam. "If our study results are replicated, magnesium levels could be used to screen for dementia, especially in people at risk for low magnesium levels." But she cautioned that "we cannot prove that low or high magnesium causes dementia on the basis of our data. For that, we need studies to see if supplements will reduce the risk." Kieboom said she also wants to study whether low magnesium ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Diagnosis and Investigation, Alcoholic Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features, Lewy Body Dementia

Heath Tip: Myths About the Aging Brain

Posted 11 days ago by Drugs.com

-- Scientists are uncovering new information about the human brain every day. But misinformation still abounds. The Global Council on Brain Health recently examined and disproved these myths about the aging brain: MYTH: Older people can't learn new things. TRUTH: Something as simple as meeting new friends and remembering their names is enough to simulate the brain and keep it active. Going back to school or trying a new hobby are other ways to improve brain health. MYTH: You're stuck with the brain you were born with. TRUTH: While many pathways for learning are created before birth, new pathways can be created in the parts of the brain that handle memory and learning. MYTH: Experts don't have a clue about how the brain works. TRUTH: The brain is one of the human body's most complicated organs. But scientists are learning a tremendous amount about the brain all the time. New treatments ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Diagnosis and Investigation, Dementia with Depressive Features, Lewy Body Dementia

Do Fewer Nightly Dreams Mean Higher Dementia Risk in Seniors?

Posted 23 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 23, 2017 – Seniors who spend less time each night in the dream stage of sleep may be more likely to succumb to dementia as they age, new research suggests. Known as rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, this critical phase "occurs in intervals throughout the night, and is characterized by more dreaming and rapid eye movements," explained study author Matthew Pase. He is a senior research fellow with Swinburne University of Technology in Australia, and a visiting researcher in the department of neurology at Boston University School of Medicine. "We found that persons experiencing less REM sleep over the course of a night displayed an increased risk of developing dementia in the future," Pase said. He noted that for every 1 percent drop in REM sleep, the seniors in his study saw their dementia and Alzheimer's disease risk go up by about 9 percent. While prior research has ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Head Imaging

Dementia Care: A Huge Financial Burden for U.S. Families

Posted 22 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 22, 2017 – Caring for a family member with a neurological disorder such as dementia is vastly more expensive than caring for a senior who is dementia-free, a new study finds. The average yearly cost of caring for a dementia-free senior is roughly $137,000. But the price tag rises to $321,000 for care of those struggling with dementia. And about 70 percent of that yearly cost ultimately falls on the shoulders of the family members rather than insurance, the researchers said. The rest of the cost typically splits evenly between Medicare and Medicaid. "A lot of people, I think, believe that Medicare will pay for their long-term care," said lead author Eric Jutkowitz, an assistant professor at Brown University's School of Public Health. "That's not the case. Private long-term care insurance may help, but benefits can be exhausted and few families have policies. For a disease ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features, Lewy Body Dementia, Alcoholic Dementia, Drug-Induced Dementia

Traveling With Dementia: Tips for Family Caregivers

Posted 3 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 2, 2017 – Traveling with a loved one who has dementia requires special preparation. The Alzheimer's Foundation of America has some advice. "Traveling is a fun and enjoyable way to reenergize your body and mind. It can be beneficial to people living with dementia and their family caregivers under the proper circumstances," said Charles Fuschillo Jr., foundation president and CEO. "Before going on a trip, there are important steps family caregivers should take to ensure that their loved ones will be safe, comfortable and able to make the journey," he added in a foundation news release. First you should talk with the person's doctor to find out if travel is recommended or safe. In the early stages of dementia, travel may still be enjoyable. But it can become overwhelming as dementia progresses, the foundation said. When deciding how and where to travel, make choices that ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Alcoholic Dementia, Head Imaging, Dementia with Depressive Features, Lewy Body Dementia

Moving From 'Stroke Belt' Doesn't Undo Higher Dementia Risk

Posted 31 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 31, 2017 – Health problems for people born in the so-called Stroke Belt of the United States also include a higher risk of developing dementia – even if they move elsewhere, a new study suggests. Researchers who calculated data on thousands of adults living in northern California found dementia risk was roughly 26 percent higher for those born in nine states, nearly all in the Southeast. Blacks, in particular, were at an increased risk for dementia if they started life in: Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Tennessee, South Carolina and West Virginia, said study author Paola Gilsanz. "We already know that living in certain states in the U.S. is associated with poorer health outcomes," said Gilsanz, a research fellow at Kaiser Permanente Northern California division of research in Oakland. "This study contributes to a growing body of evidence that ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Ischemic Stroke, High Cholesterol, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Transient Ischemic Attack, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Dementia with Depressive Features, Alcoholic Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia

Can Daily Crossword Protect You From Dementia?

