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Related terms: Anaphylactic Reaction, Anaphylactic Shock, Shock, Anaphylactic

How to Protect Yourself From the Seasonal Flu

Posted 2 days 2 hours ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 23, 2016 – Don't let this year's flu season catch you by surprise. Experts say an annual flu shot is the best way to avoid the aches, fever, congestion and fatigue that flu brings – and to protect those who are at high risk for flu-related complications. "Every year, people die from influenza," said Cindy Weston, an assistant professor of nursing at Texas A&M University. "After sizable outbreaks, people will respond with large amounts of vaccinations, but they should be getting vaccinated every year to protect those most vulnerable, mainly children and the elderly." Now that it's fall, it's time for your shot. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends an annual flu shot for everyone older than 6 months of age. This includes pregnant women. Babies less than 8 months old may need to get the vaccine in two doses. And people over age 65 should get the ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Influenza, Anaphylaxis, Swine Influenza, Avian Influenza, FluLaval, Influenza A, Afluria, Fluzone, FluMist, Flucelvax, Influenza Prophylaxis, Vaccination and Prophlaxis, Influenza Virus Vaccine, Inactivated, FluLaval Quadrivalent, Afluria 2015-2016, Influenza with Pneumonia, Fluvirin Preservative-Free, Fluzone Preservative-Free

Early Introduction of Eggs, Peanuts May Cut Kids' Allergy Risk: Study

Posted 5 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 20, 2016 – Introducing babies to eggs or peanuts early on may help reduce their risk of food allergies, a new analysis finds. Researchers reviewed 146 previous studies that examined when babies were given foods that often trigger reactions, as well as their risk of food allergies or autoimmune diseases. They discovered that the timing of food introduction may affect allergy risk, but they found no similar link for autoimmune disease. The researchers reported with "moderate certainty" that babies who were given eggs when they were 4 months to 6 months old had a lower egg allergy risk. And children given peanuts between 4 months and 11 months of age had a lower peanut allergy risk than those who were older. The study, published Sept. 20 in the Journal of the American Medical Association, said early introduction could head off 24 cases of egg allergy per 1,000 people and 18 ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Celiac Disease, Angioedema, Anaphylaxis, Nasal Polyps, Nasal Polyps - Prevention, Oral Allergy Syndrome

Food Allergies Linked to Raised Risk of Asthma, Hay Fever

Posted 11 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 14, 2016 – Children with food allergies are at increased risk for asthma and hay fever, and the risk rises with the number of food allergies, new research shows. The study included information on nearly 363,000 children and teens. Half of the kids were white, and 40 percent were black. Between 7 and 8 percent had one food allergy. "For patients with an established diagnosis of food allergy, 35 percent went on to develop asthma," said study senior author Dr. Jonathan Spergel. He is chief of the division of allergy and immunology at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. "Patients with multiple food allergies were at increased risk of developing asthma as compared to those with a single food allergy," he added in a hospital news release. Just over one-third of patients with food allergy went on to develop hay fever, also called allergic rhinitis, Spergel said. Those ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Asthma, Asthma - Maintenance, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Asthma - Acute, Anaphylaxis, Allergic Asthma, Reversible Airways Disease, Oral Allergy Syndrome

Health Tip: Don't Be Surprised by Fall Allergies

Posted 5 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

-- As the weather cools down and the tree leaves turn for fall, don't let allergy season catch you off guard. The American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology says that: Hay fever isn't an allergy to hay, and it's actually called allergic rhinitis. It's the term that's sometimes used to describe allergies that happen in late summer, often from ragweed pollen. Ragweed pollen is usually high from mid-August until the first hard freeze, but it varies based on where you live. Unusually warm temperatures through fall can worsen allergy symptoms. Get ahead of symptoms by taking allergy medications when the season starts and before symptoms plague you. Try not to rake leaves if you have allergies. If you must, wear a mask to limit breathing in the allergens they stir up. Remember to protect kids from allergens in school, such as chalk dust, classroom pets and food allergies. Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Anaphylaxis, Nasal Polyps, Nasal Polyps - Prevention

Mylan to Offer Generic EpiPen

Posted 29 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 29, 2016 – A cheaper generic version of the emergency allergy treatment EpiPen will be made available within the next few weeks, manufacturer Mylan said Monday. In the wake of mounting criticism over recent price hikes, the company said the generic version will be distributed by its U.S. subsidiary. It will have a list price of $300 for a two-pack, compared with $608 for the brand-name version. The generic version will be available in both 0.15 milligram (mg) and 0.30 mg strengths, the Associated Press reported. EpiPens are used to treat anaphylaxis – a severe, potentially fatal allergic reaction to insect bites and foods like nuts and eggs. The auto-injection device, which contains the hormone epinephrine, expires after a year. Since most users need several – one for home, and one for school or work, for example – the costs can mount up. With just one competitor, Mylan ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Epinephrine, Anaphylaxis, EpiPen, Adrenalin, Primatene Mist, Septocaine, EpiPen 2-Pak, Primatene Mist Inhaler, Bupivacaine/Epinephrine, Epinephrine/Lidocaine, Articaine/Epinephrine, EpiPen Jr, Lignospan Forte, E-Pilo-6, P3E1, Chlorpheniramine/Epinephrine, Orabloc, Bronitin

