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Related terms: Anaphylactic Reaction, Anaphylactic Shock, Shock, Anaphylactic

Health Tip: Could Allergy Shots Help You?

Posted 4 days ago by Drugs.com

-- If you have allergies, regular shots (immunotherapy) are designed to make you less sensitive to allergens over time. The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology says you may be a candidate for allergy shots if: Your symptoms are moderate-to-severe and your allergy season lasts a few months or more. You want to avoid long-term use of allergy medications. You can commit the time needed for getting regular allergy shots. You can afford the cost of allergy shots and related medical visits. Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Zyrtec, Hydroxyzine, Promethazine, Claritin, Allegra, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Allergic Rhinitis, Phenergan, Cetirizine, Hay Fever, Vistaril, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Periactin, Chlorpheniramine

Immunotherapy Not a Quick Fix for Hay Fever

Posted 10 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 14, 2017 – Immunotherapy – often in the form of allergy shots – can combat the runny nose, itchy eyes, congestion, sneezing and sinus pressure of persistent hay fever. But it can't be done in less than three years, British researchers report. Two years of immunotherapy was only as effective as a placebo, the study authors said. The key, the researchers added, seems to be a third year of treatment. "Immunotherapy for hay fever [allergic rhinitis] involves receiving a high dose of grass pollen vaccine either as a monthly injection or as a daily pill placed under the tongue," said lead researcher Dr. Stephen Durham. He is a professor of allergy and respiratory medicine at Imperial College London in England. About 15 percent of Americans suffer from diagnosed hay fever, and 30 percent report having symptoms of hay fever, which can negatively affect quality of life and ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Zyrtec, Hydroxyzine, Promethazine, Claritin, Loratadine, Allegra, Diphenhydramine, Allergic Rhinitis, Phenergan, Cetirizine, Hay Fever, Vistaril, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Flonase, Fexofenadine, Nasonex

Needed: An 'Action Plan' for Kids Prone to Severe Allergic Reactions

Posted 12 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 13, 2017 – When kids are at risk of severe allergic reactions, all their caregivers should have a written action plan and epinephrine auto-injectors readily available, according to new reports from the American Academy of Pediatrics. The reports include a new "universal" action plan for doctors to give parents, to help ensure they're ready to manage a life-threatening reaction called anaphylaxis. Anaphylaxis is a sudden, severe allergic reaction that affects multiple organs in the body. The symptoms include swelling of the throat, lips and tongue; trouble breathing and swallowing; chest tightness; vomiting, and hives or skin rash. It's an emergency and needs to be quickly treated with an auto-injection of epinephrine, said Dr. Scott Sicherer. He's a professor of pediatrics, allergy and immunology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City. Sicherer ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Angioedema, Epinephrine, Anaphylaxis, EpiPen, Adrenalin, Primatene Mist, Septocaine, EpiPen 2-Pak, Articaine/Epinephrine, EpiPen Jr, Bupivacaine/Epinephrine, Epinephrine/Lidocaine, Primatene Mist Inhaler, Zorcaine, E-Pilo-1, Medihaler-Epi, Epinephrine/Prilocaine, Ana-Kit

Think You're Allergic to Penicillin? Check Again

Posted 18 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 6, 2017 – Many people who think they're allergic to penicillin don't really have an allergy to this antibiotic, a pediatric expert says. And anyone who thinks they have had an allergic reaction to penicillin should undergo an allergy test to ensure they really need to avoid these important drugs, Dr. Min Lee advised. She is a pediatric allergist at UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. "Penicillins are some of the safest and cheapest antibiotics available, and people who are reported to be allergic often get antibiotics that are costlier and potentially more toxic," Lee said in a news release from the medical center. According to UT Southwestern researchers, 90 percent of people who have a penicillin allergy listed in their medical records didn't actually have a reaction when exposed to the medication during an allergy test. Doctors can test for a penicillin allergy in ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Epinephrine, Anaphylaxis, EpiPen, Clostridial Infection, Nasal Polyps, Adrenalin, Primatene Mist, Septocaine, EpiPen 2-Pak, Epinephrine/Lidocaine, Prevention of Clostridium Difficile Infection Recurrence, Articaine/Epinephrine, EpiPen Jr, Bupivacaine/Epinephrine, Primatene Mist Inhaler, Orabloc

