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Related terms: Anxiety States, Anxious

Study of Teen Brains Offers Clues to Timing of Mental Illness

Posted 10 minutes ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 27, 2016 – Changes that occur in teens' brains as they mature may help explain why the first signs of mental illness tend to appear during this time, researchers report. British researchers used MRI scans to compare the brain structures of nearly 300 participants who were aged 14 to 24. The scientists discovered that the brain's outer region (cortex) becomes thinner as teens get older. At the same time, they saw that levels of myelin increased within the cortex. That increase was seen in critical regions of the brain that act as connection points between other regions. Myelin is the sheath that covers nerve fibers and enables them to communicate efficiently. "During our teenage years, our brains continue to develop. When we're still children, these changes may be more dramatic, but in adolescence we see that the changes refine the detail," explained study first author ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Bipolar Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Schizophrenia, Severe Mood Dysregulation, Diagnosis and Investigation, Dependent Personality Disorder, Head Imaging

Can Trauma Trigger Violent Crime in Mentally Ill?

Posted 14 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 13, 2016 – People with serious mental illness who are victims of violence or exposed to stressful events are more likely to engage in a violent crime in the week following the trauma, a new study contends. Stressful experiences also affect people without psychiatric disorders, but not to the same extent, the researchers said. Some stressful events – such as being violently victimized, injured in an accident, losing one's parents or self-harming – act as "triggers," said study co-author Dr. Seena Fazel. He is a professor of forensic psychiatry at the University of Oxford in England. Experiencing one of these events increases the risk of committing a violent criminal act within a week of the trigger, especially in people with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, Fazel said. People diagnosed with these conditions have higher rates of criminal convictions than the general ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Schizophrenia, Paranoid Disorder, Schizoaffective Disorder, Agitation, Psychosis, Agitated State, Psychiatric Disorders, Drug Psychosis, Executive Function Disorder

Health Tip: Manage Emotional Stress

Posted 14 days ago by Drugs.com

-- Life's many changes can be stressful, which may harm your health. The American Academy of Family Physicians advises: Learn to recognize the first signs of stress, such as neck stiffness or clenching a fist. Learn to let go of things you can't control. For stressful situations such as a job interview, prepare as much as you can. Change your outlook. View changes as a challenge, rather than a threat. If there are conflicts at work, try to resolve them. Don't overschedule yourself. Find a friend, loved one or other trusted source to talk with when you feel stressed. Engage in an activity that helps you feel relaxed, such as a hobby or sport. Get regular exercise, nutritious meals and plenty of sleep. Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Social Anxiety Disorder

Heat Waves Are Health Threats

Posted 3 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, July 2, 2016 – Heat waves are more than uncomfortable, they can be deadly. That's especially true in large cities. And, seniors, children and people with chronic health problems are at higher risk for heat-related illness and death, according to Dr. Robert Glatter. He's an emergency physician at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. "Those who have high blood pressure, heart disease, diabetes, kidney disease, as well as those who suffer with mental illness, may be at risk for heat-related emergencies, including heat cramps, heat syncope (fainting), heat exhaustion, as well as heat stroke," he said in a hospital news release. "Various classes of medications including beta blockers, as well as diuretics, can impair sweating – ultimately disrupting the body's ability to cool itself. Other medications including antihistamines, as well as antidepressants and sedatives, may also ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Type 2, Lexapro, Zoloft, Cymbalta, Effexor, Prozac, Celexa, Hypertension, Citalopram, Paxil, Metoprolol, Major Depressive Disorder, Sertraline, Pristiq, Social Anxiety Disorder, Amitriptyline, Fluoxetine

Hovering Parents May Harm Kids

Posted 27 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, June 25, 2016 – Children with "intrusive" parents who push too hard for good grades may be more prone to become highly self-critical or anxious and depressed, a new study suggests. "When parents become intrusive in their children's lives, it may signal to the children that what they do is never good enough," said study leader Ryan Hong, an assistant professor in the department of psychology at the National University of Singapore. The five-year study of primary school students in Singapore found that those whose parents acted intrusively, had high expectations of academic performance or overreacted when the child made a mistake were at increased risk of being overly critical of themselves. The researchers also found that children who were highly self-critical had higher levels of anxiety or depression symptoms, although the study did not prove that parental pressure caused ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Major Depressive Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Dysthymia, Seasonal Affective Disorder