Patent Monopolies Driving High U.S. Drug Prices: Study

Posted 23 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 23, 2016 – Prescription drug prices are skyrocketing in the United States due in large part to government regulations, a new analysis finds. These regulations allow drug manufacturers to charge monopolistic prices that aren't opposed by competing market forces, the researchers believe. The result? For each person in the United States, $858 was spent on prescription drugs, compared with an average of $400 per person across 19 other industrialized nations. Prescription medications now comprise an estimated 17 percent of overall health care expenses, the authors of the new report said. Drug makers charge high prices for drugs thanks largely to "market exclusivity" regulations intended to allow them to recoup the research and development costs for new breakthrough medications, said senior author Ameet Sarpatwari. He's an instructor at Harvard Medical School and the Harvard ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Hepatitis C, Anaphylaxis, EpiPen, Daraprim

Congress Questioning EpiPen Price Hike

Posted 23 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

Members of Congress want the maker of EpiPens to explain why the price of the lifesaving product has risen 400 percent since 2007 and now costs as much as $600. An EpiPen delivers a potentially life-saving injection of medicine into people suffering a severe allergic reaction. In a letter to the pharmaceutical company Mylan, Senator Charles Grassley, the Iowa Republican who heads the Judiciary Committee, demanded to know the reasons for the huge price hike, The New York Times reported. "Access to epinephrine can mean the difference between life and death, especially for children," wrote Grassley, who also noted that many children who need EpiPens are enrolled in government health care programs. "It follows that many of the children who are prescribed EpiPens are covered by Medicaid, and therefore, the taxpayers are picking up the tab for this medication," he wrote. Previously, Senator ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Epinephrine, Anaphylaxis, EpiPen, Adrenalin, Primatene Mist, Septocaine, EpiPen 2-Pak, Bupivacaine/Epinephrine, Epinephrine/Lidocaine, Primatene Mist Inhaler, Articaine/Epinephrine, EpiPen Jr, Octocaine 100, E-Pilo-6, P3E1, Vivacaine, Bronitin, EpiPen JR Auto-Injector

Peanut Allergy Treatment: The Earlier in Childhood, the Better

Posted 18 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 18, 2016 – A treatment for peanut allergies may work better if it's given to children earlier, even as young as 9 months, before the body's "allergic program" fully matures, new research suggests. The treatment is called oral immunotherapy – also known as exposure therapy. In this approach, peanut-allergic children are given very tiny amounts of peanut allergen as directed by a doctor. Over time, these small amounts of the allergen are thought to lessen the body's reaction to it. "If you are peanut-allergic, treatment early in life can have a longer benefit after stopping the treatment," said study leader Dr. Wesley Burks. He's a pediatric allergist at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine. The new study included 37 children between 9 months and 36 months old. They were given either high- or low-dose peanut exposure daily for about 29 ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Epinephrine, Anaphylaxis, EpiPen, Adrenalin, Primatene Mist, Septocaine, EpiPen 2-Pak, Primatene Mist Inhaler, Bupivacaine/Epinephrine, Epinephrine/Lidocaine, Articaine/Epinephrine, EpiPen Jr, Lignospan Forte, E-Pilo-6, P3E1, Chlorpheniramine/Epinephrine, Orabloc, Bronitin

4 Ways to Protect Yourself Against Poison Ivy, Oak and Sumac

Posted 11 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 11, 2016 – When you're enjoying the great outdoors, be on the lookout for poison ivy, poison oak and poison sumac. The urushiol oil in their sap can cause itching, a red rash and blisters. These symptoms can appear from a few hours to several days after exposure, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Learn what these plants look like so you can avoid them. The old saying "Leaves of three, let it be" is a helpful reminder for poison ivy and poison oak. But it's not foolproof – the form may vary depending on the type of plant you encounter. Poison sumac, meanwhile, usually has clusters of 7 to 13 leaves, according to the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. If you're working in areas with these plants, wear long sleeves, long pants tucked into boots and impermeable gloves. Wash garden tools and gloves regularly. Wash pets if they may ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Zyrtec, Hydroxyzine, Claritin, Promethazine, Allegra, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Phenergan, Cetirizine, Vistaril, Clobetasol, Atarax, Cyproheptadine, Fluocinonide, Chlorpheniramine, Fexofenadine, Periactin