Posted 17 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 17, 2017 – Doing a crossword puzzle every day may help keep your brain sharp as you age, researchers report. The British study of people aged 50 and older found the more often they did word puzzles, the higher they scored on attention, reasoning and memory tests. "We found direct relationships between the frequency of word puzzle use and the speed and accuracy of performance on nine cognitive tasks assessing a range of aspects of function including attention, reasoning and memory," said researcher Keith Wesnes. He's a professor of cognitive neuroscience at the University of Exeter in England. Performance was consistently better in those who reported engaging in puzzles, and generally improved incrementally with the frequency of puzzle use, he said. "For example, on test measures of grammatical reasoning speed and short-term memory accuracy, performing word puzzles was ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features, Arteriosclerotic Dementia w/ Depressive Features, Drug-Induced Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia

A Healthy Diet May Help Ward Off Dementia

Posted 17 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 17, 2017 – Eating right may help protect your brain health in old age, a group of new studies show, according to four new studies. In particular, the Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay (MIND) diet lowered people's risk of dementia, two studies concluded. The MIND diet is a hybrid of the Mediterranean diet and the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diets, both of which were originally designed to help improve heart health. Seniors who carefully followed the MIND diet had a 35 percent lower risk of declining brain function as they aged. Even people who halfheartedly adhered to a MIND diet reduced their risk of brain decline between 18 to 24 percent. "We've always been saying that a healthy heart is a healthy brain," said Dean Hartley, director of science initiatives for the Alzheimer's Association. "Your brain uses 20 percent of your ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Weight Loss, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia, Drug-Induced Dementia

One Social Hour a Week Can Help Someone With Dementia

Posted 16 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, July 16, 2017 – Just a slight increase in social interaction benefits older adults with dementia and lowers health care costs, a new British study suggests. "People with dementia who are living in [nursing] homes are among the most vulnerable in our society," said study leader Clive Ballard. He's a professor at the University of Exeter Medical School in England. "Our outcomes show that good staff training and just one hour a week of social interaction significantly improves quality of life for a group of people who can often be forgotten by society," Ballard said in a university news release. The study included more than 800 dementia patients living in 69 nursing homes in the U.K. Two staff members at each home were trained to engage in simple social activities with the patients. This included talking to them about their interests and decisions about their care. When combined ... Read more

Related support groups: Social Anxiety Disorder, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features, Drug-Induced Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia

Working Too Much Might Tip Heart Into Irregular Rhythm

Posted 14 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 14, 2017 – Working long hours might do more than exhaust you – it could also raise your risk of a common and potentially dangerous heart rhythm disorder, a new British study finds. "These findings show that long working hours are associated with an increased risk of atrial fibrillation, the most common cardiac arrhythmia," said study leader Mika Kivimaki, a professor of epidemiology at University College London. Because atrial fibrillation has long been a known risk factor for stroke, "this could be one of the mechanisms that explain the previously observed increased risk of stroke among those working long hours," Kivimaki said in a news release from the European Heart Journal. His team published their findings in the journal on July 14. One cardiologist in the United States said that because the study couldn't prove cause-and-effect, its results "need to be interpreted ... Read more

Related support groups: Atrial Fibrillation, Heart Disease, Ischemic Stroke, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Prevention of Thromboembolism in Atrial Fibrillation, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Ischemic Heart Disease, Lewy Body Dementia

Severe Head Injury May Raise Dementia Risk Years Later

Posted 5 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 5, 2017 – A severe head injury, especially during middle age, could dramatically boost the risk for developing dementia later in life, new research from Finland suggests. The investigation tracked dementia risk among people who had suffered a traumatic brain injury [TBI] at 65 or younger. Ultimately, the researchers determined that not only did the risk go up for those who had a TBI, but the worse the initial head injury, the greater the risk of dementia. "The study showed that 3.5 percent of persons with moderate-to-severe TBI [were] diagnosed with a neurodegenerative disease [such as dementia] later in life," said study lead author Dr. Rahul Raj. He's an associate professor of experimental neurosurgery at Helsinki University Hospital. "This is substantially higher compared to age-matched peers with no history of brain injury," he noted. By comparison, "only 1.6 ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Head Injury, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Head Injury with Intracranial Hemorrhage, Head Injury w/ Intracranial Hemorrhage and Loss of Consciousness, Head Injury with Loss of Consciousness, Dementia with Depressive Features, Lewy Body Dementia, Arteriosclerotic Dementia w/ Depressive Features

