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Apnea of Prematurity News

Premature Calcium Deposits May Trigger Premature Births: Study

Posted 9 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 9, 2016 – A new potential risk factor for premature birth has been identified. Ten percent of infants are born prematurely (before 37 weeks of pregnancy), and many suffer long-term health problems. Knowing why preterm births occur might help prevent them, researchers said. A team at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, found that calcium deposits in the membrane surrounding the fetus can form early and may cause a mother's water to break too soon. The deposits, early markers of bone, make the membrane less elastic. The same kind of deposits have also been implicated in kidney stones and hardening of the arteries. But the new study did not prove that these early calcium deposits cause premature birth. "We do see calcium deposits in full term births as well, which is probably part of the normal breakdown of the membranes at the appropriate time," study senior ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Labor Pain, Apnea of Prematurity, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Calcium Oxalate Calculi with Hyperuricosuria, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Health Tip: Safer Sleep for Baby

Posted 8 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Exactly what do worried parents need to do to keep baby safer while the infant is asleep? The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends: Always put baby to sleep on the back, until baby turns a year old. If baby rolls over, you don't need to keep flipping the infant back. Just keep the crib clear of any objects, including pillows, bumper pads, toys and blankets. If baby falls asleep in a swing, or car seat, transfer baby to the crib as soon as possible. Make sure baby's crib mattress is firm. Don't let baby sleep in your bed. But for at least the first six months, put baby's crib in your bedroom. Never let baby sleep on a couch or chair. If you swaddle baby, make sure it's not too tight. Stop swaddling when baby tries to roll over. Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Delivery, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Labor Pain, Apnea of Prematurity, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Infants Should Share Parents' Room to Help Prevent SIDS

Posted 24 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 24, 2016 – Infants should sleep in the same room as their parents – but not in the same bed – to reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), new guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics advise. The recommendations call for babies to share their parents' bedroom for at least the first 6 months of life and, ideally, for the first year. This could reduce the risk of sudden death by as much as 50 percent, the guideline authors say. "Room sharing makes a lot of sense," said Dr. Paul Jarris, deputy medical officer at the March of Dimes. The rationale is that having the infant within view and reach makes for easier monitoring, comforting and feeding. Because the baby is nearby, parents might notice any potential difficulty, Jarris said. "If we look at how strong the evidence is, parents will be well advised to adopt room sharing," Jarris said. It's ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Premature Labor, Apnea of Prematurity, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Even Incomplete Steroid Treatment Helps Preemies: Study

Posted 10 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 – Even partial steroid treatment before birth can improve survival odds for extremely premature infants and reduce their risk of certain birth defects, a new study suggests. Steroids are standard therapy for pregnant women likely to give birth before 34 weeks of gestation. But the complete course of treatment takes at least 48 hours and doctors may decide not to begin treatment if premature delivery is imminent, explained researchers funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health. But these new findings "suggest that starting steroid treatment promptly – even if the likelihood of completion is low – is beneficial when extremely premature birth is imminent," the researchers said. The investigators analyzed data from more than 6,100 extremely premature infants who were born between 22 and 27 weeks of pregnancy. They were followed for 18 to 22 months after birth. ... Read more

Related support groups: Betamethasone, Delivery, Premature Labor, Celestone, Betamethasone/Clotrimazole, Lotrisone, Taclonex, Beta-Val, Betnovate, Luxiq, Diprosone, Apnea of Prematurity, Cesarean Section, Diprolene, Enstilar, Betaderm, Taclonex Scalp, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Celestone Phosphate, Valisone

3 Steps to Lower a Woman's Risk of Premature Birth

Posted 31 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 30, 2016 – Up to one-quarter of preterm births might be prevented if women paid attention to three risk factors that are under their control, new research suggests. Those factors include spacing pregnancies well, beginning at a healthy weight and gaining the recommended amount during the pregnancy, the researchers found. "These are all risk factors for a really serious health outcome – preterm birth," said study co-author Dr. Emily DeFranco. She is a researcher at the Center for Prevention of Preterm Birth at Cincinnati Children's Hospital. Babies born before 37 weeks' gestation are considered preterm. Being born early puts babies at risk for breathing, heart, gastrointestinal and developmental problems, among other issues. In the United States, the overall rate of preterm birth is 11.4 percent – more than twice as high as that in several other developed countries, the ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Labor Pain, Apnea of Prematurity, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Babies Often Put to Sleep in Unsafe Positions

