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Related terms: Alopecia Areata, Balding, Baldness, Baldness, female pattern, Hair Loss, Hairloss, Hair Thinning, Loss of Hair

Health Tip: Keep Hair Looking Healthy

Posted 16 days ago by Drugs.com

-- Hair treatments designed to improve your appearance may actually be damaging your coiffure. The American Academy of Dermatology suggests these healthy hair tips: If possible, use color that's no more than three shades different than your natural hair color. Always test at-home color before using it on all of your hair, checking for rash or irritation. Wear a hat with a wide brim to protect your hair from the sun. If you perm your hair, always follow the instructions. Set a timer to make sure you wash out the perm solution promptly. See a dermatologist if the perm solution causes severe burning or stinging. Read more

Related support groups: Alopecia, Dandruff, Androgenetic Alopecia

Arthritis Drug May Help With Type of Hair Loss

Posted 22 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 22, 2016 – For people who suffer from a condition that causes disfiguring hair loss, a drug used for rheumatoid arthritis might regrow their hair, a new, small study suggests. Alopecia areata is an autoimmune disease that causes patchy or complete hair loss, including on the head, body, eyebrows and eyelashes. Researchers found that more than 50 percent of 66 patients treated with the drug Xeljanz (tofacitinib citrate) saw hair regrowth in three months. "There is hope now that we will have more to tell patients than get counseling and a wig," said lead researcher Dr. Brett King, an assistant professor of dermatology at the Yale School of Medicine, in New Haven, Conn. Xeljanz appears to work by stopping the immune system's attack on hair follicles, King said. In addition, the researchers have identified genes that might predict a patient's response to treatment, he said. ... Read more

Related support groups: Rheumatoid Arthritis, Alopecia, Xeljanz, Xeljanz XR

Survey Says: Hair Transplants Make Men Look Younger

Posted 25 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 25, 2016 – Bad news for the follicularly challenged: A new survey confirms that balding men are seen by others as older and less good-looking. But when the same men got a hair transplant, observers thought of them as younger and more attractive, the study found. The transplant recipients were also rated as more "successful, and approachable than their pre-transplant counterparts by casual observers," said a team led by Dr. Lisa Ishii. She works in the division of facial plastic and reconstructive surgery at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore. One expert in male age-related hair loss wasn't surprised by the findings. "This study further validates what we have known for some time; we know that most men feel more attractive when they have more hair, and it seems the observers in this study tended to agree," said Dr. Katy Burris. She is a dermatologist ... Read more

Related support groups: Alopecia, Androgenetic Alopecia

Health Tip: Losing Hair After Pregnancy

Posted 24 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Hormonal changes cause some new moms to lose hair after pregnancy. But there are things women can do to help their hair look fuller. The American Academy of Dermatology suggests: Shampooing with a volumizing product. Skipping conditioning shampoos, which add weight to hair. Opting for a lighter conditioner that's designed for fine hair. Apply it only on the ends of the hair and avoid the scalp. Read more

Related support groups: Alopecia, Delivery, Androgenetic Alopecia, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

New Moms' Hair Loss Usually Temporary, Expert Says

Posted 17 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 17, 2016 – If you've recently had a baby and think your hair is falling out, don't despair. Many new mothers experience hair loss, but an expert says the problem is usually short-lived. "Excessive hair shedding after pregnancy is very common and caused by falling estrogen levels," said Dr. Jessica Krant, an assistant clinical professor of dermatology at SUNY Downstate Medical Center, in New York City. "It usually starts about three to four months after giving birth and peaks several weeks later. The good news is that women don't have to do anything to remedy it. By their child's first birthday or even earlier, most women see their hair return to its normal fullness," she explained in an American Academy of Dermatology news release. She offers these tips for new moms who are bothered by thinning hair: Use a thickening shampoo and avoid conditioner-shampoo combos, which ... Read more

Related support groups: Alopecia, Delivery, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Health Tip: Losing Your Hair?

