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Related terms: Aortic Valve Stenosis

Study: Tissue Heart Valves Seem Best for Middle-Aged Patients

Posted 13 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 13, 2016 – Middle-aged heart valve replacement patients may have better outcomes if they receive valves made from animal tissue rather than metal, researchers report. The investigators analyzed 13 studies that compared metal and tissue valves in patients aged 40 to 70 who had aortic valve replacement. Heart valves are designed to allow blood to flow in only one direction through the heart. The two types of valves studied have different risks and benefits, the authors of the report explained. Metal (mechanical) valves last longer but are more likely to cause blood clots. So patients have to take blood-thinning drugs for the rest of their lives, which can increase the risk of major bleeding, the study authors said. Tissue (bioprosthetic) valves are less likely to cause blood clots, but they may need to be replaced at some point, the authors added. Fifteen years after ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Prosthetic Heart Valves, Mitral Valve Prolapse, Prosthetic Heart Valves - Mechanical Valves, Mitral Insufficiency, Aortic Stenosis, Prosthetic Heart Valves - Tissue Valves, Mitral Stenosis, Valvular Heart Disease, Aortic Insufficiency

Heart Valve Patients Who Manage Their Own Blood Thinners May Do Better

Posted 10 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 10, 2015 – Patients with mechanical heart valves may benefit from managing their own blood thinners, a new study suggests. "There are several reasons that patients who self-manage treatment have better outcomes than those who follow standard management," said study leader Dr. Thomas Decker Christensen, from Aarhus University Hospital, in Denmark. "Self-management patients receive more detailed information about oral anticoagulation therapy; they also learn more about the influence that diet, infectious diseases, alcohol, and other drug interactions can have on their treatment than do patients receiving standard management," Christensen explained. "We believe that the majority of patients who have a mechanical heart valve inserted during surgery should be able to manage their oral anticoagulant therapy, and recommend this as the standard treatment approach for these ... Read more

Related support groups: Prosthetic Heart Valves - Mechanical Valves, Mitral Insufficiency, Aortic Stenosis, Aortic Insufficiency, Valvular Heart Disease

Heart Doctors May Have Hard Time Spotting Valve Problems

Posted 1 Sep 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 1, 2015 – Heart specialists can't always identify heart valve problems through the sound of heart murmurs, but additional training improves their abilities, a new study shows. A heart murmur is an extra or unusual sound that occurs during a heartbeat, according to the U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI). Some murmurs don't indicate a problem, but others can signal heart valve problems, the NHLBI says. The study included nearly 1,100 cardiologists who had their skills assessed at American College of Cardiology meetings from 2011 to 2014. They were asked to diagnose heart valve problems after listening to recordings of heart murmurs. The doctors failed to identify half of basic problems and one-third of advanced problems, the study found. The cardiologists then did extra training for both basic and advanced heart valve problems (90 minutes each). They ... Read more

Related support groups: Prosthetic Heart Valves, Mitral Valve Prolapse, Prosthetic Heart Valves - Mechanical Valves, Mitral Insufficiency, Aortic Stenosis, Prosthetic Heart Valves - Tissue Valves, Mitral Stenosis, Aortic Insufficiency, Valvular Heart Disease

Improved Artificial Heart Valve Approved

Posted 17 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 17, 2015 – The newest version of the Sapien 3 Transcatheter Heart Valve has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The artificial valve is designed for people with a narrowed aortic valve, a condition that restricts blood flow from the heart to the aorta, the body's main artery. The product is sanctioned for people who are at high risk for death or serious complications from open-heart surgery to repair the narrowed valve, the FDA said in a news release. The newly approved device is the third-generation Sapien 3, originally approved in 2011. The newest version includes changes designed to minimize leakage, the FDA said. In people with aortic stenosis, the heart must work harder to pump blood through the narrowed opening. Symptoms can include fainting, chest pain, heart failure, irregular heartbeat and cardiac arrest. Possible side effects of the device ... Read more

Related support groups: Prosthetic Heart Valves, Mitral Valve Prolapse, Prosthetic Heart Valves - Mechanical Valves, Mitral Insufficiency, Aortic Stenosis, Prosthetic Heart Valves - Tissue Valves, Aortic Insufficiency, Valvular Heart Disease, Cardiothoracic Surgery

Stents Meant to Prevent Stroke May Actually Boost Risk

Posted 24 Mar 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 24, 2015 – Using stents rather than medication alone to keep narrowed arteries open in the brain may actually increase patients' risk of stroke, according to the results of a new trial. The study involved more than 100 patients at risk of stroke because of what's called intracranial arterial stenosis – plaque build-up in the artery walls in the brain. Those who received balloon-expandable stents – tiny, mesh tubes like those used to open heart arteries – were more than twice as likely to suffer a stroke or ministroke as patients treated with two blood thinners, Plavix and aspirin. Moreover, in the month after the procedure, 8.6 percent of the stent patients suffered from bleeding in the brain and about 5 percent died, versus none of those who were treated with drugs. "The current technology with balloon-mounted stent is very limited and is not recommended for patients ... Read more