CVS Cuts Price of Generic Competitor to EpiPen

Posted 12 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

A generic competitor to Mylan's EpiPen is now available at CVS for about one-sixth the price. CVS will charge $109.99 for a two-pack of the generic version of Adrenaclick, a lesser-known treatment than EpiPen, which can cost more than $600, the Associated Press reported. The products are auto-injectors that contain the hormone epinephrine and provide emergency treatment for potentially deadly allergic reactions to foods such as nuts and eggs and to insect bites and stings. The drug store chain said it cut the price of the generic version of Adrenaclick nearly in half and that the lower price is available in all its stores. The new price applies to both insured patients and those who pay cash without coverage, and is what customers will pay at the pharmacy counter, the AP reported. Mylan has faced severe criticism for increasing the price of its EpiPen by more than 500 percent since ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Epinephrine, Anaphylaxis, EpiPen, Adrenalin, Primatene Mist, Septocaine, EpiPen 2-Pak, Bupivacaine/Epinephrine, Epinephrine/Lidocaine, Articaine/Epinephrine, EpiPen Jr, Primatene Mist Inhaler, Lets Kit, E-Pilo-1, Medihaler-Epi, Adrenaclick, Ana-Kit, EpiPen Auto-Injector

New Guidelines Urge Early Intro to Peanut Products in High-Risk Infants

Posted 5 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 5, 2017 – Babies at increased risk for peanut allergy should have peanut-containing foods added to their diets as early as 4 months of age, new U.S. guidelines suggest. The recommendation comes from the U.S. National Institutes of Health and other expert groups. And it advocates a tactic that might seem counterintuitive: To drastically cut the chances of peanut allergy in high-risk babies, parents should introduce "age-appropriate" forms of peanut products early in life. Researchers said the advice is based on a pivotal clinical trial called LEAP, funded by the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, and first published in 2015. That study turned old thinking about peanut allergies on its head. At one time, doctors recommended complete peanut avoidance for babies and young children at high risk of an allergic reaction. That advice, however, didn't ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Claritin, Allegra, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Allergic Rhinitis, Phenergan, Cetirizine, Hay Fever, Vistaril, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Periactin, Chlorpheniramine

Food Allergies Among Kids Vary by Race: Study

Posted 22 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 22, 2016 – Black and Hispanic children are much more likely to have corn, shellfish and fish allergies than white children, according to a U.S. study. The study also found that compared to whites, black children have much higher rates of asthma, eczema and allergies to wheat and soy. The results, from the study of 817 children who were diagnosed with food allergies from birth to age 18, show that race and ethnicity are important factors in how people are affected by food allergies, according to the researchers. "Food allergy is a prevalent condition in the U.S., but little is known about its characteristics and severity in racial minority groups," said study lead author Dr. Mahboobeh Mahdavinia, an allergy and immunology expert at Rush University in Chicago. "Our goal was to characterize the food allergy-related outcomes in these children and to identify any disparities ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Asthma, Eczema, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Anaphylaxis, Allergic Asthma, Reversible Airways Disease, Serum Sickness

Colleges Not Fully Prepared for Students With Food Allergies: Study

Posted 12 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 11, 2016 – Most colleges don't have comprehensive programs to support students with food allergies, putting them at risk for life-threatening allergic reactions, according to a new study. "Our study found that while many colleges offer support for students with food allergy in the dining hall, the same support doesn't carry over to organized sports, dormitories or social events" said lead author Dr. Ruchi Gupta, an associate professor of pediatrics at Northwestern University. "That leaves students feeling vulnerable and scrambling to inform all the various departments of their needs," she added in a news release from the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI). The study also found that students with food allergies are willing to help educate others on campus about food allergies. "Parents tell us they need to educate everyone, literally everyone – ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Anaphylaxis, Oral Allergy Syndrome

How to Introduce Your Baby to Food Containing Peanuts

Posted 11 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 11, 2016 – For parents who are unsure when and how to introduce their babies to food containing peanuts, new guidelines are on the way. The guidelines – coming soon from the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) – are to be presented Friday at the ACAAI's annual meeting in San Francisco. "The first step is determining if your child is at high-risk for peanut allergy," guideline co-author Dr. Amal Assa'ad said in a college news release. "Before introducing peanut-containing foods to a high-risk infant, the infant should be seen by their primary health care provider who will determine if referral to an allergist for testing and/or in-office introduction is needed," said Assa'ad, chair of the ACAAI Food Allergy Committee. Infants with severe eczema and/or an egg allergy are at high risk for peanut allergy, according to the guidelines. Parents are ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Eczema, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Anaphylaxis, Oral Allergy Syndrome

Food Labels on Potential Allergens May Confuse Shoppers

Posted 1 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 1, 2016 – Shoppers are often confused by food labels that warn of potential allergens, and the consequences can be serious, new research suggests. "Up to 40 percent of consumers who either themselves have a food allergy or a child with a food allergy are purchasing products with precautionary allergen labels," said lead researcher Dr. Ruchi Gupta. She is a pediatrician at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago. The most misunderstood food labels, the researchers found, are those that say "may contain" or "manufactured on shared equipment." While those labels may sound like the foods aren't as dangerous as those that say a product definitely contains a particular allergen, that's not the case, Gupta stressed. Gupta and her colleagues conducted an online survey of more than 6,600 respondents in the United States and Canada. Those answering the questions either ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Zyrtec, Hydroxyzine, Promethazine, Claritin, Allegra, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Allergic Rhinitis, Phenergan, Cetirizine, Hay Fever, Vistaril, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Periactin, Chlorpheniramine

