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Related terms: Vascular Dementia with Depression, Multi-infarct Dementia with Depression

Acupuncture May Slow Pre-Dementia Memory Loss: Study

Posted 5 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 4, 2016 – Acupuncture may benefit people who have memory loss, but don't yet have dementia, suggests a review by Chinese researchers of five earlier studies. Nothing has yet been proven to halt the progression to dementia in those who are destined to progress. But, acupuncture used alone or along with another treatment, such as the medication nimodipine, might help retain some memory function, the researchers said. But several doctors not involved with the review said it was too soon to say that acupuncture might be effective against dementia. For the study, Min Deng and Xu-Feng Wang, from Wuhan University in China, reviewed five previously published studies done in 2012 and 2013. The trials included nearly 600 people with mild cognitive impairment, a type of memory loss that's considered pre-dementia. About 5 percent to 10 percent of people with mild cognitive ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Drug-Induced Dementia, Arteriosclerotic Dementia w/ Depressive Features, Dementia with Depressive Features, Lewy Body Dementia, Alcoholic Dementia

2 in 10 Alzheimer's Cases May Be Misdiagnosed

Posted 26 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 26, 2016 – Alzheimer's disease is often misdiagnosed, possibly causing undue stress for those who don't have the disease but are told they do, and delays in treatment for others, two new studies reveal. Although no cure or effective treatment for Alzheimer's disease exists, a correct diagnosis is essential because some drugs can delay its progress and help preserve quality of life for as long as possible. An early diagnosis also gives patients time to plan for their end-of-life care, experts say. "There are drugs that are beneficial for at least a short amount of time that can be given at a very early stage and possibly boost memory," said Dean Hartley, director of science initiatives, medical and scientific relations at the Alzheimer's Association. "Planning your care and finances is extremely important," he said. "With a correct diagnosis people can also be put into a ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Parkinson's Disease, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Diagnosis and Investigation, Alcoholic Dementia, Arteriosclerotic Dementia w/ Depressive Features, Drug-Induced Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features, Lewy Body Dementia

Does Dementia Diagnosis Have Silver Lining for Some?

Posted 26 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 26, 2016 – Is it possible that a diagnosis as devastating as dementia could have some positive effects? Yes, a small study suggests. Researchers asked 48 people with early dementia or mild cognitive impairment to complete a questionnaire that measured their quality of life and personal outlook after getting their diagnosis. The "Silver Lining Questionnaire" was designed to measure how much patients believe their illness has a positive impact in areas such as: relationships, appreciation for life, positive influence on others, inner strength and life philosophy. The questionnaire has been used before with cancer patients. But, this was the first time it was used with dementia/mild cognitive impairment patients, the researchers said. "The overall assumption is that this diagnosis would have a uniformly negative impact on a patient's outlook on life, but we were surprised to ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Diagnosis and Investigation, Dementia with Depressive Features, Arteriosclerotic Dementia w/ Depressive Features, Lewy Body Dementia, Alcoholic Dementia, Drug-Induced Dementia

'Managing' Elderly Patients Without Powerful Antipsychotics

Posted 26 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 25, 2016 – About 25 percent of dementia patients in U.S. nursing homes are still quieted with risky antipsychotic medications. Now, a small study suggests that managing these difficult patients, instead of medicating them, could obtain better results. "Drugs have a place, but should not be first-line treatments. They don't work well, and there are side effects," said study author Dr. Henry Brodaty, a professor of aging and mental health at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia. Antipsychotic drugs such as Risperdal (risperidone), Abilify (aripiprazole) and Seroquel (quetiapine) are approved to treat serious psychiatric conditions such as bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. But in seniors, they're often used to calm aggressive or violent behavior linked to dementia. "They're basically a sedative," said Dean Hartley, director of science initiatives with the ... Read more

Related support groups: Bipolar Disorder, Seroquel, Abilify, Mania, Schizophrenia, Latuda, Risperdal, Dementia, Zyprexa, Risperidone, Quetiapine, Schizoaffective Disorder, Geodon, Seroquel XR, Saphris, Alzheimer's Disease, Olanzapine, Invega, Clozapine, Compazine

Why Some Seniors Don't Take Their Meds

Posted 1 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 30, 2016 – Anyone who's helped care for an aging loved one knows that managing their daily medications can be a challenge. Now, new research suggests that the problem of missed pills rises with age and failing memory, especially for men. The problem can have serious consequences, the study's lead author noted. "Health conditions may worsen or not improve if older adults skip or don't take their medications properly," said Brenda Jamerson, of the Center on Biobehavioral Health Disparities Research at Duke University, in Durham, N.C. "Serious side effects may also occur from taking medications at the wrong time or in the wrong dose," Jamerson said in a news release from the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, which published the findings earlier this month. The research involved more than 4,100 North Carolina residents aged 65 and older. All had health conditions ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Drug-Induced Dementia, Arteriosclerotic Dementia w/ Depressive Features, Dementia with Depressive Features, Lewy Body Dementia, Alcoholic Dementia

