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Anemia News

Could Anemia Cause Hearing Loss?

Posted 30 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 29, 2016 – Hearing loss may be linked to iron deficiency anemia – a combination of low levels of iron and red blood cells, new research suggests. The study found that people with iron deficiency anemia have more than twice the rate of hearing loss as people without the blood disorder. The association between hearing loss and iron deficiency anemia was particularly strong for two types of hearing loss – one called sensorineural and combined sensorineural and conductive hearing loss. Sensorineural hearing loss occurs when the inner ear or the nerve pathway from the inner ear to the brain is damaged, according to the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA). Conductive hearing loss is when sounds aren't efficiently conducted from the outer ear to the eardrum or middle ear. Combined hearing loss is a mixture of the two, according to ASHA. Sensorineural hearing ... Read more

Related support groups: Anemia, Iron Deficiency Anemia, Hearing Loss, Anemia Associated with Iron Deficiency

Blood Banks Face Seasonal Shortages, New Screening Rules

Posted 23 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 23, 2016 – There's typically a shortage of both blood and platelets during the holiday season. But, tighter testing for a rare complication of transfusions makes the need for platelets even more urgent, experts at UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas say. Platelets are a component of blood that are essential for clotting. The complication, called transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI), is the leading cause of death due to transfusions, the experts said. "One reason the supply of blood platelets has decreased is that we now have additional required testing of platelets after donation," said Dr. Thomas Froehlich, medical director at the Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center. Blood and platelet shortages are traditionally common during the holidays. The shortages put cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, trauma victims and people with health issues that ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Bleeding Disorder, Anemia, Blood Transfusion, Folic Acid Deficiency, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Bleeding Associated with Coagulation Defect, Anemia Associated with Chronic Disease, Blood Cell Transplantation

Drones a Safe Way to Transport Blood: Study

Posted 9 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 9, 2016 – Blood products don't seem to suffer damage when transported by drones, researchers report. The findings lend support to advocates who say that drones could offer a safe, effective and fast way to deliver blood products to accident sites, natural disasters or remote locations. "My vision is that, in the future, when a first responder arrives to the scene of an accident, he or she can test the victim's blood type right on the spot and send for a drone to bring the correct blood product," study first author Dr. Timothy Amukele said in a Johns Hopkins University news release. He is an assistant professor of pathology at the university's School of Medicine in Baltimore. Amukele and his Hopkins colleagues placed large bags of blood products – the size used for transfusion – into a cooler loaded on a drone that was flown 8 to 12 miles at about 328 feet off the ground. ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Anemia, Blood Transfusion, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Blood Cell Transplantation

Another Step Closer to Artificial Blood

Posted 4 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, Dec. 3, 2016 – Artificial blood stored as a powder could one day revolutionize emergency medicine and provide trauma victims a better chance of survival. Researchers have created an artificial red blood cell that effectively picks up oxygen in the lungs and delivers it to tissues throughout the body. This artificial blood can be freeze-dried, making it easier for combat medics and paramedics to keep on hand for emergencies, said senior researcher Dr. Allan Doctor. He is a critical care specialist at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. "It's a dried powder that looks like paprika, basically," Doctor said. "It can be stored in an IV plastic bag that a medic would carry, either in their ambulance or in a backpack, for a year or more. When they need to use it, they spike the bag with sterile water, mix it, and it's ready to inject right then and there." The ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Bleeding Disorder, Anemia, Blood Transfusion, Diagnosis and Investigation, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Blood Cell Transplantation

Chronic Disease in Mom May Be Linked to Newborns' Heart Disease

Posted 11 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 – Babies born to mothers with certain chronic diseases may be at increased risk for heart problems, a new study suggests. The analysis included millions of births in Taiwan. The researchers found that pregnant women who themselves had been born with heart defects or who later developed type 2 diabetes were more apt to have babies born with severe heart disease ("congenital" disease). The study didn't prove a cause-and-effect link. However, babies of mothers with these conditions should be closely monitored after birth, according to the researchers. The investigators said they also found a slightly higher risk of mild congenital heart problems in babies of mothers with several other chronic diseases, including: type 1 diabetes, high blood pressure, anemia and epilepsy. "Although some maternal diseases were associated with congenital heart disease in offspring, ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Type 2, Seizures, Hypertension, Heart Disease, Epilepsy, Anemia, Ischemic Heart Disease, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Heart Birth Defects Dropped After Folic Acid Was Added to Food

