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Androgenetic Alopecia News

Related terms: Baldness, male, Male pattern baldness

Haywire Immune Cells May Help Cause Baldness

Posted 4 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, May 25, 2017 – Faulty immune cells may play a role in hair loss, a new study suggests. In experiments with mice, researchers found that regulatory T-cells ("Tregs") – a type of immune cell that helps control inflammation – trigger stem cells in the skin to promote hair growth. If Tregs are missing, those stem cells can't regenerate hair follicles, the University of California, San Francisco team found. "Our hair follicles are constantly recycling: when a hair falls out, the whole hair follicle has to grow back," study senior author Dr. Michael Rosenblum said in a university news release. "This has been thought to be an entirely stem cell-dependent process, but it turns out Tregs are essential. If you knock out this one immune cell type, hair just doesn't grow," he explained. Rosenblum is an assistant professor of dermatology and is also an immunologist. The findings suggest ... Read more

Related support groups: Alopecia, Androgenetic Alopecia, Diagnosis and Investigation

Scientists Uncover Root of Graying, Thinning Hair

Posted 8 May 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 8, 2017 – Changes in your hair – whether it's graying hair or hair loss – are a bane of aging. But if new research in mice pans out in humans, you could one day cross worries about your mane off your list of concerns about getting older. That's because researchers accidently pinpointed skin cells linked to gray hair and balding while they were conducting research on a specific type of cancer that affects nerve cells. The investigators believe their discovery could someday lead to new treatments to stop baldness and graying hair. "Although this project was started in an effort to understand how certain kinds of tumors form, we ended up learning why hair turns gray and discovering the identity of the cell that directly gives rise to hair," said study author Dr. Lu Le. He is an associate professor of dermatology at UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. "With this ... Read more

Related support groups: Alopecia, Androgenetic Alopecia

The Grayer His Hair, the Higher His Heart Risk?

Posted 11 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, April 10, 2017 – Beyond signaling the march of time, gray hair may also point to a higher risk of heart disease for men, new research suggests. But don't panic if you sport silvery locks – the study only showed an association, not a cause-and-effect link, between hair color and heart risks. The finding stems from an analysis that looked at 545 adult men for signs of heart trouble, and then cross-referenced the results with hair color. "In our population, a high hair-whitening score was associated with an increased risk of atherosclerotic coronary artery disease," said study author Irini Samuel. She is a cardiologist at Cairo University, in Egypt. Atherosclerosis refers to the build-up of plaque in the arteries. Samuel said the finding held up regardless of a man's age or whether or not he was already known to face a high risk for developing heart disease. The frequency with ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Androgenetic Alopecia, Acute Coronary Syndrome - Prophylaxis, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis

Drugs for Prostate Trouble, Balding Not Linked to Suicide Risk

Posted 20 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, March 20, 2017 – Drugs used to treat enlarged prostate and male pattern baldness may raise an older man's risk of depression and self-harm, but not their risk of suicide, a new study finds. The study focused on a class of medications called 5a- reductase inhibitors (5ARIs), which include widely used drugs for male pattern baldness, such as Propecia, and Proscar, used to fight an enlarged prostate gland. Researchers led by Dr. Blayne Welk, of Western University in Ontario, Canada, noted that "there have been concerns raised by patients and regulatory agencies regarding serious psychiatric adverse effects" in users of 5ARIs. To learn more, Welk's team tracked data on more than 93,000 Canadian men, aged 66 and older. The men had started a new prescription for a 5ARI medication between 2003 and 2013. Although the study wasn't designed to prove cause-and-effect, some psychiatric ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Major Depressive Disorder, Finasteride, Avodart, Dysthymia, Prostatitis, Propecia, Jalyn, Dutasteride, Proscar, Androgenetic Alopecia, Dutasteride/tamsulosin