Posted 23 May 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Baldness, once thought to be a male-only condition, also affects women. Want to know more? Here's some background information, courtesy of the American Academy of Dermatology: Hair care practices can worsen hair loss. Avoid activities that can damage hair, such as blow drying on the highest heat setting. Temporary factors such as childbirth, stress and illness can trigger hair loss, but this type of loss typically stops over time. Talk to your doctor about your medications, and any that may contribute to hair loss. Never stop taking a medication without discussing with your doctor. Read more

Related support groups: Alopecia, Dandruff, Androgenetic Alopecia

Today's Hair Style Could Cause Tomorrow's Hair Loss

Posted 29 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, April 29, 2016 – Black women who like to wear their hair pulled back tightly may be increasing their risk of hair loss, new research suggests. A team of researchers from Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore reviewed 19 studies and found a "strong association" between scalp-pulling hair styles and traction alopecia, which is gradual hair loss from damage to the hair follicle from tension at the hair root. Traction alopecia is the most common type of hair loss among black American women, affecting about one out of three, the researchers said. The study did not prove a definitive cause-and-effect connection. But, styles linked with this type of hair loss include braids, tight ponytails, dreadlocks, weaves and extensions, especially if hair has been chemically straightened, the review said. "Hair is a cornerstone of self-esteem and identity for many people but ironically, ... Read more

Related support groups: Alopecia, Dandruff, Androgenetic Alopecia

Could a Cellular Tweak Someday 'Switch Off' Gray Hair?

Posted 28 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, April 28, 2016 – Researchers who pinpointed two cellular signals that control skin and hair color say their findings might lead to new drugs to treat skin and hair conditions, possibly even gray hair. One skin condition where the finding could potentially lead to a treatment is vitiligo. Vitiligo is caused by the loss of skin pigmentation and causes blotchy, white patches on the skin. The findings could also lead to new treatments for gray hair and skin discoloration around scars, said the researchers, led by senior investigator Mayumi Ito. She is an associate professor of dermatology at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City. The researchers identified the two cellular signals through experiments with mice and human cells. This is thought to be the first evidence linking the molecular signals to the routine growth of cells that produce pigment (melanocytes) and provide ... Read more

Related support groups: Alopecia, Dandruff, Vitiligo, Minor Skin Irritation, Minor Skin Conditions

Black Women's Hair Styling Choices Can Cause Hair Loss

Posted 4 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 4, 2016 – Hair styling practices may be causing black women to experience hair loss, which is a major problem that often goes undiagnosed, a new survey finds. While genetics may play a key role in hair loss among black women, styling practices such as braiding, weaves and chemical relaxing may also increase their risk of hair loss, said dermatologist Dr. Yolanda Lenzy, a clinical associate professor at the University of Connecticut in Farmington. She joined with the Black Women's Health Study at Boston University's Slone Epidemiology Center to survey nearly 5,600 black women about their experiences with hair loss. Almost 48 percent said they had suffered hair loss on the crown or top of the scalp. "When hair loss is caused by styling practices, the problem is usually chronic use. Women who use these styling practices tend to use them repeatedly, and long-term repeated use ... Read more

Related support groups: Alopecia, Dandruff, Androgenetic Alopecia

Scientists Report Finding 'Gray Hair' Gene

Posted 1 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 1, 2016 – Researchers say they've pinpointed the first gene linked with gray hair. They said the discovery, culled from a genetic analysis of more than 6,000 people of mixed ancestry in Latin America, proves that genes play a role in graying hair. "We already know several genes involved in balding and hair color, but this is the first time a gene for graying has been identified in humans, as well as other genes influencing hair shape and density," said study author Kaustubh Adhikari, from University College London, in England. "It was only possible because we analyzed a diverse melting pot of people, which hasn't been done before on this scale. These findings have potential forensic and cosmetic applications as we increase our knowledge on how genes influence the way we look," he said in a college news release. The gene linked with gray hair is called IRF4. The ... Read more

