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Related terms: Palpitations, Heart Palpitations

Energy Drinks May Give the Heart an Unhealthy Jolt

Posted 1 day 8 hours ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 26, 2017 – The surge from energy drinks can cause unhealthy changes in your heart rhythm and blood pressure that don't occur with other caffeinated beverages, a small new trial suggests. The blend of caffeine, sugar and herbal stimulants contained in energy drinks may causes changes in the heart's electrical system that can promote an abnormal and potentially dangerous heart rhythm, the researchers found. Energy drinks may also create a longer-lasting increase in a person's blood pressure, compared to caffeine, the trial results suggest. "Consumers should be aware that drinking an energy drink is not the same as drinking coffee or soda. There are differences," said lead researcher Emily Fletcher. She's a deputy pharmacy flight commander from David Grant U.S.A.F. Medical Center at Travis Air Force Base in California. "I would recommend only moderate consumption of ... Read more

Related support groups: Arrhythmia, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

Oktoberfest Study Links Boozing to Heart Woes

Posted 1 day 8 hours ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 26, 2017 – Drinking heavily over a short period of time can significantly boost the risk of an abnormal heart rhythm, even in healthy people, new German research suggests. The finding stems from a study done at Munich's Oktoberfest, a long-standing Bavarian beer festival held every autumn. Over a 16-day period in 2015, researchers tracked the heart health and drinking patterns of a group of more than 3,000 men and women. The investigators found that nearly a third of the group experienced an abnormal heart rhythm – or "cardiac arrhythmia" – at some point during the festival, a much higher percentage than usually seen among the general population. What's more, investigators calculated that, for every additional gram of alcohol consumed per kilogram of blood (above zero), arrhythmia risk rose by 75 percent. Study co-author Dr. Moritz Sinner, an assistant professor of ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Arrhythmia, Alcohol Dependence, Alcoholism, Hangover, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Acute Alcohol Intoxication

No Link Between Common Antibiotic, Irregular Heartbeat

Posted 10 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 18, 2017 – The widely used antibiotic azithromycin doesn't increase the risk of an abnormal heart rhythm, a new study finds. Azithromycin (Zithromax) is often used to treat respiratory and urinary tract infections. It belongs to a class of drugs known as macrolides. Another type of macrolide called erythromycin can disrupt the heart's normal rhythm. That antibiotic has been linked to a potentially life-threatening heart condition called ventricular arrhythmia. Recent studies have reached conflicting conclusions about whether azithromycin is also linked to an increased risk of death from that condition. In an effort to clarify the issue, researchers analyzed data from more than 14 million new antibiotic users. The patients were located in Denmark, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom. The study found that 0.1 percent developed ventricular arrhythmia. ... Read more

Related support groups: Amoxicillin, Azithromycin, Arrhythmia, Augmentin, Zithromax, Erythromycin, Amoxicillin/Clavulanate, Amoxil, Prevpac, Zithromax Z-Pak, MY-E, Z-Pak, Ventricular Arrhythmia, Azasite, Erythrocin, Amoxil Pediatric Drops, Ery-Tab, Amoxicillin/Clarithromycin/Lansoprazole, Azithromycin Dose Pack, A/T/S

Taller, Bigger Women May Face Irregular Heartbeat Risk

Posted 18 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, April 10, 2017 – Big or tall women are nearly three times as likely to develop the dangerous irregular heart rhythm known as atrial fibrillation as smaller women, a preliminary study says. The larger a woman's body size as a young adult, the more likely she is to develop the heart disorder later in life, according to the researchers. "There was a stepwise elevation in risk with increasing body size," said study author Dr. Annika Rosengren. "The group with the highest body surface area had nearly three times the risk as those with the lowest body surface area," added Rosengren, a professor of internal medicine at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden. Atrial fibrillation is an irregular heartbeat that develops in the atria – the two upper chambers of the heart. The quivering heartbeat increases risk of stroke, heart failure and other heart rhythm problems, according to the ... Read more

Related support groups: Atrial Fibrillation, Heart Disease, Arrhythmia, Cardiac Arrhythmia, Abnormal Electrocardiogram

Heart Devices 101: Guide to the Tools That Keep You Ticking

Posted 3 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, April 2, 2017 – Pacemakers, defibrillators and other medical devices have saved the lives of millions of people worldwide. Someone you know probably has received one of these heart-health enhancers, although not all have become household words. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration evaluates and regulates these and other medical devices in the United States. Below, the agency provides a brief glossary of terms that might come in handy when a doctor recommends a cardiac tool: Heart pacemakers: These small, battery-powered devices are implanted in the body. They deliver an electric shock to restore normal heart rhythm when the heart beats too slowly. Implantable cardioverter defibrillators: These deliver a shock to restore normal heart rhythm when the heart beats too fast. Automated external defibrillators: These portable, automatic devices are found in many public locations. ... Read more