Genetic Link Between Short Stature And Premature Baldness In Men

Posted 10 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 10, 2017 – Mother Nature may hit some men with a double whammy, as new research suggests genetic links between short stature and premature baldness. German scientists were able to pinpoint "63 alterations in the human genome that increase the risk of premature hair loss," explained study leader Dr. Stefanie Heilmann-Heimbach, a human geneticist at the University of Bonn. "Some of these alterations were also found in connection with other characteristics and illnesses, such as reduced body size," she said in a university news release. In its research, Heilmann-Heimbach's team analyzed the genes of about 11,000 men with premature hair loss and another 12,000 men with no hair loss. Besides the connection to short stature, the findings also confirmed a previously identified link between premature hair loss and an increased risk of prostate cancer. But there was good news, too ... Read more

Related support groups: Androgenetic Alopecia, Diagnosis and Investigation

Geneticists Get to the Roots of Hair Loss in Men

Posted 14 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 14, 2017 – Gene research may offer a glimmer of hope for men challenged by that bane of aging – male-pattern baldness. In the largest such study to date, a Scottish research team said it has identified close to 300 genetic regions tied to baldness. Previously, only a handful had been identified, the scientists said. The University of Edinburgh researchers stressed that their findings don't mean a cure for shiny pates is coming tomorrow. "However, these results take us one step closer," said study principal author Dr. Ricardo Marioni. He spoke in a news release from the journal PLOS Genetics, which published the findings Feb. 14. Marioni, who's with the university's Center for Genomic and Experimental Medicine, believes "the findings pave the way for an improved understanding of the genetic causes of hair loss." In this study, the research team analyzed genetic data from ... Read more

Related support groups: Finasteride, Minoxidil, Rogaine, Dandruff, Propecia, Proscar, Androgenetic Alopecia, Rogaine Extra Strength, Rogaine Women's, Ronoxidil, Loniten

Health Tip: Coping With Hair Loss

Posted 10 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

-- If you're losing your hair, you may be able to slow the tide. The American Academy of Dermatology suggests: Use caution in washing, drying and styling your hair. Certain medications can trigger hair loss. Don't stop taking any medication. Instead, talk to your dermatologist about whether there are alternatives. Hair loss can be temporary. Factors such as just having given birth, illness or stress may be at play. Speak to your doctor about this possibility. Read more

Related support groups: Alopecia, Androgenetic Alopecia

'Uncombable' Hair? Maybe Genes Are to Blame

Posted 23 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 23, 2016 – It's not common, but some children have ultra-frizzy hair that can't be combed normally. Now researchers say they've found genes linked to what's known as "uncombable hair syndrome." "From the [genetic] mutations found, a huge amount can be learned about the mechanisms involved in forming healthy hair, and why disorders sometimes occur," said study co-author Regina Betz. She is a professor with the Institute for Human Genetics at the University of Bonn in Germany. "At the same time, we can now secure the clinical diagnosis of 'uncombable hair' with molecular genetic methods," she said in a university news release. Uncombable hair syndrome is relatively rare. There have only been about 100 documented cases over the past several decades, the researchers said. Some families are especially affected. "However, we assume that there are many more people affected," Betz ... Read more

Related support groups: Alopecia, Androgenetic Alopecia, Diagnosis and Investigation

Health Tip: Keep Hair Looking Healthy

Posted 16 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Hair treatments designed to improve your appearance may actually be damaging your coiffure. The American Academy of Dermatology suggests these healthy hair tips: If possible, use color that's no more than three shades different than your natural hair color. Always test at-home color before using it on all of your hair, checking for rash or irritation. Wear a hat with a wide brim to protect your hair from the sun. If you perm your hair, always follow the instructions. Set a timer to make sure you wash out the perm solution promptly. See a dermatologist if the perm solution causes severe burning or stinging. Read more

Related support groups: Alopecia, Dandruff, Androgenetic Alopecia

Survey Says: Hair Transplants Make Men Look Younger

Posted 25 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 25, 2016 – Bad news for the follicularly challenged: A new survey confirms that balding men are seen by others as older and less good-looking. But when the same men got a hair transplant, observers thought of them as younger and more attractive, the study found. The transplant recipients were also rated as more "successful, and approachable than their pre-transplant counterparts by casual observers," said a team led by Dr. Lisa Ishii. She works in the division of facial plastic and reconstructive surgery at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore. One expert in male age-related hair loss wasn't surprised by the findings. "This study further validates what we have known for some time; we know that most men feel more attractive when they have more hair, and it seems the observers in this study tended to agree," said Dr. Katy Burris. She is a dermatologist ... Read more