Delays in Spotting Dementia Can Bring Dangers

Posted 2 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 2, 2016 – A delay in diagnosing dementia can put people at risk, a new study suggests. People who have signs of probable dementia but haven't yet been formally diagnosed are nearly twice as likely as those who've been diagnosed to be performing potentially unsafe activities such as cooking, driving, and managing their medications and finances. The study included information from more than 7,600 Americans. All were 65 or older. The findings showed: About 17 percent of people diagnosed with dementia and 28 percent of undiagnosed people were still driving. Twelve percent of diagnosed people and 29 percent of undiagnosed people kept handling their finances. Seventeen percent of diagnosed people and 42 percent of undiagnosed people continued to cook meals for themselves. Nearly 22 percent of diagnosed people and 50 percent of undiagnosed people were still handling their own ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Diagnosis and Investigation, Drug-Induced Dementia, Arteriosclerotic Dementia w/ Depressive Features, Lewy Body Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features

Blood Pressure Swings Linked to Faster Decline in Mental Skills

Posted 23 May 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 23, 2016 – Fluctuations in blood pressure may be linked to faster declines in thinking skills among seniors, a new study suggests. Among older patients, those whose systolic blood pressure – the top number in a blood pressure reading – varied between doctor's visits showed more rapid mental deterioration and loss of verbal memory than those whose blood pressure stayed within normal ranges, researchers found. Variability in the bottom number – diastolic blood pressure – was also associated with faster decline of mental ability among those aged 55 to 64, but not among people aged 65 and older, the study authors added. "The relevance of blood pressure variability between doctor's visits has been dismissed until recently," said study author Bo Qin, a postdoctoral associate at Rutgers Cancer Institute, in New Brunswick, N.J. "However, over the past six years, evidence has ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Hypertensive Emergency, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Lewy Body Dementia, Arteriosclerotic Dementia w/ Depressive Features

Why Pleasant Mealtimes Could Be Key to Alzheimer's Care

Posted 17 May 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 17, 2016 – Making meals more enjoyable for people with dementia might reduce their risk of malnutrition and dehydration, researchers report. Family-style meals and music, in particular, showed promise for improving eating and drinking habits, British researchers found. "It is probably not just what people with dementia eat and drink that is important for their nutritional well-being and quality of life – but a holistic mix of where they eat and drink, the atmosphere, physical and social support offered, the understanding of formal caregivers, and levels of physical activity enjoyed," said lead researcher Lee Hooper, of the University of East Anglia. The researchers assessed various ways of improving food and fluid intake among more than 2,200 people with dementia. "The risk of dehydration and malnutrition are high in older people, but even higher in those with dementia," ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Arteriosclerotic Dementia w/ Depressive Features, Lewy Body Dementia

Meditation May Sharpen Memory

Posted 10 May 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 10, 2016 – A regular meditation practice might benefit older adults beginning to notice memory problems, a small pilot study finds. The study focused on 25 older adults deemed to have mild cognitive impairment – problems with memory and thinking that may, in some cases, progress to dementia. Researchers randomly assigned them to either 12 weeks of meditation and other yoga practices, or 12 weeks of memory enhancement training – which taught strategies for improving forgetfulness. In the end, the study found, both groups did a little better on tests of verbal memory – the kind involved in remembering names or lists of words, for example. But the meditation group showed a bigger change, on average, in tests of visual-spatial memory – which is needed for navigating while walking or driving, or trying to recall a location. The meditators also showed fewer symptoms of ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Arteriosclerotic Dementia w/ Depressive Features, Lewy Body Dementia

Seniors' Worsening Depression May Sometimes Predict Dementia

Posted 30 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, April 29, 2016 – In some cases, worsening symptoms of depression in seniors might point to early dementia, a new study suggests. The Dutch study can't prove cause-and-effect, and certainly not every depressed senior is headed for dementia. But experts said the findings are intriguing. "More research is needed, but the study raises the possibility of an overlap between the pathology of dementia and depression," said Dr. Gisele Wolf-Klein, who reviewed the findings. She directs geriatric education at Northwell Health in New Hyde Park, N.Y. The study was led by Dr. M Arfan Ikram, an epidemiologist at Erasmus University Medical Center in Rotterdam. His team tracked depression symptoms in more than 3,300 adults, aged 55 and older, in the Netherlands for 11 years. The patients were then monitored for signs of dementia for another 10 years. During that follow-up, 434 of the ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Major Depressive Disorder, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Dysthymia, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Neurotic Depression, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Depressive Psychosis, Lewy Body Dementia, Arteriosclerotic Dementia w/ Depressive Features