'Love Hormone' Gene May Be Key to Social Life

Posted 21 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, June 21, 2016 – Lower activity of a specific gene may affect a person's social behavior, including the ability to form healthy relationships, researchers say. The OXT gene is involved in the production of oxytocin, a hormone linked with a large number of social behaviors in people. It's sometimes referred to as the "love hormone." The University of Georgia team assessed more than 120 people, conducting genetic tests and assessments of social skills, brain structure and brain function. The investigators found that those with lower activity of the OXT gene had a harder time recognizing emotional facial expressions and tended to be more anxious about their relationships with loved ones. These low-OXT people also had less activity in brain regions associated with social thinking. And they had less gray matter in an area of the brain important for face processing and social ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Contraception, Anxiety and Stress, Emergency Contraception, Social Anxiety Disorder, Postcoital Contraception, Oxytocin, Pitocin, Diagnosis and Investigation, Syntocinon

The Childhood Incidents That Increase Later Suicide Risk

Posted 13 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, June 13, 2016 – Adults who witnessed parental domestic violence in childhood are at increased risk for suicide attempts, a new study finds. "When domestic violence is chronic in a home, there is a risk of long-term negative outcomes for the children, even when the children themselves are not abused," said study lead author Esme Fuller-Thomson. She is a professor with the University of Toronto's Faculty of Social Work. The researchers examined data from more than 22,500 Canadian adults. They found that about 17 percent of those exposed to chronic parental domestic violence (more than 10 times before age 16) had attempted suicide, compared with roughly 2 percent of those not exposed to parental domestic violence. "We had expected that the association between chronic parental domestic violence and later suicide attempts would be explained by childhood sexual or physical abuse, or ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Opiate Dependence, Major Depressive Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Drug Dependence, Dysthymia, Substance Abuse, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse

Kids Gain From More 'Dad Time'

Posted 13 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, June 13, 2016 – Fathers play a unique and important role in their children's development, a new report shows. Just in time for Father's Day, the American Academy of Pediatrics report says U.S. dads are more involved in child care than ever before. At the same time, studies show that those involved fathers have important effects on kids' health and well-being. "From everyone's standpoint, the more we can do to encourage fathers' involvement, the better," said Dr. Michael Yogman, a co-author of the report. "It's beneficial for kids. Fathers aren't just 'redundant,' doing the same things as mothers do," added Yogman, who chairs the academy's committee on psychosocial aspects of child and family health. Studies have found that older kids with involved fathers tend to have fewer depression symptoms and behavioral problems, and lower rates of teen pregnancy. When it comes to young ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress

Health Tip: Take Steps to Stay Mentally Healthy

Posted 13 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Mental health is as important as physical health, so take steps to keep yourself well. The University of Michigan Health System advises: Regularly do things you enjoy. Create a support network of friends and family. When you need help, don't be afraid to ask for it. Volunteer in your community. Find healthy ways to deal with stress, and find ways to laugh more. Set realistic goals. Don't turn to drugs and alcohol. Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Opiate Dependence, Social Anxiety Disorder, Drug Dependence, Alcoholism, Hangover, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse, Acute Alcohol Intoxication

Are 'Workaholics' Prone to OCD, Anxiety?