Related support groups: Atrial Fibrillation, Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Arrhythmia, Heart Failure, Congestive Heart Failure, Tachyarrhythmia, Angina, Supraventricular Tachycardia, Prosthetic Heart Valves, Prevention of Thromboembolism in Atrial Fibrillation, Mitral Valve Prolapse, Myocardial Infarction, Cardiac Arrhythmia, Ventricular Tachycardia, Prosthetic Heart Valves - Mechanical Valves, Left Ventricular Dysfunction, Mitral Insufficiency, Atrial Flutter, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD)

Just 17 U.S. States Require Defibrillators in Some Schools

Posted 27 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, March 27, 2017 – Automated external defibrillators in schools save lives, but only about one-third of U.S. states require the devices in at least some schools, a new study reveals. As of February 2016, researchers found that 33 states had no legislation requiring automatic external defibrillators (AEDs) in schools. The portable devices treat sudden cardiac arrest – the abrupt, unexpected loss of heart function. They deliver a shock meant to restore normal heart rhythm. Defibrillators are easy to use by bystanders, but time is crucial. The chances of survival decrease 10 percent for every minute a shock is not applied, research has shown. "This review should be used to inform the debate about expanding community-access AEDs into schools," said study lead author Dr. Mark Sherrid. Of the 17 states with AED requirements, only one requires them in public and private grade schools ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Attack, Arrhythmia, Myocardial Infarction, Cardiac Arrest, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders, Cardiogenic Shock

Exercise a Great Prescription to Help Older Hearts

Posted 24 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 23, 2017 – Regular exercise is potent medicine for older adults with heart disease, a new American Heart Association scientific statement says. Physical activity should be a key part of care for older adults with heart disease who want to reduce their symptoms and build their stamina, said geriatric cardiologist Dr. Daniel Forman. He's chair of the panel that wrote the new statement. "Many health-care providers are focused only on the medical management of diseases – such as heart failure, heart attacks, valvular heart disease and strokes – without directly focusing on helping patients maximize their physical function," Forman said in a heart association news release. Yet, after a heart attack or other cardiac event, patients need to gain strength. Their independence may require the ability "to lift a grocery bag and to carry it to their car," said Forman, a professor ... Read more

Related support groups: Atrial Fibrillation, Heart Disease, Ischemic Stroke, Heart Attack, Arrhythmia, Heart Failure, Congestive Heart Failure, Transient Ischemic Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Left Ventricular Dysfunction, Ischemic Heart Disease

Fish Oil Pills May Help After Heart Attack, Specialists Say

Posted 13 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, March 13, 2017 – Doctors may want to consider prescribing fish oil pills to heart attack survivors and patients with chronic heart failure, new recommendations from the American Heart Association suggest. Fish oil may help extend the lives of those patients, the heart association said. On the other hand, the supplements cannot be recommended for preventing heart problems in the first place, said Dr. David Siscovick, lead author of the report. That's because no clinical trials have tested fish oil's effects in people who are free of heart disease. Meanwhile, a few trials have given fish oil to people at increased risk of heart disease – because of diabetes or high cholesterol, for example. All but one has come up empty. "Many people take fish oil hoping to prevent heart disease," Siscovick acknowledged. "But there's a lack of evidence that it does." Fish oil is rich in omega-3 ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Heart Disease, Ischemic Stroke, High Cholesterol, Arrhythmia, Fish Oil, Lovaza, Transient Ischemic Attack, Diabetes Mellitus, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Omega-3, Omacor, Ischemic Heart Disease, Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids, MaxEPA, Marine Lipid Concentrate, Post MI Syndrome, EPA Fish Oil, Omega 3-6-9 Complex, Restora

Shocks From Implanted Defibrillators Trigger Health Costs of Their Own

Posted 15 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 15, 2017 – While implanted defibrillators can deliver a potentially lifesaving shock to a heart that's beating erratically, patients often wind up in the emergency room or the hospital needing medical procedures afterwards, a new study shows. That was the case whether the shock was needed or not, and in 38 percent of cases it wasn't, the researchers added. "I see two implications," said study co-author Dr. Matthew Reynolds. "First, we need to do all we can to minimize these shock events, which are known to negatively affect patients' quality of life, are undesirable clinically and, in our study, trigger costly medical interventions." These procedures include invasive measures to test the heart's function, according to the study. "Second, there is no standard approach to managing these events . . . so we need to develop a better understanding of which interventions are ... Read more

Related support groups: Atrial Fibrillation, Heart Disease, Arrhythmia, Cardiac Arrhythmia, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ventricular Arrhythmia, Ischemic Heart Disease

Hospitalizations for Common Heart Rhythm Problem on the Rise

Posted 6 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 6, 2017 – U.S. patients with a common heart rhythm disorder called atrial fibrillation (AFib) are ending up in the hospital more often than before, a new study says. The good news is that they're surviving more, too. "The more intensive and costly inpatient care that we're providing for AFib recently is associated with decreasing rates of readmission and both short- and longer-term death rates," study first author Dr. James Freeman said in a Yale University news release. He is an assistant professor of medicine (cardiology) at the school. Freeman noted that use of several newer treatments increased during the study period, including catheter ablation and medications. The use of ablation, which involves burning or freezing specific areas of the heart, rose along with improvements in hospitalizations and death rates. Atrial fibrillation – marked by electrical irregularities ... Read more