Related support groups: Alopecia, Androgenetic Alopecia

Health Tip: Losing Hair After Pregnancy

Posted 24 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Hormonal changes cause some new moms to lose hair after pregnancy. But there are things women can do to help their hair look fuller. The American Academy of Dermatology suggests: Shampooing with a volumizing product. Skipping conditioning shampoos, which add weight to hair. Opting for a lighter conditioner that's designed for fine hair. Apply it only on the ends of the hair and avoid the scalp. Read more

Related support groups: Alopecia, Delivery, Androgenetic Alopecia, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Health Tip: Losing Your Hair?

Posted 23 May 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Baldness, once thought to be a male-only condition, also affects women. Want to know more? Here's some background information, courtesy of the American Academy of Dermatology: Hair care practices can worsen hair loss. Avoid activities that can damage hair, such as blow drying on the highest heat setting. Temporary factors such as childbirth, stress and illness can trigger hair loss, but this type of loss typically stops over time. Talk to your doctor about your medications, and any that may contribute to hair loss. Never stop taking a medication without discussing with your doctor. Read more

Related support groups: Alopecia, Dandruff, Androgenetic Alopecia

Today's Hair Style Could Cause Tomorrow's Hair Loss

Posted 29 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, April 29, 2016 – Black women who like to wear their hair pulled back tightly may be increasing their risk of hair loss, new research suggests. A team of researchers from Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore reviewed 19 studies and found a "strong association" between scalp-pulling hair styles and traction alopecia, which is gradual hair loss from damage to the hair follicle from tension at the hair root. Traction alopecia is the most common type of hair loss among black American women, affecting about one out of three, the researchers said. The study did not prove a definitive cause-and-effect connection. But, styles linked with this type of hair loss include braids, tight ponytails, dreadlocks, weaves and extensions, especially if hair has been chemically straightened, the review said. "Hair is a cornerstone of self-esteem and identity for many people but ironically, ... Read more

Related support groups: Alopecia, Dandruff, Androgenetic Alopecia

Black Women's Hair Styling Choices Can Cause Hair Loss

Posted 4 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 4, 2016 – Hair styling practices may be causing black women to experience hair loss, which is a major problem that often goes undiagnosed, a new survey finds. While genetics may play a key role in hair loss among black women, styling practices such as braiding, weaves and chemical relaxing may also increase their risk of hair loss, said dermatologist Dr. Yolanda Lenzy, a clinical associate professor at the University of Connecticut in Farmington. She joined with the Black Women's Health Study at Boston University's Slone Epidemiology Center to survey nearly 5,600 black women about their experiences with hair loss. Almost 48 percent said they had suffered hair loss on the crown or top of the scalp. "When hair loss is caused by styling practices, the problem is usually chronic use. Women who use these styling practices tend to use them repeatedly, and long-term repeated use ... Read more

Related support groups: Alopecia, Dandruff, Androgenetic Alopecia

Male Pattern Baldness Tied to Prostate Cancer, Study Suggests

Posted 15 Sep 2014 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Sept. 15, 2014 – Men with male pattern baldness may face a higher risk of developing an aggressive type of prostate cancer than men with no balding, a new study suggests. But, the study authors noted that it's not clear yet whether men with this specific pattern of baldness should be concerned. Their study only found an association between male pattern baldness and aggressive prostate cancer. It did not prove cause and effect. "It is conceivable that, in the future, male pattern baldness may play a small role in estimating risk of prostate cancer and may contribute to discussions between doctors and patients about prostate cancer screening," said study co-author Michael Cook. Cook is an investigator with the division of cancer epidemiology and genetics at the U.S. National Cancer Institute. The study is published in the Sept. 15 issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Male ... Read more

Related support groups: Prostate Cancer, Alopecia, Androgenetic Alopecia

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