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Anemia News

Chronic Disease in Mom May Be Linked to Newborns' Heart Disease

Posted 11 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 – Babies born to mothers with certain chronic diseases may be at increased risk for heart problems, a new study suggests. The analysis included millions of births in Taiwan. The researchers found that pregnant women who themselves had been born with heart defects or who later developed type 2 diabetes were more apt to have babies born with severe heart disease ("congenital" disease). The study didn't prove a cause-and-effect link. However, babies of mothers with these conditions should be closely monitored after birth, according to the researchers. The investigators said they also found a slightly higher risk of mild congenital heart problems in babies of mothers with several other chronic diseases, including: type 1 diabetes, high blood pressure, anemia and epilepsy. "Although some maternal diseases were associated with congenital heart disease in offspring, ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Type 2, Seizures, Hypertension, Heart Disease, Epilepsy, Anemia, Ischemic Heart Disease, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Heart Birth Defects Dropped After Folic Acid Was Added to Food

Posted 29 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 29, 2016 – The introduction of folic acid-fortified foods in Canada was associated with a decrease in babies being born with heart defects, a new study found. Researchers reviewed data from nearly 6 million births in Canada. The births occurred between 1990 and 2011. Folic acid food fortification became mandatory for all types of flour, enriched pasta and cornmeal in 1998 in Canada. During the study period, there was an 11 percent decline in rates of congenital heart defects overall. But decreases weren't seen in all types of heart defects present at birth. The biggest declines – between 15 percent and 27 percent – were in structural defects of the heart, such as holes in the wall of the heart or a narrowing of the major artery (the aorta) that carries blood to the body from the heart, the investigators found. But, there was no reduction in heart defects at birth caused ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Emergency Contraception, Anemia, Postcoital Contraception, Folic Acid Deficiency, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Spina bifida, Brain Anomalies incl Congenital

Health Tip: Managing Anemia With Iron

Posted 18 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Iron deficiency is a common cause of anemia, the lack of a protein called hemoglobin that's needed to carry oxygen-rich blood throughout your body. If your doctor prescribes an iron supplement, the American Academy of Family Physicians suggests: Always take the supplement with something to eat. Increase your dose gradually to your doctor's prescribed amount. If you become constipated, increase fiber in the foods you eat. If the pills upset your stomach, avoid taking them before bed. If the supplement has too many side effects, ask your doctor about switching brands. Read more

Related support groups: Anemia, Iron Deficiency Anemia, Anemia Associated with Iron Deficiency, Docusate/iron/multivitamin

Anemia Boosts Stroke Death Risk, Study Finds

Posted 18 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 17, 2016 – Older stroke victims suffering from anemia – a lack of red blood cells – may have higher odds of dying, researchers report. Among thousands of stroke patients, those who were anemic had a 1.5 to two times higher risk of dying within a year compared with patients without anemia, said Dr. Phyo Myint, lead researcher on the new study. "There is no clear evidence to suggest treating anemia will prevent stroke, but like in many other conditions, people with anemia should find out why they are anemic and treat the cause if possible," said Myint. He is a professor of medicine of old age at the University of Aberdeen in Scotland. However, why anemia increases the risk of death after stroke isn't clear, Myint said. Anemia is common in stroke patients, he added. Older people in general often have anemia or low levels of hemoglobin, the proteins in red blood cells ... Read more

Related support groups: Ischemic Stroke, Anemia, Transient Ischemic Attack, Iron Deficiency Anemia, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis

Roll Up Your Sleeves: Red Cross Says Blood Need 'Urgent'

Posted 26 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 26, 2016 – The American Red Cross says it has an urgent need for blood donations, with less than a five-day supply of blood on hand to help those who need it. "The Red Cross continues to have an emergency need for blood and platelet donors to give now and help save patient lives," Nick Gehrig, communications director for Red Cross Blood Services, said in a news release. The organization noted it first alerted Americans to the need for blood and platelet donations back in early July. And while donation levels did rise, "a critical blood shortage remains," the group said. "At times, blood and platelets are being distributed to hospitals faster than donations are coming in, which impacts the ability to rebuild the blood supply," the Red Cross explained. Right now, the national supply has dipped below the five-day level the Red Cross says it needs to make sure it's ready for ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Anemia, Blood Transfusion, Anemia Associated with Chronic Disease, Blood Cell Transplantation

2 New Findings Offer Hope for Those With Severe Hemophilia

Posted 26 May 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 25, 2016 – Two new studies could pave the way to major changes in how doctors treat severe cases of hemophilia – a rare genetic disorder that can cause uncontrolled bleeding. Both studies tackle a key challenge: Up to one-third of children with severe hemophilia develop antibodies against the standard therapy. But one study highlights the value of an old therapy, while the other shows promising early results with an experimental drug. Experts said both should stir discussion among doctors, patients and parents who deal with hemophilia. But they were especially hopeful about the new drug, known as emicizumab. In the United States, about 20,000 people – mostly boys and men – are living with hemophilia, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The disorder is caused by a defect in one of the genes that controls proteins needed for normal blood ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Bleeding Disorder, Anemia, Blood Transfusion, Hemophilia A, Hemophilia B, Hemophilia, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Blood Cell Transplantation, Hemophilia A with Inhibitors