Posted 29 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 29, 2016 – The introduction of folic acid-fortified foods in Canada was associated with a decrease in babies being born with heart defects, a new study found. Researchers reviewed data from nearly 6 million births in Canada. The births occurred between 1990 and 2011. Folic acid food fortification became mandatory for all types of flour, enriched pasta and cornmeal in 1998 in Canada. During the study period, there was an 11 percent decline in rates of congenital heart defects overall. But decreases weren't seen in all types of heart defects present at birth. The biggest declines – between 15 percent and 27 percent – were in structural defects of the heart, such as holes in the wall of the heart or a narrowing of the major artery (the aorta) that carries blood to the body from the heart, the investigators found. But, there was no reduction in heart defects at birth caused ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Emergency Contraception, Anemia, Postcoital Contraception, Folic Acid Deficiency, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Spina bifida, Brain Anomalies incl Congenital

Health Tip: Managing Anemia With Iron

Posted 18 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Iron deficiency is a common cause of anemia, the lack of a protein called hemoglobin that's needed to carry oxygen-rich blood throughout your body. If your doctor prescribes an iron supplement, the American Academy of Family Physicians suggests: Always take the supplement with something to eat. Increase your dose gradually to your doctor's prescribed amount. If you become constipated, increase fiber in the foods you eat. If the pills upset your stomach, avoid taking them before bed. If the supplement has too many side effects, ask your doctor about switching brands. Read more

Related support groups: Anemia, Iron Deficiency Anemia, Anemia Associated with Iron Deficiency, Docusate/iron/multivitamin

Anemia Boosts Stroke Death Risk, Study Finds

Posted 18 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 17, 2016 – Older stroke victims suffering from anemia – a lack of red blood cells – may have higher odds of dying, researchers report. Among thousands of stroke patients, those who were anemic had a 1.5 to two times higher risk of dying within a year compared with patients without anemia, said Dr. Phyo Myint, lead researcher on the new study. "There is no clear evidence to suggest treating anemia will prevent stroke, but like in many other conditions, people with anemia should find out why they are anemic and treat the cause if possible," said Myint. He is a professor of medicine of old age at the University of Aberdeen in Scotland. However, why anemia increases the risk of death after stroke isn't clear, Myint said. Anemia is common in stroke patients, he added. Older people in general often have anemia or low levels of hemoglobin, the proteins in red blood cells ... Read more

Related support groups: Ischemic Stroke, Anemia, Transient Ischemic Attack, Iron Deficiency Anemia, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis

Roll Up Your Sleeves: Red Cross Says Blood Need 'Urgent'

Posted 26 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 26, 2016 – The American Red Cross says it has an urgent need for blood donations, with less than a five-day supply of blood on hand to help those who need it. "The Red Cross continues to have an emergency need for blood and platelet donors to give now and help save patient lives," Nick Gehrig, communications director for Red Cross Blood Services, said in a news release. The organization noted it first alerted Americans to the need for blood and platelet donations back in early July. And while donation levels did rise, "a critical blood shortage remains," the group said. "At times, blood and platelets are being distributed to hospitals faster than donations are coming in, which impacts the ability to rebuild the blood supply," the Red Cross explained. Right now, the national supply has dipped below the five-day level the Red Cross says it needs to make sure it's ready for ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Anemia, Blood Transfusion, Anemia Associated with Chronic Disease, Blood Cell Transplantation

2 New Findings Offer Hope for Those With Severe Hemophilia

Posted 26 May 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 25, 2016 – Two new studies could pave the way to major changes in how doctors treat severe cases of hemophilia – a rare genetic disorder that can cause uncontrolled bleeding. Both studies tackle a key challenge: Up to one-third of children with severe hemophilia develop antibodies against the standard therapy. But one study highlights the value of an old therapy, while the other shows promising early results with an experimental drug. Experts said both should stir discussion among doctors, patients and parents who deal with hemophilia. But they were especially hopeful about the new drug, known as emicizumab. In the United States, about 20,000 people – mostly boys and men – are living with hemophilia, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The disorder is caused by a defect in one of the genes that controls proteins needed for normal blood ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Bleeding Disorder, Anemia, Blood Transfusion, Hemophilia A, Hemophilia B, Hemophilia, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Blood Cell Transplantation, Hemophilia A with Inhibitors

Drug Protects Lung Function in Kids With Sickle Cell: Study

Posted 18 May 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 18, 2016 – Children with sickle cell disease may breathe easier when they're given hydroxyurea – an effective, but underused, drug for the disease, new research suggests. In a study of 94 young people with sickle cell, researchers found that hydroxyurea helped slow the decline in lung function that is typical of the disease. The study appears to be the first to show that hydroxyurea can preserve kids' lung function, said lead researcher Dr. Anya McLaren, of the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto. She said the findings should give doctors more reason to prescribe hydroxyurea. The drug, she noted, is already known to prevent severe bouts of pain and serious lung complications in people with sickle cell. An expert who was not involved with the study agreed. "This is further confirmation that this medication is beneficial," said Dr. George Buchanan. He is a pediatric ... Read more