Eczema's Effects More Than Skin Deep

Posted 29 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 29, 2016 – People dealing with the itchy skin condition known as eczema may have other medical conditions to cope with as well, including heart disease, a dermatologist says. Eczema, which causes dry, red patches of skin and intense itchiness, affects an estimated one-quarter of children in the United States. And, as many as seven million adults also have eczema, Dr. Jonathan Silverberg said in an American Academy of Dermatology news release. "Although it affects the skin, eczema is not just skin-deep. This disease can have a serious impact on patients' quality of life and overall health, both physically and mentally," Silverberg said. He's assistant professor in dermatology, medical social sciences and preventive medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. Eczema has been linked to an increased risk of health conditions such as asthma, hay ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Allergic Reactions, Asthma, Heart Disease, Eczema, Dermatitis, Contact Dermatitis, Asthma - Acute, Atopic Dermatitis, Anaphylaxis, Allergic Asthma, Diagnosis and Investigation, Reversible Airways Disease

Allergies Less Common in Kids Who Suck Thumb, Bite Nails

Posted 11 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 11, 2016 – If your kid's nail-biting or thumb-sucking habit drives you nuts, you'll be happy to hear that a new study suggests those habits may have a health benefit. Children who suck their thumb or bite their nails past preschool age may be less prone to allergic reactions when they reached adolescence, researchers said. What's more, the study found that the protective effects seemed to last into adulthood. Still no one is suggesting that kids be encouraged to take up the habits, said senior researcher Dr. Robert Hancox, of the University of Otago in Dunedin, New Zealand. With thumb-sucking, in particular, there's some concern that it can interfere with the alignment of the teeth as they come in. "We don't wish to dismiss these concerns," Hancox said. "But," he added, "if a child has a habit that is difficult to break, maybe there is some consolation in the fact that ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Zyrtec, Hydroxyzine, Claritin, Promethazine, Allegra, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Phenergan, Cetirizine, Vistaril, Atarax, Cyproheptadine, Chlorpheniramine, Fexofenadine, Periactin

Health Tip: Spot Signs of Summer Allergies

Posted 6 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Think you've had a summer cold? Summer allergies might actually be to blame. Here are some warning signs of allergy, courtesy of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology: Dark circles below the eyes. Swollen adenoids that cause the face to look tired and droopy. A nasal crease, which is a line that forms on the bridge of the nose. Breathing through the mouth due to nasal congestion. Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Zyrtec, Hydroxyzine, Claritin, Promethazine, Allegra, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Phenergan, Cetirizine, Vistaril, Atarax, Cyproheptadine, Fexofenadine, Chlorpheniramine, Periactin

Asthma Symptoms Can Bloom in Springtime

Posted 29 May 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, May 27, 2016 – Asthma symptoms increase in spring, making it especially important for people with the lung disease to be aware of triggers and risk factors, an expert says. "Asthma is a lifelong disease that causes wheezing, breathlessness, chest tightness and coughing," said Dr. Linda Rogers, director of the clinical asthma program at Mount Sinai-National Jewish Health Respiratory Institute, in New York City. "While there is no cure for asthma, a personalized care plan including appropriate medications and education on triggers and proper care techniques can prevent attacks from occurring, helping patients lead a full and active life," she said in a Mount Sinai news release. An asthma attack can cause airways to swell, which constricts airflow and results in difficulty breathing. Common asthma triggers include tobacco smoke, outdoor air pollution, dust mites, pet dander, ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Asthma, Asthma - Maintenance, Asthma - Acute, Anaphylaxis, Allergic Asthma, Reversible Airways Disease - Maintenance, Reversible Airways Disease

At Least 1 Full-Time Nurse Per School, Pediatric Group Recommends

Posted 23 May 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 23, 2016 – Every school should have at least one full-time registered nurse, a new American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) policy statement says. "School nursing is one of the most effective ways to keep children healthy and in school and to prevent chronic absenteeism," Dr. Breena Welch Holmes, a lead author of the policy statement and chair of the AAP Council on School Health, said in an AAP news release. But school district policies about nurses may lack uniformity. And such policies often need updating, the AAP noted. In the past, the AAP supported having one school nurse for every 750 healthy students and one nurse for every 225 students who needed professional nursing assistance. But these ratios aren't enough to meet the health needs of today's students, the new policy says. "As student health needs became more complex, the school nursing role has expanded to include ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Seizures, Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Asthma, Diabetes, Type 1, Asthma - Maintenance, Oppositional Defiant Disorder, Seizure Prevention, Asthma - Acute, Anaphylaxis, Diabetes Mellitus, Seizure Prophylaxis, Allergic Asthma, Executive Function Disorder

Giving Certain Foods Early May Cut Allergy Risk

Posted 18 May 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 18, 2016 – Doctors have long warned parents to delay introducing certain foods to babies to decrease the risk of a potential allergic reaction, but a new study suggests that strategy probably doesn't help. The study of about 1,400 children found that when babies were given peanuts, eggs or cow's milk during their first year, they were less likely to become "sensitized" to those common allergy-causing foods. Being sensitized to a food means a child tests positive on a skin test. "That doesn't necessarily mean a food allergy as such, but it indicates the child is on that pathway," said the study's senior author, Dr. Malcolm Sears. The goal is to reduce the risk of sensitization, which also reduces the risk of allergy, said Sears, a professor in the division of respirology at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. The study's lead author, Maxwell Tran, said this ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Anaphylaxis, Allergic Purpura, Oral Allergy Syndrome

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