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Black Children Missing Out on Eczema Treatment

Posted 10 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 13, 2017 – Black children may have more severe eczema than white children, but they are less likely to visit a doctor for this common inflammatory skin condition, new research shows. Eczema causes the skin to become red and itchy. Roughly 11 percent of children in the United States are affected by the condition, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "Previous studies have demonstrated disparities in overall health care utilization among racial and ethnic minorities, but few studies have examined this question specifically for eczema," said senior study author Dr. Junko Takeshita. She is an assistant professor of dermatology and epidemiology at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine. "This is the first study to look at racial and ethnic differences in health care utilization for eczema on an individual level rather than ... Read more

Related support groups: Skin Rash, Eczema, Dermatitis, Clobetasol, Contact Dermatitis, Fluocinonide, Atopic Dermatitis, Clobex, Desonide, Kenalog, Fleet, Desoximetasone, Elocon, Biafine, Topicort, Skin Care, Lidex, Cordran, Aquaphor, Vaseline

FDA Medwatch Alert: Piyanping Anti-Itch Lotion: Recall - Incorrect Active Ingredient

Posted 30 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

ISSUE: Lucky Mart Inc. is voluntarily recalling lots C14005, C16001 and C16002 of Piyanping Anti-Itch Lotion to the consumer level. The product was manufactured using the active pharmaceutical ingredient dexamethasone rather than hydrocortisone. Dexamethasone is not listed as an ingredient in the labeling. Dexamethasone is a higher potency steroid than hydrocortisone and may have a longer half-life; it could potentially cause serious side effects in patients applying the cream multiple times daily. There is a reasonable probability of any or all of the following side effects of topical steroids which include but are not limited to skin changes (whitening, thinning), adrenal suppression (high blood sugar, weakened immunity, electrolyte imbalances, emotional lability, slowing of growth in children), glaucoma, and cataracts. To date Lucky Mart Inc. has not received any reports of adverse ... Read more

Related support groups: Pruritus, Cortizone-10, Locoid, Locoid Lipocream, Anusol HC, Cortaid, Anucort-HC, Nutracort, Hytone, Proctozone HC, Encort, Pandel, Proctosol-HC, Corticaine, Dermarest Dricort, Hemorrhoidal HC, Tucks HC, Aquanil HC, Cortizone-10 Plus, Cortaid Maximum Strength

Eczema Can Take a Toll on Adults

Posted 27 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 27, 2017 – The itchy, rashy skin condition eczema sometimes takes a heavier toll on adults than children, an expert says. "Adult eczema patients may have dealt with their symptoms for their entire lives, which can be draining, or they may experience symptoms for the first time as adults, which can be a difficult adjustment," said Dr. Jonathan Silverberg, an assistant professor at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. "Either way, this condition can take a real toll on them," added Silverberg, director of Northwestern's Multidisciplinary Eczema Center. Some people mistakenly regard eczema as a childhood disease and not a serious health problem for adults, he said. "People who aren't familiar with the disease might say, 'It's just eczema.' But for many patients, it's not 'just eczema.' It can be debilitating," Silverberg said in a news release ... Read more

Related support groups: Eczema, Dermatitis, Clobetasol, Contact Dermatitis, Fluocinonide, Atopic Dermatitis, Clobex, Desonide, Kenalog, Desoximetasone, Elocon, Topicort, Lidex, Cordran, Halog, Cloderm, Dermatitis Herpetiformis, Cordran Tape, Olux, Cortizone-10

4 Ways to Protect Yourself Against Poison Ivy, Oak and Sumac

Posted 11 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 11, 2016 – When you're enjoying the great outdoors, be on the lookout for poison ivy, poison oak and poison sumac. The urushiol oil in their sap can cause itching, a red rash and blisters. These symptoms can appear from a few hours to several days after exposure, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Learn what these plants look like so you can avoid them. The old saying "Leaves of three, let it be" is a helpful reminder for poison ivy and poison oak. But it's not foolproof – the form may vary depending on the type of plant you encounter. Poison sumac, meanwhile, usually has clusters of 7 to 13 leaves, according to the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. If you're working in areas with these plants, wear long sleeves, long pants tucked into boots and impermeable gloves. Wash garden tools and gloves regularly. Wash pets if they may ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Promethazine, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Claritin, Loratadine, Vistaril, Allegra, Diphenhydramine, Phenergan, Cetirizine, Clobetasol, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fluocinonide, Fexofenadine, Periactin, Xyzal