Boozing Can Age You Right Down to Your Cells

Posted 26 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, June 26, 2017 – The more you booze it up, the more your cells age, increasing your risk for age-related health problems like heart disease, diabetes, cancer and dementia, a new study suggests. Researchers studied 134 alcoholics between the ages of 41 and 85 and a control group of people in the same age group who weren't alcoholics. DNA samples revealed that the alcoholics had shortened telomeres. "Telomeres, the protein caps on the ends of human chromosomes, are markers of aging and overall health," said study leader Dr. Naruhisa Yamaki, a clinical fellow at the Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine in Japan. Every time a cell replicates, a tiny bit of telomere is lost, so they get shorter with age. As time passes, that leaves chromosomes less protected so cells may be unable to function properly. But some people have shorter telomeres for reasons other than aging. "Our ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Cancer, Heart Disease, Dementia, Alcohol Dependence, Alzheimer's Disease, Alcohol Withdrawal, Pre-Diabetes, Alcoholism, Hangover, Diabetes Mellitus, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Ischemic Heart Disease, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Alcoholic Cardiomyopathy, Alcoholic Psychosis, Alcoholic Dementia, Acute Alcohol Intoxication

Lifestyle Changes Might Prevent or Slow Dementia

Posted 22 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 22, 2017 – Simple changes to your lifestyle might delay the start of dementia or slow its progression, a new report suggests. Some scientific evidence indicates that keeping your mind active through "cognitive training," controlling your blood pressure and exercising more may pay dividends in terms of brain health, researchers determined. Although not yet proven to thwart the cognitive decline that accompanies aging or dementia, the public should have access to this information, said Alan Leshner. He led the committee at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine that compiled the report. "There are a few domains where the evidence that does exist suggests they might have an effect," said Leshner. "At least two of those, we know, are good for a whole lot of other things that people do or that they could suffer from. That's controlling your blood ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Hypertensive Emergency, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Lewy Body Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features, Arteriosclerotic Dementia w/ Depressive Features

Even Moderate Drinking May Dull the Aging Brain

Posted 7 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, June 6, 2017 – People who drink at even moderate levels may see some of their mental skills slip faster as they age, a new study suggests. The researchers found that those who regularly drank alcohol showed greater brain shrinkage than non-drinkers by old age. They also lost more of their language "fluency" – a measure of memory and thinking skills. And, the effects were seen even among people who drank "moderately" – roughly four to seven drinks a week, the researchers found. The findings do not prove that alcohol was to blame. But experts said they add to evidence that moderate drinking is not as healthful as many like to believe. "People should be skeptical of the idea that it's actually healthy, and treat alcohol with respect," said Tim Stockwell, director of the Center for Addictions Research at the University of Victoria, in British Columbia, Canada. Stockwell, who was ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alcohol Dependence, Alzheimer's Disease, Alcoholism, Hangover, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia, Acute Alcohol Intoxication, Alcoholic Dementia

Persistent Pain May Lead to Memory Troubles

Posted 6 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, June 6, 2017 – Pain that continues, day in and day out, may trigger an unexpected and unwanted side effect – a bigger risk of mental decline and dementia, a new study suggests. The findings suggest that chronic pain may be related to changes in the brain that contribute to memory problems. The findings may also point to new ways to protect age-related mental decline, the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) researchers said. However, it's important to note that the study wasn't designed to prove a cause-and-effect relationship. It can only show an association between pain and memory issues. The study included information on more than 10,000 people. All of the study participants were 60 and older. Those who had moderate or severe chronic pain in both 1998 and 2000 had more than a 9 percent faster decline on memory tests over the next 10 years than those who didn't ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Suboxone, Oxycodone, Back Pain, Hydrocodone, Tramadol, Percocet, Methadone, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Chronic Pain, Opana, Ibuprofen, Neuralgia, Naproxen

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