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5 Diet Drugs: Which Ones Work?

Posted 14 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, June 14, 2016 – Any of the prescription weight-loss drugs on the market can help obese people shed pounds, although some seem more effective than others, a new study finds. Currently, five drugs are approved in the United States for managing obesity. But little has been known about how they stack up against one another, said Dr. Siddharth Singh, the lead researcher on the new study. The findings – based on more than 29,000 people in total – show all five drugs can work. But people on certain drugs tended to be more successful, at least over one year. Specifically, people using Qsymia (phentermine-topiramate) or Victoza (liraglutide) had the highest odds of shedding at least 5 percent of their initial weight. Those taking Xenical (orlistat) had the lowest odds. However, there is no single drug that's "best" for everyone, stressed Singh, an assistant clinical professor at the ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Wellbutrin, Phentermine, Bupropion, Weight Loss, Contrave, Belviq, Wellbutrin XL, Victoza, Adipex-P, Wellbutrin SR, Qsymia, Xenical, Naltrexone, Orlistat, Saxenda, Alli, Zyban, Vivitrol, Liraglutide

Majority of Americans Wants Medicare to Cover Obesity Treatments

Posted 22 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Jan. 22, 2016 – Most Americans believe Medicare should cover approved medicines to treat obesity, a new survey shows. "Public policy and society seldom associate obesity with advanced age," James Appleby, chief executive officer of the Gerontological Society of America (GSA), said in a news release from the organization. "But recent research has shown that, for those who are over 65 and significantly overweight, the risk of mortality is far greater that it is for younger individuals with excessive body weight. The preponderance of evidence is clear: Obesity at an older age carries with it a plethora of health problems like diabetes and heart disease and the likelihood of premature death," Appleby said. More than two years ago, the American Medical Association declared obesity a disease. The GSA online poll of more than 1,000 people 18 and older found that 71 percent believe ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Phentermine, Contrave, Belviq, Adipex-P, Qsymia, Xenical, Orlistat, Saxenda, Alli, Fastin, Lorcaserin, Ionamin, T-Diet, Phentermine/topiramate, Bupropion/naltrexone, Suprenza, Teramine, Atti-Plex P, Panshape M

'Thrifty' Metabolism Might Sabotage Weight Loss Efforts

Posted 11 May 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 11, 2015 – A new study confirms what many frustrated dieters already suspect: Your metabolism might make it tougher for you to lose weight than others. "The results corroborate the idea that some people who are obese may have to work harder to lose weight due to metabolic differences," said lead author Dr. Martin Reinhardt, a postdoctoral fellow at the Phoenix Epidemiology and Clinical Research Branch of the U.S. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. "But biology is not destiny. Balanced diet and regular physical activity over a long period can be very effective for weight loss," he added in an institute news release. The small laboratory study included 12 obese men and women who underwent tests to assess their body's energy use in response to a day of fasting. This was followed by six weeks of reduced calorie intake. After accounting for factors ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Weight Loss, Xenical, Orlistat, Alli

FDA Medwatch Alert: Alli (60 mg orlistat capsules) by GlaxoSmithKline: Recall - Product Tampering

Posted 28 Mar 2014 by Drugs.com

ISSUE:  GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) Consumer Healthcare is voluntarily recalling all alli weight loss products from U.S. and Puerto Rico retailers as the company believes that some packages of the product were tampered with and may contain product that is not authentic Alli. GSK received inquiries from consumers in seven states about bottles of alli that contained tablets and capsules that were not Alli. A range of tablets and capsules of various shapes and colors were reported to be found inside bottles. Additionally, some bottles inside the outer carton were missing labels and had tamper-evident seals that were not authentic. These tampered products were purchased in retail stores. BACKGROUND: Alli is for weight loss in overweight adults, 18 years and older when used along with a reduced-calorie and low fat diet. alli is a turquoise blue capsule with a dark blue band imprinted with the text ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Orlistat, Alli

GSK reports alli® product tampering, alerts consumers to unknown product in alli® packages

Posted 26 Mar 2014 by Drugs.com

(Moon Township, PA) - March 26, 2014 — GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) is alerting consumers that some bottles of its alli® over-the-counter weight loss medication have been tampered with. Consumer safety is GSK’s primary concern. We have initiated an investigation and are working with the Food and Drug Administration. What does the tampered product look like: The outer carton may look authentic. The bottle may contain a range of tablets and capsules of various shapes and colors. The bottle may not have a label. The bottle’s tamper evident seal may not be intact, not be made of foil and/or not have the authentic alli® wording: “Sealed for your Protection.” The lot numbers and expiration dates on the bottle do not match the lot number and expiration date on the outer carton. To date, some bottles bearing the following lot numbers and expiration dates on the carton have been reported to us by consum ... Read more