Posted 10 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 10, 2016 – Some workaholics may be prone to mental health disorders, compared to folks with greater work-life balance, new research suggests. These disorders may include anxiety, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and depression, the study authors said. The findings, based on a review of more than 15,000 Norwegians, suggest that "taking work to the extreme may be a sign of deeper psychiatric issues," said study lead author Cecilie Schou Andreassen. "Physicians should not take for granted that a seemingly successful workaholic doesn't have these disorders," said Schou Andreassen, a clinical psychologist with the University of Bergen, in Norway. The research doesn't delve into cause and effect, so it's not clear how mental health issues and overwork might be linked. Nor should hard workers be labeled as workaholics, although ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Panic Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Major Depressive Disorder, Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Dysthymia, Performance Anxiety

Health Tip: Recognizing Low Self-Esteem

Posted 9 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Parents should recognize the warning signs of low self-esteem and help their children overcome it. The American Academy of Pediatrics mentions these warning signs: Avoiding a challenge without any effort, or cheating. Reverting to immature behavior. Becoming bossy, rigid or controlling. Making excuses, or acting as though something isn't important when it really is. Losing interest in day-to-day activities. Performing poorly in school. Avoiding contact and activities with friends. Having difficulty accepting either criticism or praise. Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress

Women More Prone to Anxiety Than Men, Review Finds

Posted 6 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, June 6, 2016 – Struggling with anxiety? Then odds are you're a woman and you live in either North America or Western Europe. That's the conclusion of a new British study that found that women are twice as likely to suffer from anxiety as men. Moreover, people in North America and Western Europe are more prone to anxiety disorders than those from other parts of the world. In North America, nearly eight of 100 people suffer from anxiety – the most in the world. In East Asia, it's fewer than three in 100 – the lowest, the review authors noted. "Anxiety is important and shouldn't be overlooked," said lead researcher Olivia Remes, who's with the department of public health and primary care at the University of Cambridge's Strangeways Research Laboratory. "Sometimes people think that anxiety is just a part of their personality or that there's nothing they can do about it, but there ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Panic Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Agoraphobia, Performance Anxiety, Avoidant Personality Disorder

For Refugee Children, Support Breeds Success

Posted 4 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 3, 2016 – With adequate support, refugee children do as well in school as other youngsters, despite having more behavioral and emotional problems, a new research review finds. Canadian researchers analyzed data from 34 studies on learning difficulties among refugee children published between 1996 and 2015. "Despite the thousands of refugees resettled annually, there isn't a lot of research exploring learning challenges of refugee children, and no research at all on autism spectrum disorder, language impairments or dyslexia," said study co-author Dr. Ripudaman Minhas, a developmental pediatrician at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto. "However, the existing evidence suggests that children of refugee backgrounds have the potential to perform just as well as their peers when provided with supportive resources and even have similar rates of high school completion," Minhas added ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress

Mindfulness Meditation Seems to Soothe Breast Cancer Survivors

Posted 2 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 2, 2016 – Mindfulness meditation seems to help breast cancer patients better manage symptoms of fatigue, anxiety and fear of recurrence, a new study suggests. Previous research has found that mindfulness meditation can reduce stress and anxiety in the general population as well as in breast cancer survivors. But, there hadn't been many large, clinical trials to test the value of the practice among breast cancer patients, said study author Cecile Lengacher, director of the predoctoral fellowship program at the University of South Florida, in Tampa. In her study, those who took part in the six-week program had less anxiety, fear of recurrence and less fatigue compared to those who did not take the program, she found. The effect was small to moderate, she added. "It works right away," Lengacher said of the program, known as Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction. The results ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer, Metastatic, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Breast Cancer - Palliative

Music Soothes Nervous Eye Surgery Patients

Posted 29 May 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, May 27, 2016 – Listening to relaxing music before eye surgery reduces patients' anxiety and their need for sedation, a new French study suggests. "Music listening may be considered as an inexpensive, noninvasive, non-pharmacological method to reduce anxiety for patients undergoing elective eye surgery under local anaesthesia," said lead researcher Dr. Gilles Guerrier, from Cochin University Hospital in Paris. The study included 62 people who had outpatient cataract surgery while awake and under local anesthesia. The surgery lasted an average of 15 minutes. Some patients listened to relaxing music through headphones for about 15 minutes before their surgery, while others did not. Those who listened to music could choose from 16 styles, such as jazz, flamenco, Cuban, classical and piano. Compared with those who did not listen to music, patients in the music group had much lower ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Eye Conditions, Cataract, Ophthalmic Surgery, Myopia, Ophthalmic Surgical Staining, Corneal Refractive Surgery

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