Be Allergy Aware: Join the Teal Pumpkin Project on Halloween

Posted 28 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 28, 2016 – Halloween can be ver-r-r-r-y frightful for kids with food allergies, but the Teal Pumpkin Project aims to make their trick-or-treating safer and more fun. The initiative from Food Allergy Research & Education (FARE) asks people to offer non-food treats at Halloween, and to place a teal pumpkin or sign in view to let trick-or-treaters know such treats are available. You can paint a pumpkin teal or get a teal pumpkin at a craft shop or drug store. A free sign is available at FARE's website. One child in 13 in the United States has a potentially life-threatening food allergy, according to FARE. "This year in particular, more people are becoming aware of how life-altering a food allergy diagnosis can be, and how difficult it can be to manage this potentially life-threatening medical condition," said Lois Witkop, FARE's chief advancement officer. "We hope that ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Anaphylaxis

Skin Patch May Help With Peanut Allergy

Posted 28 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 28, 2016 – A skin patch that delivers small amounts of peanut protein may help treat children and young adults with peanut allergy, researchers report. The new approach "looks promising and has potential," said study author Dr. Marshall Plaut. He is chief of the food allergy, atopic dermatitis and allergic mechanisms section at the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Plaut's research team worked with 74 children and young adults, aged 4 to 25, who are allergic to peanuts. The volunteers were randomly assigned to wear either a high-dose patch (250 micrograms), a low-dose patch (100 micrograms) or a placebo patch. Participants put a new patch on daily, sticking it to their arm or between their shoulder blades. At the one-year mark, the researchers evaluated whether the participants were able to consume at least 10 times more peanut protein than they ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Anaphylaxis

Health Tip: Health Tip: Manage Allergies

Posted 20 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

-- If pets make you sniffle, sneeze, itch and cough, there are things you can do that don't include getting rid of Fido or Fluffy. The American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology recommends: Limiting how much time you spend around your pet. Taking nasal spray, an antihistamine or bronchodilator, as directed by your allergist. Talking to your doctor about allergy shots. Don't let the pet into your bedroom. Always wash your hands immediately after touching your pet. Give the pet a bath once weekly. Use a high-efficiency vacuum or HEPA air filter at home. Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Zyrtec, Hydroxyzine, Promethazine, Claritin, Loratadine, Allegra, Diphenhydramine, Allergic Rhinitis, Phenergan, Cetirizine, Hay Fever, Vistaril, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Flonase, Fexofenadine, Nasonex

Parents of Kids With Food Allergies Believe They're Allergic, Too

Posted 12 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 – Many parents of children with food allergies mistakenly believe they are allergic, too, a new study finds. The study included parents who said they, like their kids, had food allergies. But fewer than one-third of the parents tested positive for food allergies. The study was published Oct. 12 in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. "Either people haven't been tested and are assuming an allergy from a previous reaction to a food, or they haven't been tested properly and may not truly have an allergy. Allergy testing, including blood and skin prick testing, is not always reliable," co-lead author Dr. Melanie Makhija said in a journal news release. The study included nearly 2,500 parents whose children had food allergies. Of these, almost 14 percent of parents said they themselves had a food allergy. But when those parents were tested, researchers found ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Zyrtec, Hydroxyzine, Promethazine, Claritin, Allegra, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Allergic Rhinitis, Phenergan, Cetirizine, Hay Fever, Vistaril, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Periactin, Chlorpheniramine

6 Keys to a Safe, Allergy-Free Halloween

Posted 10 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 – Halloween can be really scary for kids with asthma and allergies – and for their parents – unless they take precautions, an allergist advises. "Keep certain common sense tips in mind as you prepare for the holiday," said Bryan Martin, president of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI). "A little preparation can ensure your little ones don't suffer from allergic reactions or asthma attacks," Martin said in an ACAAI news release. To help parents prepare, he offered these six tips: Masks can be scary. For kids with asthma, try to choose a costume that doesn't require a mask. If a child insists on one, it should not be tight-fitting or obstruct breathing. Halloween makeup sometimes causes allergic reactions. Use only high-quality, hypoallergenic makeup, and test it on a small patch of skin in advance to see if it triggers a reaction. Skip ... Read more

Related support groups: Skin Rash, Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Claritin, Loratadine, Allegra, Diphenhydramine, Phenergan, Cetirizine, Vistaril, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Periactin, Chlorpheniramine, Xyzal

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