Retail Prices of Dermatology Drugs Skyrocket

Posted 25 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 25, 2015 – Patients using prescription creams, gels, sprays and pills for skin conditions may shell out substantially more at the pharmacy than they did just six years ago, a new study suggests. Between 2009 and 2015, retail prices of brand-name dermatologic drugs rose 401 percent, on average, study authors reported Nov. 25 in JAMA Dermatology. Even generics have succumbed to price inflation, up 279 percent between 2011 and 2014, based on the drugs surveyed. Price increases for skin treatments far outpaced the general inflation rate of 11 percent during the six-year study period, the researchers said. "Cancer drugs were the worst in terms of the numbers" – up 1,240 percent or nearly $11,000 over the six-year study period – primarily because of two medicines, said Dr. Steven Rosenberg, voluntary professor of dermatology at the University of Miami Miller School of ... Read more

Related support groups: Monistat, RID, Monistat 3, Eczema, Monistat 7, Voltaren Gel, Dermatitis, Maintain, Clobetasol, Therapeutic, Contact Dermatitis, Mupirocin, Efudex, Bactroban, Lidoderm, Drysol, Sulfur, Epiduo, Hypercare, Fluocinonide

Health Tip: Coping With Mosquito Bites

Posted 1 Sep 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Mosquito bites are itchy and annoying, and tough to ignore when they're virtually screaming "scratch me!" The Mayo Clinic recommends: applying calamine lotion, using hydrocortisone cream, applying an ice pack or cold compress, combating a more significant allergic reaction by taking an oral, over-the-counter antihistamine. Read more

Related support groups: Clobetasol, Fluocinonide, Clobex, Desonide, Kenalog, Calamine, Desoximetasone, Elocon, Topicort, Lidex, Cordran, Halog, Cloderm, Olux, Cordran Tape, Insect Bites, Cortizone-10, Halobetasol, Locoid, Caladryl

Got a Rash? You Might Be Allergic to Nickel, Dermatologist Says

Posted 20 Aug 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 20, 2015 – Nickel is one of the most common causes of a skin rash that occurs due to contact with an allergen, a dermatologist says. This type of rash, allergic contact dermatitis, can be caused by nickel in jewelry, a patient's diet, nickel in a medical implant or nickel in a medication that's applied to the skin, said Dr. Jennifer Chen, a clinical assistant professor of dermatology at Stanford Hospital and Clinics, in Stanford, Calif. Typically, an allergic reaction to this metal occurs in an area of skin that comes into contact with an item such as a necklace, belt buckle, zipper, eyeglass frames or cellphone. But nickel in foods can cause an allergic reaction that is more widespread on the body. Foods high in nickel include nuts, seeds, chocolate, wheat and rye, Chen said. "Although allergic reactions to dietary nickel are not as common as nickel allergies overall, ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Promethazine, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Claritin, Vistaril, Loratadine, Allegra, Diphenhydramine, Dermatitis, Phenergan, Cetirizine, Clobetasol, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fluocinonide, Fexofenadine, Periactin

Health Tip: Treating Poison Ivy

Posted 25 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

-- If you've been exposed to poison ivy, a few suggestions can help ease the itch, prevent the rash's spread and reduce your risk of skin infection. The American Academy of Dermatology suggests: Immediately after possible exposure, use soap and lukewarm water to wash the skin. Avoid scrubbing areas already laden with a poison ivy rash. Remove all clothing that could have touched the plant, and wash immediately. Use lukewarm soapy water to wash anything that may have touched the plant, including gardening tools, golf clubs, pet fur or pet leashes. Don't scratch the area, since doing so could lead to a skin infection. Don't rub or remove peeling skin. Soothe itchy skin with a short, lukewarm bath in colloidal oatmeal or baking soda. Then apply calamine lotion or hydrocortisone to help ease itching. Use a cool compress to soothe itchy skin, or take an oral antihistamine. Read more

Related support groups: Benadryl, Promethazine, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Claritin, Vistaril, Loratadine, Allegra, Diphenhydramine, Phenergan, Cetirizine, Clobetasol, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fluocinonide, Fexofenadine, Periactin, Xyzal, Chlorpheniramine, Clobex

Poison Ivy's Gonna Get Ya...