Drug Protects Lung Function in Kids With Sickle Cell: Study

Posted 18 May 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 18, 2016 – Children with sickle cell disease may breathe easier when they're given hydroxyurea – an effective, but underused, drug for the disease, new research suggests. In a study of 94 young people with sickle cell, researchers found that hydroxyurea helped slow the decline in lung function that is typical of the disease. The study appears to be the first to show that hydroxyurea can preserve kids' lung function, said lead researcher Dr. Anya McLaren, of the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto. She said the findings should give doctors more reason to prescribe hydroxyurea. The drug, she noted, is already known to prevent severe bouts of pain and serious lung complications in people with sickle cell. An expert who was not involved with the study agreed. "This is further confirmation that this medication is beneficial," said Dr. George Buchanan. He is a pediatric ... Read more

Related support groups: Anemia, Hydroxyurea, Anemia - Sickle Cell, Hydrea, Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Droxia, Mylocel

Health Tip: Donating Blood

Posted 2 May 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Typically, you must be at least 17 years old and meet a few health criteria to donate blood. If you're able, it's a great way to help save lives. The American Red Cross offers this advice on what to expect: One blood donation can help save the lives of three other people. The donation procedure is safe and easy. While the donation itself only takes about 10 minutes, expect to be at the donation center for about an hour. Prepare for donation by making sure you're well-hydrated. Eat a nutritious meal, skipping any foods that are high in fat. Make sure your shirt sleeves can be rolled up above the elbows. Bring your driver's license or a donor ID card. If you're 16 and donating in a state that allows it, bring signed parental consent. Also bring a list of any medications you take. If you're feeling sick beforehand, reschedule the donation. Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Bleeding Disorder, Anemia, Blood Transfusion, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Anemia Associated with Chronic Disease, Blood Cell Transplantation

FDA: Wait a Month to Donate Blood After Travel to Zika-Prone Areas

Posted 17 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 16, 2016 – To protect the U.S. blood supply, people who've traveled to places where the Zika virus is prevalent, or who have symptoms that suggest infection, should wait a month before donating blood, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced Tuesday. Four weeks is enough time for the virus to pass through a person's system, the agency said. The mosquito-borne Zika virus is thought – but not proven – to be behind an epidemic of birth defects that leave newborns with very small heads and possible brain damage. According to the FDA, people considered to be at risk for Zika include those who have: Traveled to areas with active transmission of Zika virus during the past four weeks. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now lists 30 countries and territories in Latin America and the Caribbean as places with active Zika infection. Engaged in sexual ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Anemia, Blood Transfusion, Blood Cell Transplantation

Anemia Drugs May Not Boost Kidney Patients' Well-Being: Study

Posted 16 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 15, 2016 – The pricey anemia drugs often given to people with chronic kidney disease may make no difference in how they feel day to day, a new research review confirms. Researchers said the study results back up current guidelines on how to use the drugs, called erythropoietin-stimulating agents (ESAs). These include the injection drugs marketed under the names Procrit, Epogen and Aranesp. Patients may still benefit from the medications because they reduce the need for blood transfusions to treat severe anemia, said Dr. Navdeep Tangri, senior researcher on the study. "But this should close the book on the idea that these drugs help with exhaustion and improve patients' quality of life," said Tangri, an attending doctor at Seven Oaks General Hospital Renal Program in Manitoba, Canada. However, one expert argued that while on average, that is true, some patients do feel ... Read more

Related support groups: Anemia, Renal Failure, Chronic Kidney Disease, Aranesp, Peritoneal dialysis, Procrit, Epogen, Renal Osteodystrophy, Darbepoetin Alfa, Mircera, Epoetin Beta-Methoxy Polyethylene Glycol, Anemia Associated with Chronic Disease, Peginesatide, Hyperphosphatemia of Renal Failure, Epoetin Alfa, Omontys

Blood Donors Needed After East Coast Storm: Red Cross

Posted 26 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 26, 2016 – Jonas, the massive snowstorm that hammered the East Coast, has led to a shortage of blood products and there is an emergency need for both blood and platelet donors, the American Red Cross said Tuesday. "The impact of this weekend's winter storm continues to affect multiple states along the East Coast, and more blood drives will likely be canceled. Right now, blood products are being distributed to hospitals as quickly as donations come in," the Red Cross said in a news release. Since Jan. 1, severe winter weather has led to the cancellation of more than 300 blood drives in 20 states, resulting in about 9,500 fewer donations to an already low winter supply, the Red Cross noted. Blood products can be transported where and when they are most needed, so donors in areas unaffected by the winter storm are encouraged to make blood and platelet donations, the Red ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Anemia, Blood Transfusion, Anemia Associated with Chronic Disease, Blood Cell Transplantation

