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Allergy Med Might Also Fight MS-Linked Eye Damage

Posted 12 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 12, 2016 – An over-the-counter antihistamine used to fight allergies may have an important new role: reversing the vision loss sometimes caused by multiple sclerosis. That's the finding from preliminary research that found that clemastine fumarate partially reversed optic neuropathy in people with MS. Optic neuropathy is damage to the nerve that relays information from the eye to the brain. The study is to be presented April 19 at the American Academy of Neurology's annual meeting in Vancouver. "While the improvement in vision appears modest, this study is promising because it is the first time a drug has been shown to possibly reverse the damage done by MS," said study author Dr. Ari Green, assistant clinical director of the Multiple Sclerosis Center at the University of California, San Francisco. The study was small, involving only 50 people averaging 40 years of age. ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Multiple Sclerosis, Tavist-D, Tavist, Optic Neuritis, Visual Defect/Disturbance, Clemastine, Dailyhist-1, Tavist Allergy/Sinus/Headache, Dayhist-D, Acetaminophen/Clemastine/Pseudoephedrine, Tavist Allergy, Allerhist-1, Clemastine/Phenylpropanolamine, Contac 12 Hour Allergy, Leader Allerhist, Dayhist-1, Dayhist Allergy, Tavist-1

Medication Errors Occur Every 8 Minutes in U.S. Children

Posted 20 Oct 2014 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 20, 2014 – A child receives the wrong medication or the wrong dosage every eight minutes in the United States, according to a recent study. Nearly 700,000 children under 6 years old experienced an out-of-hospital medication error between 2002 and 2012. Out of those episodes, one out of four children was under a year old. As the age of children decreased, the likelihood of an error increased, the study found. Though 94 percent of the mistakes didn't require medical treatment, the errors led to 25 deaths and about 1,900 critical care admissions, according to the study. "Even the most conscientious parents make errors," said lead author Dr. Huiyun Xiang, director of the Center for Pediatric Trauma Research at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio. That conscientiousness may even lead to one of the most common errors: Just over a quarter of these mistakes involved a ... Read more

Related support groups: Xanax, Klonopin, Clonazepam, Seroquel, Ativan, Valium, Abilify, Lorazepam, Alprazolam, Azithromycin, Diazepam, Soma, Benadryl, Flexeril, Latuda, Cyclobenzaprine, Baclofen, Zyprexa, Hydroxyzine, Risperdal

Know What's in Your Child's Medications, FDA Warns

Posted 17 Mar 2013 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, March 17 – It's the time of year when cold season and allergy season overlap, and parents need to know the active ingredients in the medicines they give their children for these conditions, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns. Taking more than one medicine at a time could cause serious health problems if the drugs have the same active ingredient, which is the component that makes the medicine effective against a particular condition. For over-the-counter products, active ingredients are listed first on a medicine's Drug Facts label. For prescription medicines, active ingredients are listed in a patient package insert or consumer information sheet provided by the pharmacist, the FDA said. Many medicines have just one active ingredient. But combination medicines – such as those for allergy, cough or fever and congestion – may have more than one. Antihistamine is an ... Read more

Related support groups: Vicodin, Norco, Lortab, Tylenol, Ibuprofen, Benadryl, Acetaminophen, Advil, Zyrtec, Sta-D, Claritin, Allegra, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Pseudoephedrine, Paracetamol, Fioricet, Motrin, Excedrin, Cetirizine

Limit Cold Medications During Pregnancy, Experts Advise

Posted 21 Dec 2011 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 21 – It's prudent to limit the use of over-the-counter cold and flu medications during pregnancy, experts say. This is because some medications may contain substances that are potentially harmful to developing fetuses, or that have not been well-studied for use in pregnant women. "Every year around this time, we get a significant number of calls from pregnant and breast-feeding women in California who are battling colds and are worried about which meds they can and can't take," said Christina Chambers, professor of pediatrics at University of California, San Diego and program director at the California Teratogen Information Service. To help expectant mothers who are sick this holiday season, Chambers offered these cold medicine safety tips: Take as little as possible. Over-the-counter cold remedies could contain up to six ingredients for a wide array of symptoms, such ... Read more

Related support groups: Cold Symptoms, NyQuil, Cheratussin AC, Mucinex DM, Claritin-D, Mucinex D, DayQuil, Hydromet, Allegra-D, Bromfed, Tussionex Pennkinetic, Bromfed DM, Coricidin, C-Phen DM, Tylenol Cold, Statuss, Advil Cold and Sinus, Lodrane, Promethazine DM, Tussin DM

Health Tip: Alcohol Can Interact With Medications

Posted 25 Oct 2011 by Drugs.com

-- Over-the-counter medications may seem safer because they don't require a prescription. But they can still interact badly when alcohol enters the mix. The American Academy of Family Physicians mentions these popular medications that may have adverse effects if mixed with alcohol: NSAID pain relievers, which may lead to gastrointestinal bleeding if taken while consuming as few as two alcoholic drink per week. Acetaminophen, which may cause liver damage when taken with alcohol. Some OTC antihistamines can make you drowsy when taken with alcohol. Decongestants and cough medications that contain the cough suppressant dextromethorphan can increase drowsiness when taken with alcohol. Herbal supplements, such as kava kava, St. John's wort or valerian root, may increase drowsiness if taken with alcohol. Read more

Related support groups: Hydrocodone, Percocet, Vicodin, Norco, Codeine, Lortab, Tylenol, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Meloxicam, Benadryl, Acetaminophen, Diclofenac, Advil, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Voltaren, Aleve, Promethazine, Claritin

Parents Still Giving Cough, Cold Meds to Kids Under 2: Poll

Posted 16 Feb 2011 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 16 – Many American parents of children aged 2 and younger still give over-the-counter cough and cold medicines to their kids despite U.S. Food and Drug Administration warnings to the contrary, researchers have found. In response to research linking over-the-counter (or OTC) cough and cold medicines to poisoning or death in hundreds of children ages 2 years and younger, the FDA said in 2008 that the products should not be given to children in this age group. In addition, studies have shown that these medicines have little benefit in controlling symptoms. A new national poll of over 300 parents of children ages 6 months to 2 years found that 61 percent of parents gave OTC cough and cold medicines to their children within the last 12 months. In addition, more than half of the parents said their child's doctor said the medicines are safe for children under 2 years, and ... Read more

Related support groups: Cold Symptoms, NyQuil, Cheratussin AC, Mucinex DM, Claritin-D, Mucinex D, DayQuil, Hydromet, Allegra-D, Bromfed, Tussionex Pennkinetic, Bromfed DM, Coricidin, C-Phen DM, Tylenol Cold, Statuss, Advil Cold and Sinus, Lodrane, Promethazine DM, Tussin DM

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