HIV Patients Now Living Long Enough to Develop Alzheimer's

Posted 19 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 19, 2016 – The first case of Alzheimer's disease diagnosed in a person with HIV highlights the fact that long-time HIV survivors are starting to reach ages where their risk for Alzheimer's increases, researchers report. The 71-year-old man was diagnosed after a medical scan revealed amyloid protein clumps in his brain. Until now, it was believed that HIV-related inflammation in the brain might prevent the formation of such clumps and thereby protect these people from Alzheimer's. "This patient may be a sentinel case that disputes what we thought we knew about dementia in HIV-positive individuals," said study author Dr. R. Scott Turner. He is head of the Memory Disorders Program at Georgetown University Medical Center in Washington, D.C. The case also suggests that some older people with HIV and dementia may be misdiagnosed with HIV-associated brain disorders, but ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, HIV Infection, Alzheimer's Disease, Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia, Arteriosclerotic Dementia w/ Depressive Features

Alzheimer's Can Steal Ability to Know Loved Ones' Faces

Posted 13 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 13, 2016 – A new study sheds light on what is often called one of the cruelest effects of Alzheimer's disease – the patient's inability to recognize loved ones. Researchers report that along with causing memory loss, Alzheimer's also seems to affect people's visual perception – specifically their ability to recognize faces. The investigators tested a group of seniors with Alzheimer's, and a "control" group without the brain disease, to see how well they could perceive faces and cars in photos. The pictures were shown either upright or upside down. "The results for people with Alzheimer's were similar to those in the control group in terms of answer accuracy and the time to process the upside-down faces and cars," study author Sven Joubert, from the University of Montreal, said in a school news release. "To perform these tasks, the brain must perform a local analysis ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Diagnosis and Investigation, Visual Defect/Disturbance, Arteriosclerotic Dementia w/ Depressive Features, Lewy Body Dementia

Is Seniors' Dental Health Tied to Mental Health?

Posted 1 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, April 1, 2016 – There seems to be a link between poor oral health and age-related mental decline, researchers say. However, the researchers emphasized there is not enough evidence to prove a direct link between oral health and thinking ("cognitive") abilities. In a new report, investigators reviewed studies on oral health and cognition published between 1993 and 2013. Some of the studies found that oral health indicators – such as the number of teeth, the number of cavities and the presence of gum disease – was associated with a higher risk of mental decline or dementia, while other studies did not find any association. The study authors also noted that some of the findings based on the number of teeth or cavities were conflicting. The new review was published in the April 1 issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. Overall, "clinical evidence suggests that the ... Read more

Related support groups: Oral and Dental Conditions, Xerostomia, Dementia, Toothache, Alzheimer's Disease, Gingivitis, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Periodontitis, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Stomatitis, Prevention of Dental Caries, Lewy Body Dementia, Arteriosclerotic Dementia w/ Depressive Features

Caregivers Often Give Up Necessities to Cover Alzheimer's Costs

Posted 30 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 30, 2016 – Caring for someone with Alzheimer's disease means caregivers often skimp on their own food and medical care, and even sell their belongings to support their loved one, a new report released Wednesday shows. The centerpiece of the Alzheimer's Association's annual report was a nationwide survey detailing the heavy financial and emotional toll caregivers endure. According to the survey, caregivers were 28 percent more likely to eat less or go hungry, and one-fifth cut back on doctor visits. Nearly half of them cut back on their own expenses to afford dementia-related care. And more than one-third reduced their hours at work or quit their job to care for a loved one, losing an average of $15,000 in income. "Care contributors are making enormous personal and financial sacrifices, and these sacrifices are jeopardizing their own and their family's financial ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Arteriosclerotic Dementia w/ Depressive Features, Lewy Body Dementia

Exercise May Keep Your Brain 10 Years Younger, Study Suggests

Posted 24 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 23, 2016 – Older adults who exercise regularly could buy an extra decade of good brain functioning, a new study suggests. The study found that seniors who got moderate to intense exercise retained more of their mental skills over the next five years, versus older adults who got light exercise or none at all. On average, those less-active seniors showed an extra 10 years of "brain aging," the researchers said. The findings do not prove that exercise itself slows brain aging, cautioned senior researcher Dr. Clinton Wright, a neurologist at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. It's possible, he said, that there are other reasons why active older adults stayed mentally sharper. The researchers accounted for some of those other explanations – including people's education levels, smoking habits and health conditions such as high blood pressure and diabetes. ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Lewy Body Dementia, Arteriosclerotic Dementia w/ Depressive Features

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