Related support groups: Anemia, Hydroxyurea, Hydrea, Anemia - Sickle Cell, Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Droxia, Mylocel

Health Tip: Donating Blood

Posted 2 May 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Typically, you must be at least 17 years old and meet a few health criteria to donate blood. If you're able, it's a great way to help save lives. The American Red Cross offers this advice on what to expect: One blood donation can help save the lives of three other people. The donation procedure is safe and easy. While the donation itself only takes about 10 minutes, expect to be at the donation center for about an hour. Prepare for donation by making sure you're well-hydrated. Eat a nutritious meal, skipping any foods that are high in fat. Make sure your shirt sleeves can be rolled up above the elbows. Bring your driver's license or a donor ID card. If you're 16 and donating in a state that allows it, bring signed parental consent. Also bring a list of any medications you take. If you're feeling sick beforehand, reschedule the donation. Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Bleeding Disorder, Anemia, Blood Transfusion, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Anemia Associated with Chronic Disease, Blood Cell Transplantation

FDA: Wait a Month to Donate Blood After Travel to Zika-Prone Areas

Posted 17 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 16, 2016 – To protect the U.S. blood supply, people who've traveled to places where the Zika virus is prevalent, or who have symptoms that suggest infection, should wait a month before donating blood, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced Tuesday. Four weeks is enough time for the virus to pass through a person's system, the agency said. The mosquito-borne Zika virus is thought – but not proven – to be behind an epidemic of birth defects that leave newborns with very small heads and possible brain damage. According to the FDA, people considered to be at risk for Zika include those who have: Traveled to areas with active transmission of Zika virus during the past four weeks. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now lists 30 countries and territories in Latin America and the Caribbean as places with active Zika infection. Engaged in sexual ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Anemia, Blood Transfusion, Blood Cell Transplantation

Anemia Drugs May Not Boost Kidney Patients' Well-Being: Study

Posted 16 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 15, 2016 – The pricey anemia drugs often given to people with chronic kidney disease may make no difference in how they feel day to day, a new research review confirms. Researchers said the study results back up current guidelines on how to use the drugs, called erythropoietin-stimulating agents (ESAs). These include the injection drugs marketed under the names Procrit, Epogen and Aranesp. Patients may still benefit from the medications because they reduce the need for blood transfusions to treat severe anemia, said Dr. Navdeep Tangri, senior researcher on the study. "But this should close the book on the idea that these drugs help with exhaustion and improve patients' quality of life," said Tangri, an attending doctor at Seven Oaks General Hospital Renal Program in Manitoba, Canada. However, one expert argued that while on average, that is true, some patients do feel ... Read more

Related support groups: Anemia, Renal Failure, Chronic Kidney Disease, Peritoneal dialysis, Aranesp, Procrit, Epogen, Renal Osteodystrophy, Darbepoetin Alfa, Mircera, Anemia Associated with Chronic Disease, Epoetin Beta-Methoxy Polyethylene Glycol, Omontys, Peginesatide, Hyperphosphatemia of Renal Failure, Epoetin Alfa

Blood Donors Needed After East Coast Storm: Red Cross

Posted 26 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 26, 2016 – Jonas, the massive snowstorm that hammered the East Coast, has led to a shortage of blood products and there is an emergency need for both blood and platelet donors, the American Red Cross said Tuesday. "The impact of this weekend's winter storm continues to affect multiple states along the East Coast, and more blood drives will likely be canceled. Right now, blood products are being distributed to hospitals as quickly as donations come in," the Red Cross said in a news release. Since Jan. 1, severe winter weather has led to the cancellation of more than 300 blood drives in 20 states, resulting in about 9,500 fewer donations to an already low winter supply, the Red Cross noted. Blood products can be transported where and when they are most needed, so donors in areas unaffected by the winter storm are encouraged to make blood and platelet donations, the Red ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Anemia, Blood Transfusion, Anemia Associated with Chronic Disease, Blood Cell Transplantation

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Iron Deficiency Anemia, Anemia, Megaloblastic, Anemia Associated with Iron Deficiency, Anemia - Sickle Cell, Anemia Associated with Chronic Disease, Thalassemia, Anemia - Chemotherapy Induced, Anemia Associated with Vitamin B12 Deficiency, Anemia - Posthemorrhagic, view more... Aplastic Anemia, Anemia - Drug Induced, Hemolytic Anemia, Anemia of Unspecified Nutritional Deficiency, Anemia, folate-deficiency, Anemia Prior to Surgery, Erythroblastopenia, Anemia Associated with Prematurity, Blood Disorders

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