Posted 15 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 15, 2016 – Despite decades of warnings from the "Back to Sleep" campaign, many parents are still putting their babies to sleep in ways that raise the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), a new study finds. Each year in the United States, about 3,500 infants die suddenly, from no obvious cause, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A majority of those deaths are labeled as SIDS – a phenomenon that researchers still don't completely understand. One thing that's clear is that an infant's sleeping environment is key. Since the 1990s, doctors and public health experts have encouraged parents to put infants to sleep on their backs, keep soft bedding out of the crib, and take other "safe sleep" measures. The new study, published Aug. 15 in Pediatrics, suggests that the message is not getting through. "What we found was disturbing," said senior ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Apnea of Prematurity, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Success of 'Cervical Stitch' May Depend on the Thread: Study

Posted 3 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 3, 2016 – The type of thread used in a procedure to prevent preterm labor may influence odds for stillbirth and preterm birth, researchers report. The procedure, called a cervical stitch, is performed on roughly 2 million women a year worldwide who are considered at high risk of miscarriage or premature birth. To delay labor, doctors place a stitch in the cervix to keep it closed. But researchers found the most commonly used suture – a braided thread – was associated with tripled odds of stillbirth compared to a single-strand suture. And risk of preterm birth was nearly doubled. "We don't have very good tools for determining who would and who would not benefit from that operation, and probably put cervical stitches in many women who don't really need them, so it's important that we first do no harm," said researcher Dr. Phillip Bennett, a professor of obstetrics and ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Premature Labor, Labor Pain, Cervical Ripening, Apnea of Prematurity, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Breast-Fed Preemies Do Better on Skills Tests: Study

Posted 3 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 2, 2016 – Breast milk gives a boost to premature babies' mental and physical development, a new study finds. "Our data support current recommendations for using mother's milk to feed preterm babies during their neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) hospitalization," said study author Dr. Mandy Brown Belfort. She is a researcher and pediatrician from Brigham and Women's Hospital. The study included 180 babies who were born before 30 weeks gestation and followed until age 7. Babies who were mostly fed breast milk during the first 28 days of life did better in IQ, math, working memory and tests of motor skills at age 7 than those who received less breast milk. Belfort said hospitals, employers, friends and relatives need to support new mothers during this time when they are under stress and producing milk for their newborns. "Many mothers of preterm babies have difficulty ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Premature Labor, Labor Pain, Apnea of Prematurity, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Pregnancy Problems More Likely With Baby Boys, Study Suggests

Posted 29 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 29, 2016 – Serious pregnancy complications are more likely when women are carrying baby boys, new research suggests. After analyzing more than half a million births in Australia, researchers said the baby's gender could be linked to the health of both mother and child. "The sex of the baby has a direct association with pregnancy complications," said study first author Dr. Petra Verburg, of the Robinson Research Institute at the University of Adelaide in Australia. Boy babies were more likely to be born early, which sets up infants for more health problems. Also, women carrying boys were slightly more likely to have diabetes during pregnancy (gestational diabetes), and pre-eclampsia, a serious high blood pressure condition, when ready to deliver, the study authors said. Although it isn't totally clear why this is so, "there are likely to be genetic factors," Verburg said. ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Delivery, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Postpartum Bleeding, Labor Pain, Gestational Diabetes, Cervical Ripening, Apnea of Prematurity, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Hyperemesis Gravidarum with Metabolic Disturbance, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

If 1st Baby's Early, 2nd Will Be Too: Study

Posted 13 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 12, 2016 – Women who give birth to their first child even a couple of weeks early are up to three times more likely to deliver their next baby prematurely, new research suggests. "The magnitude of the increased risk surprised us – it really is a potent factor," said senior study author Laura Jelliffe-Pawlowski. She is associate director of precision health with the University of California, San Francisco's Preterm Birth Initiative. For the study, researchers analyzed data from more than 160,000 women who gave birth in California between 2005 and 2011. The study authors defined "preterm" as birth at less than 37 weeks' gestation and "early term" birth at 37 to 38 weeks' gestation. Preterm birth is the leading cause of infant death and a major cause of life-long neurological issues, such as cerebral palsy, developmental delays, and vision and hearing loss, according to the ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Emergency Contraception, Postcoital Contraception, Delivery, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Postpartum Bleeding, Labor Pain, Cervical Ripening, Apnea of Prematurity, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Hyperemesis Gravidarum with Metabolic Disturbance, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Breast-Feeding a Boon to Preemies' Hearts: Study