Related support groups: Orlistat, Alli

When Prescription Drugs Go OTC, Ads Talk Less of Harms: Study

Posted 11 Sep 2012 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 11 – When prescription drugs become available over-the-counter, advertisements for the medications are far less likely to tell consumers about the potential harms and side effects, new research finds. The reason for it, experts say, likely has to do with which federal agency regulates the marketing materials for each type of drug. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates ads for prescription drugs, while ads for over-the-counter drugs are regulated by the U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC). The FTC has much less stringent standards than the FDA for what manufacturers have to reveal about products in their marketing materials, the researchers noted. The FDA requires prescription drug advertising to provide consumers with a "fair balance" of risks and benefits – for drug ads, that often means rattling off a lengthy list of potential side effects. The FTC, on ... Read more

Related support groups: Tylenol, Ibuprofen, Omeprazole, Acetaminophen, Advil, Zyrtec, Claritin, Prilosec, Loratadine, Xenical, Paracetamol, Motrin, Cetirizine, Orlistat, Alli, Panadol, Paracetamol Teva, Prilosec OTC, Tylenol Extra Strength, Tylenol Arthritis Caplet

Experts Assess What Works for Weight Loss

Posted 3 Oct 2011 by Drugs.com

MONDAY , Oct. 3 – Weight loss programs that focus on changing behaviors, as well as those that combine behavior changes and weight-loss medications such as orlistat (Alli, Xenical), can help people shed pounds, according to a new review. "We found behaviorally based weight loss programs are generally effective for weight loss," said Dr. Erin LeBlanc, an investigator for Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research in Portland, Ore. LeBlanc declined to mention particular behavioral intervention programs by name. However, components of commercial programs such as Weight Watchers, Jenny Craig and others include group support, encouragement of physical activity, setting of goals and other strategies. The study is published in the Oct. 4 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine. LeBlanc and her colleagues were asked by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) – a federal government ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Xenical, Orlistat, Alli

Weight-Loss Drugs Alli and Xenical Should Be Removed from the Market, Public Citizen Tells FDA

Posted 15 Apr 2011 by Drugs.com

From Targeted News Service (April 14, 2011) WASHINGTON, April 14 – Public Citizen issued the following news release: The over-the-counter weight-loss drug Alli and its prescription form Xenical should be removed from the market immediately because they not only can damage the liver, but also, based on new information obtained from FDA adverse reaction files, have been associated with 47 cases of acute pancreatitis and 73 cases of kidney stones, Public Citizen said today in a petition to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Both drugs are forms of orlistat; Xenical has 120 milligrams (mgs) and Alli has 60 mgs. Their serious risks greatly outweigh their benefits, which are questionable, because neither has been shown to be much more effective than diet and exercise. "Any one of these serious risks alone would be sufficient basis for banning Xenical and Alli," said Dr. Sidney Wolfe, ... Read more

Related support groups: Xenical, Orlistat, Alli

Rare Cases of Liver Damage Tied to Weight-Loss Drug

Posted 27 May 2010 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 26 – Responding to reports of rare but sometimes severe cases of liver damage, U.S. health officials on Wednesday announced revised labels for a widely used weight-loss drug. The drug, orlistat, is available by prescription under the trade name Xenical and over-the-counter as Alli. Thirteen cases of severe liver injury have been associated with taking orlistat, 12 of them overseas and one of them, from Alli, in the United States, according to a statement from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Still, given that some 40 million people worldwide are taking the drug, according to FDA estimates, consumers needn't be too worried about the risk, said Dr. Eugene Schiff, director of the Center for Liver Diseases at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. "The issue here is that they are identifying cases, not many, but some cases of severe liver injury," he said. ... Read more

Related support groups: Xenical, Orlistat, Alli

FDA Investigating Weight-Loss Drug Over Reports of Liver Damage

Posted 12 Jan 2010 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 25 – As U.S. health officials announced Monday that they are investigating the weight-loss drug orlistat for possible incidents of liver damage, experts noted the drug might not even work well enough to warrant such potential risks. Orlistat is available in the United States, both as a prescription product (Xenical) and as an over-the-counter medication (Alli). Depending on the findings from the investigation, this could dramatically change the risk-benefit ratio of taking the drug, experts noted. The weight loss gleaned from the drug is quite modest, about 5 kilograms, said Dr. Timothy Pfanner, an assistant professor of internal medicine at the Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine and a gastroenterologist with Scott & White, in Temple, Texas. "It's not a really effective drug. The benefit is not so great to begin with," he said, and additional risks might ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Xenical, Orlistat, Alli

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