FDA Lifts Ban on Blood Donations by Gay Men

Posted 21 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Dec. 21, 2015 – Gay and bisexual men who have abstained from sex for one year will now be allowed to donate blood in the United States. The new policy, announced Monday by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, reverses a three-decades-old ban on donations from this group of men that traces back to the start of the AIDS epidemic. "The FDA's responsibility is to maintain a high level of blood product safety for people whose lives depend on it," FDA Acting Commissioner Stephen Ostroff said in an agency news release. "We have taken great care to ensure this policy revision is backed by sound science and continues to protect our blood supply." The FDA said it was changing its policy based on data from other countries that show allowing such donations would not increase the risk of HIV-tainted blood entering America's blood supply. FDA officials have estimated that about half of the ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Bleeding Disorder, Harvoni, HIV Infection, Valtrex, Anemia, Acyclovir, Tamiflu, Atripla, Valacyclovir, Ribavirin, Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis, Incivek, Blood Transfusion, Zovirax, Truvada, Stribild, Complera, Triumeq, Baraclude

Assessing Health Issues of Child Refugees

Posted 29 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 27, 2015 – The main health problems of refugee children from Asia and Africa when they arrive in the United States are outlined in a new study. Based on screenings of more than 8,100 young refugees between 2006 and 2012, the top health concerns were hepatitis B, tuberculosis, parasitic worms, high blood lead levels and anemia, the study found. The refugees, all younger than 19, were from Bhutan, Myanmar, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Iraq and Somalia. The screenings were conducted shortly after they arrived in Colorado, Minnesota, Pennsylvania and Washington state. In general, these conditions were more common among children from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia and Somalia, and lower among those from Iraq, researchers said. Among refugees from Myanmar, those who came to the United States from Thailand had more diseases than those who came ... Read more

Related support groups: Anemia, Hepatitis B, Tuberculosis - Latent, Tuberculosis - Active, Lead Poisoning, Helminthic Infection, Worms and Flukes

Health Tip: Recognizing Signs of Anemia

Posted 18 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Anemia occurs when there are insufficient red blood cells, or they don't function properly. The American Society of Hematology says warning signs include: Feeling weak or dizzy. Having colder hands and feet. Having pale skin or a yellow tint. Feeling short of breath. Having an irregular or fast heartbeat. Hearing a whooshing sound or pounding in the ears. Having frequent chest pain or headache. Read more

Related support groups: Anemia, Iron Deficiency Anemia, Anemia - Sickle Cell, Folic Acid Deficiency, Aplastic Anemia, Pernicious Anemia, B12 Nutritional Deficiency, Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia, Anemia Associated with Iron Deficiency, Hemolytic Anemia, Anemia, Megaloblastic, Schilling Test, Anemia Associated with Vitamin B12 Deficiency, Anemia Associated with Chronic Disease, Anemia - Posthemorrhagic, Erythroblastopenia, Anemia, folate-deficiency, Anemia Prior to Surgery, G-6-PD Deficiency, Anemia Associated with Prematurity

Researchers Report Progress in Making All Blood Types Universally Accepted

Posted 21 May 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, May 21, 2015 – Scientists are closing in on a way to transform any type of donated blood into type O, the universal blood type that can safely be given to any patient. Researchers have created a special enzyme that can shear off the substances on red blood cells that are responsible for potentially fatal immune reactions if a patient receives the wrong type of blood, according to a new study. The enzyme is not yet effective enough to allow for large-scale processing to convert type A or type B blood into type O, said lead author David Kwan, a postdoctoral fellow of chemistry at the University of British Columbia's Centre for Blood Research in Vancouver, Canada. "We're not there yet. This is really a step towards that," Kwan said. "The big thing is that we've shown that it's feasible to improve these enzymes." Results of the study were published online recently in the Journal ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Bleeding Disorder, Anemia, Blood Transfusion, Exchange Transfusion, Blood Cell Transplantation, Anemia Prior to Surgery

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Iron Deficiency Anemia, Anemia, Megaloblastic, Anemia Associated with Iron Deficiency, Anemia - Sickle Cell, Anemia Associated with Chronic Disease, Thalassemia, Anemia - Chemotherapy Induced, Anemia Associated with Vitamin B12 Deficiency, Anemia - Posthemorrhagic, view more... Anemia - Drug Induced, Aplastic Anemia, Hemolytic Anemia, Anemia of Unspecified Nutritional Deficiency, Anemia, folate-deficiency, Anemia Prior to Surgery, Erythroblastopenia, Anemia Associated with Prematurity, Blood Disorders

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