Posted 14 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, June 14, 2016 – Breast-feeding premature babies appears to increase the likelihood that those infants will have healthier hearts in young adulthood, new research suggests. The finding was based on an analysis involving just over 200 men and women in their early- to mid-20s. It suggests that premature infants fed just breast milk during infancy ultimately have better heart volume and overall function compared to preemies raised on formula or a mixture of formula and breast milk. "It was completely unknown that breast milk would provide this particular protective effect on the development of the heart in babies born preterm," said study author Paul Leeson. He's the clinical director of the Cardiovascular Medicine Division of the Cardiovascular Clinical Research Facility at the University of Oxford, in England. "We suspected it might, but were surprised by the size of the ... Read more

Related support groups: Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Premature Labor, Apnea of Prematurity, Lactation Augmentation, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Anemia Associated with Prematurity

Health Tip: Swaddle Baby Safely

Posted 25 May 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Swaddling baby snugly in a blanket can help provide a feeling of security, but parents should make sure they're swaddling properly. The American Academy of Pediatrics advises: Making sure baby's hips aren't swaddled too tight, which can lead to hip problems. Baby's legs should be able to bend both out and up. Start swaddling with the blanket spread flat, folding down one corner. Place baby on the back in the middle of the blanket, placing the head above the folded corner. With baby's left arm straight, take the left corner of the blanket and wrap it across baby's body, tucking it around the body beneath the right arm. Then place baby's right arm against the body, and wrap the right side of the blanket across the body, tucking underneath the left side of the body. Loosely fold the end of the blanket beneath baby's body. Make sure you can fit at least two fingers between the baby's ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Delivery, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Apnea of Prematurity, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

What Really Works to Help Baby Sleep

Posted 24 May 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 24, 2016 – Common techniques for helping babies – and parents – sleep at night seem to carry no long-term harms, a small trial finds. The study tested two methods: "graduated extinction" (also known as "controlled crying") and "bedtime fading." The former strategy is aimed at letting babies "self-soothe" on their own, without immediate parental intervention. The latter method extends a baby's bedtime, to help sleep come more quickly. Researchers found that both approaches encouraged babies to fall asleep faster at bedtime. The controlled-crying approach also helped them wake up fewer times during the night. What's more, neither technique seemed to harm babies' emotional development or bonding with mom and dad, the researchers found. It's that latter finding that's most important, according to Dr. Marcel Deray, a pediatric sleep specialist at Nicklaus Children's Hospital, ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Fatigue, Delivery, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Premature Labor, Apnea of Prematurity, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Extreme 'Preemies' Often Have Lifelong Challenges

Posted 23 May 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 23, 2016 – Extremely premature infants often face lifelong challenges, enduring more physical, emotional and social difficulties as adults than their peers born full-term, researchers report. In general, however, these tiny babies grow up to contribute to society and live independently, a study of nearly 200 adults in Canada has found. Still, researchers found those born very prematurely were more likely to be unemployed, earn less and have chronic health problems compared to those born full-term. A higher proportion were single, said they'd never had sex, and tended to engage in fewer risky behaviors. "Most of these differences were accounted for because they had neurological impairments like cerebral palsy and blindness," said lead researcher Dr. Saroj Saigal, a professor of pediatrics at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario. If you exclude the 20 percent with ... Read more

Related support groups: Cerebral Palsy, Premature Labor, Apnea of Prematurity, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Visual Defect/Disturbance

Pain, Epilepsy Drug Lyrica May Increase Birth Defects Risk, Study Suggests

Posted 18 May 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 18, 2016 – The widely prescribed drug pregabalin (Lyrica) may slightly increase the risk for birth defects, a new study suggests. In a small study, researchers found that among women taking Lyrica during the first trimester of pregnancy, 6 percent had infants with major birth defects. In women who weren't taking the drug, 2 percent had a baby with a major birth defect, the study found. "These results should be taken with caution," said study senior author Dr. Thierry Buclin, from the Swiss Teratogen Information Service and the division of clinical pharmacology at the Lausanne University Hospital, in Switzerland. "It's a warning, but it cannot be taken as a certainty." Lyrica is prescribed for a range of health problems, including epilepsy, fibromyalgia and anxiety. The new study findings should be investigated further, Buclin said. "We should not unduly alarm ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Contraception, Anxiety and Stress, Fibromyalgia, Seizures, Lyrica, Social Anxiety Disorder, Epilepsy, Pregabalin, Delivery, Performance Anxiety, Premature Labor, Hydrocephalus, Labor Pain, Apnea of Prematurity, Brain Anomalies incl Congenital, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

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