Posted 7 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, June 6, 2015 – Poison ivy, oak and sumac are common outdoor hazards, but there are a number of ways to prevent exposure and reduce your suffering if you do come into contact with these plants, an expert says. "Millions of Americans every year develop an allergic rash after being exposed, and these poisonous plants are pretty much everywhere in the United States except Alaska and Hawaii," Renee Miller, from the Tennessee Poison Center at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, said in center news release. Oils in the plants' leaves, roots and vines get into the skin almost immediately after contact and bind with proteins, causing an immune system reaction that leads to extreme itchiness. "If there's a risk for exposure, wear long pants, long sleeves, gloves and boots," Miller said. But she noted that rubber gloves won't protect you because the plant oils are soluble in rubber ... Read more

Related support groups: Skin Rash, Benadryl, Promethazine, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Claritin, Loratadine, Vistaril, Allegra, Diphenhydramine, Phenergan, Cetirizine, Clobetasol, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fluocinonide, Fexofenadine, Periactin, Xyzal, Chlorpheniramine

Health Tip: Caring for Bug Bites

Posted 5 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Bug bites can be more than a nuisance. It's important to care for them properly to avoid infection. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advises: If you have a bite, don't scratch it. Use calamine lotion or hydrocortisone cream to ease itching. Take a bath or shower as soon as you come inside to help get rid of ticks. Prevent tick bites by carefully inspecting your body (notably the underarms, in and around ears, belly button, backs of the knees, legs, waist and hair). Use a mirror for those hard-to-see places. If you find a tick, remove it carefully. Check for ticks on children and pets and any belongings you kept outside. Read more

Related support groups: Hives, Urticaria, Calamine, Cortizone-10, Locoid, Locoid Lipocream, Anusol HC, Cortaid, Anucort-HC, Nutracort, Hytone, Proctozone HC, Encort, Pandel, Proctosol-HC, Corticaine, Dermarest Dricort, Hemorrhoidal HC, Tucks HC, Aquanil HC

Use of Low-Dose Steroid Creams During Pregnancy Won't Affect Baby: Study

Posted 4 Sep 2013 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 4 – Women who apply prescription steroid creams such as cortisone to ease a medical issue during pregnancy should not worry that the medication will affect their baby, a new study finds. "Cortisone [creams] can be a very powerful drug for a pregnant woman suffering from a variety of conditions both related and unrelated to pregnancy," noted one expert, Dr. Doris Day, a dermatologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. "In many cases, there are no substitutes that will relieve the itch and suffering of the conditions, which without proper treatment with cortisone are not only miserable to tolerate but can also lead to permanent scarring," said Day, who was not connected to the new study. Reassuringly, the researchers found that use of corticosteroid gels or creams during pregnancy is not linked to an increased risk for certain complications, including premature ... Read more

Related support groups: Clobetasol, Fluocinonide, Clobex, Desonide, Kenalog, Desoximetasone, Elocon, Topicort, Lidex, Cordran, Halog, Cordran Tape, Olux, Cloderm, Cortizone-10, Locoid, Halobetasol, Beta-Val, Betnovate, Vanos

Kids With Psoriasis Get Inconsistent Care

Posted 21 Sep 2011 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 21 – How children are treated for psoriasis may depend on whether they see a pediatrician, dermatologist or internist, a new study suggests. About 1 percent of children from birth to age 18 are affected by psoriasis, a skin condition that can lead to patches of itchy, flaky, dry skin. Researchers from University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine and colleagues examined records from physicians on their pediatric psoriasis patients who scheduled visits over the course of nearly three decades. Of 3.8 million visits, about 63 percent of kids saw a dermatologist; 17 percent saw a pediatrician; and 14 percent went to an internist. Researchers found that pediatricians, dermatologists and internists often take different approaches to how they treat children with psoriasis, including what types of medication they use and how strong it is. "Management of psoriasis ... Read more

Related support groups: Psoriasis, Clobetasol, Fluocinonide, Clobex, Desonide, Kenalog, Desoximetasone, Elocon, Topicort, Protopic, Lidex, Cordran, Halog, Cloderm, Olux, Cordran Tape, Cortizone-10, Locoid, Halobetasol, Beta-Val

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