Related support groups: Alopecia, Diagnosis and Investigation

Health Tip: Use Less Heat on Your Hair

Posted 2 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Curling irons and blow dryers may be damaging your hair, and experts say you should avoid them as much as possible. Here are some hair-sparing tips, courtesy of the American Academy of Dermatology: Skip the blow dryer when possible, allowing your hair to dry naturally. Use the coolest setting on your styling tool. Make sure the styling tool doesn't touch your hair for very long. Use heat-styling tools as infrequently as possible. Read more

Related support groups: Alopecia, Dandruff, Minor Skin Conditions

Health Tip: When New Moms Lose Their Hair

Posted 30 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Changes in estrogen levels can lead to loss of hair in new moms. Most women return to a full head of hair by the time baby turns one. The American Academy of Dermatology suggests how to cope with loss of hair just after birth of a cbild: Use volumizing shampoo and conditioner. Don't use a shampoos labeled as "conditioning." It can weigh down hair and make it look thinner. Choose a conditioner made for fine hair. Don't put conditioner on the scalp. Only apply it to the ends of the hair. Don't use any heavy conditioner labeled "intensive," which can weigh down thin hair. Read more

Related support groups: Alopecia

Is the 'No-Shampoo' Trend a Healthy One?

Posted 30 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 29, 2015 – A new trend in beauty is based on the idea that less is more – at least when it comes to shampooing your hair. Some people – including celebrity Kim Kardashian – have stopped shampooing their hair regularly, or even altogether, based on the belief that the detergents in shampoo strip hair of its healthy natural oils. This form of hair care has even been dubbed "no-poo." Kardashian recently revealed that she washes her hair only every five days. But is this truly healthy for your hair and scalp? That largely depends on the type of head you have, according to skin and hair experts. "It's not a one-size-fits-all situation," said Dr. Angela Lamb, director of Westside Mount Sinai Dermatology in New York City. "It all depends on your hair type. There are some hair types that would tolerate it better than others." "No-poo" proponents clean their hair and scalp with ... Read more

Related support groups: Alopecia, Dry Skin, Dermatitis, Dermatological Disorders, Dandruff

Cooling Cap to Reduce Chemo-Linked Hair Loss OK'd

Posted 9 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 9, 2015 – The Dignitana Cooling System cap has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to help prevent hair loss in women undergoing chemotherapy for breast cancer. A computer-controlled system circulates cooled liquid to the cap during chemotherapy. This is designed to constrict blood vessels in the scalp, limiting the amount of chemotherapy drugs that reach the hair follicles, the agency said in a news release. In clinical testing, more than two-thirds of women who wore the cap reported losing less than half of their hair. And the likelihood of chemotherapy drugs missing an isolated cluster of breast cancer cells in the scalp because of the cap was "extremely rare," the FDA said. But since the cap doesn't work with all chemotherapy drugs, any woman interested in using the product should speak with her doctor, the FDA advised. The most common side ... Read more

Related support groups: Provera, Depo-Provera, Breast Cancer, Lupron, Alopecia, Tamoxifen, Medroxyprogesterone, Arimidex, Femara, Lupron Depot, Anastrozole, Zoladex, Evista, Megestrol, Letrozole, Megace, Aromasin, Herceptin, Casodex, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant

Drugs Used in Cancer, Arthritis May Help Fight Hair Loss

Posted 23 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 23, 2015 – Two drugs – one approved for use in arthritis and the other approved for cancer – may also hold potential for boosting hair growth, new animal research suggests. "The ultimate potential is a very effective topical product to rub on the scalp to help with all types of hair loss," said Dr. Luis Garza, an associate professor of dermatology at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, who's familiar with the study findings. But he added, "More work needs to be done to translate these findings to a product which can be tested in a clinical trial on people." In the current study, researchers from Columbia University in New York City tested the drugs only on mice, including some with patches of human skin. If the medications work, it's not clear how much of the drugs may be needed for humans. It's also important to note that findings that look promising in animal research ... Read more

Related support groups: Rheumatoid Arthritis, Cancer, Alopecia, Xeljanz, Ruxolitinib, Diagnosis and Investigation, Jakafi, Tofacitinib

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