Related support groups: Aspirin, Plavix, Excedrin, Clopidogrel, Aggrenox, Alka-Seltzer, Fiorinal, Excedrin Migraine, Ecotrin, Fiorinal with Codeine, Arthritis Pain Formula, Bayer Aspirin, Norgesic, Soma Compound, Aortic Stenosis, Excedrin Extra Strength, Neurosurgery, Norgesic Forte, Percodan, Levacet

Outcomes Vary With Minimally Invasive Heart Valve Replacement

Posted 10 Mar 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 10, 2015 – Nearly one-quarter of heart disease patients who underwent so-called transcatheter aortic valve replacement surgery died within a year, while roughly 4 percent had a stroke, new research reveals. But some patients did well, the study found. Almost half who survived past one year weren't re-hospitalized in that time, while less than one-quarter were readmitted once. The findings provide insight into the potential upsides and downsides of a relatively new but increasingly popular procedure designed to restore blood flow and relieve heart strain for patients with severe aortic stenosis. This means their main heart valve no longer fully opens. "In the past, the standard of care had been conventional surgery and total replacement of the aortic valve," explained study lead author Dr. David Holmes, Jr., a cardiologist with the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. "But ... Read more

Related support groups: Aortic Stenosis

Study Ties Gene to Dangerous Heart Valve Deposits

Posted 6 Feb 2013 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 6 – Researchers have identified a gene variant that doubles the risk of having calcium deposits on the heart's aortic valve. Severe aortic valve calcification can cause narrowing or blockage of the aortic valve, a condition called aortic stenosis, which can prevent the proper amount of blood from reaching the brain and the rest of the body. Researchers analyzed genetic data from thousands of people and found that a genetic variant of the LPA gene was strongly associated with having aortic valve calcification on a CT scan and increased the risk of developing aortic stenosis by more than 50 percent. The LPA gene codes for a type of cholesterol particle called lipoprotein (a), which circulates in the blood and is associated with increased risk of heart attack. Previous studies have linked lipoprotein (a) with aortic valve disease, but this study is believed to be the first ... Read more

Related support groups: Aortic Stenosis

Less Invasive Heart Valve Replacement Works for Elderly: Study

Posted 2 May 2012 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 2 – For elderly patients with a heart valve disease known as aortic stenosis, a procedure called a transcatheter aortic-valve implantation appears safe and effective, French researchers say. Transcatheter aortic-valve implantation is a less invasive way of replacing the heart's aortic valve than traditional open-heart surgery. The procedure involves passing a replacement valve through a leg or shoulder artery and advancing it until it reaches the aortic valve, taking its place. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the technique in 2011. "Surgical aortic valve replacement is the definitive therapy for severe symptomatic aortic stenosis," said study co-author Dr. Martine Gilard, of the department of cardiology at Brest University Hospital in France. And transcatheter aortic-valve implantation "is a new therapeutic option for these patients," he said. The U.S. ... Read more

Related support groups: Prosthetic Heart Valves, Aortic Stenosis, Valvular Heart Disease

FDA OKs Heart Valve That Does Not Require Open-Heart Surgery

Posted 3 Nov 2011 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 3 – The first artificial heart valve that can be implanted without open-heart surgery has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The Sapien Transcatheter Heart Valve is designed to replace an aortic heart valve damaged by senile aortic valve stenosis, a progressive and age-related illness caused by calcium deposits that cause the valve to narrow. One expert called the advent of the device "a revolutionary breakthrough" in terms of expanding access for sick or frail patients. "This new approach to valve replacement is designed for the elderly and the highest risk patients who are inoperable – or nearly inoperable – by conventional criteria," said Dr. Gregory Crooke, assistant director of cardiothoracic surgery at Maimonides Medical Center in New York City, which is already offering the device to select patients. "As has been shown in trials, it should ... Read more

Related support groups: Aortic Stenosis, Valvular Heart Disease

Artificial Heart Valve Doesn't Require Open-Heart Surgery

Posted 3 Nov 2011 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 3 – The first artificial heart valve that can replace a diseased aortic valve without requiring open-heart surgery has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. A patient's aortic valve can be damaged by stenosis, a narrowing of the valve caused by the buildup of calcium deposits. The heart must then work harder to pump blood through the diseased valve, which could lead to symptoms including fainting, chest pain, heart failure, irregular heartbeat or cardiac arrest. More than half of the people with these symptoms die within two years, the FDA said in a news release. Traditionally, replacement of this valve has required open-heart surgery. But the newly approved Sapien Transcatheter Heart Valve (THV) allows doctors to implant it using a tube-shaped device called a delivery catheter, via a small incision in the leg. The catheter is slightly wider than a ... Read more

Related support groups: Aortic Stenosis, Valvular Heart Disease

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