Related support groups: Atrial Fibrillation, Heart Disease, Arrhythmia, Prevention of Thromboembolism in Atrial Fibrillation, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders, Cardiothoracic Surgery

'Ablation' Procedure Helps 3 out of 4 Patients With Irregular Heartbeat

Posted 25 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25, 2017 – Just how successful is the procedure called catheter ablation at fixing irregular heartbeats that can be potentially fatal? Pretty successful, a new study found, but there are caveats. Burning or freezing specific areas of the heart can alleviate the common irregular heart beat called atrial fibrillation in 74 percent of patients. However, the procedure doesn't work for everyone and there are risks of complications, researchers report. Atrial fibrillation increases the risk of early death by two times in women and 1.5 times in men. It causes 20 to 30 percent of all strokes and can decrease quality of life due to palpitations, shortness of breath, tiredness, weakness and psychological distress, the study authors explained. About 2.7 million Americans suffer from atrial fibrillation, according to the American Heart Association. For those whose atrial ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Warfarin, Coumadin, Atrial Fibrillation, Arrhythmia, Pradaxa, Prevention of Thromboembolism in Atrial Fibrillation, Cardiac Arrhythmia, Jantoven, Dabigatran, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Atrial Tachycardia, Argatroban, Refludan, Desirudin, Angiomax, Lepirudin, Iprivask, Anisindione, Miradon

Could a Therapy for Irregular Heartbeat Harm the Brain?

Posted 24 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 24, 2017 – Catheter ablation is a common treatment for a form of irregular heartbeat known as premature ventricular contractions. Now, a small new study suggests the approach may put some patients at risk for brain injury. The findings are preliminary, but are "relevant to a large number of patients undergoing this procedure," study senior author Dr. Gregory Marcus said in a news release from the University of California, San Francisco. The study suggests that the procedure may help encourage the formation of brain lesions. Marcus, who directs clinical research at UCSF's department of cardiology, said he hopes the research "will inspire many studies to understand the meaning of and how to mitigate these lesions." The study included 18 patients who underwent catheter ablation for premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) – a type of abnormal heartbeat originating in a ... Read more

Related support groups: Bleeding Disorder, Arrhythmia, Diagnosis and Investigation, Brain Anomalies incl Congenital, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Premature Ventricular Depolarizations, Head Imaging

Implanted Defibrillators Benefit Seniors: Study

Posted 18 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 18, 2017 – Seniors who receive an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) have high survival rates, a new study finds. An ICD – which is placed under the skin and connected to the heart with wires – detects an irregular heartbeat and delivers an electrical shock to restore normal rhythm. In the study, researchers analyzed data from more than 12,400 Medicare patients, aged 65 and older, who received an ICD after sudden cardiac arrest or a nearly fatal fast heart rhythm. Nearly 80 percent of the patients survived two years after receiving the implanted device, according to the study published Jan. 16 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. More than 65 percent of the patients were hospitalized during the two years after receiving an ICD. Rates ranged from 60.5 percent among those younger than age 70 to 71.5 percent among those 80 and older. About 13 ... Read more

Related support groups: Atrial Fibrillation, Arrhythmia, Tachyarrhythmia, Cardiac Arrhythmia, Ventricular Tachycardia, Atrial Flutter, Ventricular Arrhythmia

Pregnancy OK for Most Women With Congenital Heart Conditions: Report

Posted 12 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 12, 2017 – Women with serious congenital heart defects can usually have successful pregnancies – but they should work closely with their doctors before, during and after pregnancy, according to new recommendations from the American Heart Association (AHA). At one time, women born with complex heart conditions were told they could never have a baby, said Dr. Jamil Aboulhosn, a cardiologist and one of the authors of the AHA scientific statement. But that old thinking has evolved, said Aboulhosn, who is based at University of California, Los Angeles Medical Center. Studies in recent years have shown that when those women work with an experienced team of health care providers, they generally can have healthy pregnancies, the statement said. The key is planning, said Mary Canobbio, a registered nurse who led the committee that crafted the new recommendations. "Prepregnancy ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Emergency Contraception, Arrhythmia, Postcoital Contraception, Pulmonary Hypertension, Delivery, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Hydrocephalus, Aortic Stenosis, Brain Anomalies incl Congenital, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

On Hospital Wards, Patient Crises May Have 'Domino Effect'

Posted 27 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 27, 2016 – Hospitalized patients have a higher risk of cardiac arrest and transfers to intensive care if they're in wards when other patients have recently suffered similar emergencies, a new study suggests. "This should serve as a wake-up call for hospital-based physicians," study author Dr. Matthew Churpek, an assistant professor of medicine at the University of Chicago, said in a university news release. "After caring for a patient who becomes critically ill on the hospital wards, we should routinely check to see how the other patients on the unit are doing," he said. "Following these high-intensity events, our to-do list should include a thorough assessment of the other patients on the unit, to make sure none of them are at risk of slipping through the cracks," he added. Churpek's team tracked outcomes for adult patients who were admitted to the University of Chicago ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Arrhythmia, Myocardial Infarction, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis

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