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Most Cow's Milk Baby Formulas Don't Up Risk of Type 1 Diabetes

Posted 4 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 19, 2017 – Although breast milk is still considered the best nutrition for babies, a new study suggests that most cow's milk formulas don't increase the risk of developing type 1 diabetes. However, the German researchers who did the study did find that giving highly hydrolyzed formulas – sometimes recommended for babies with food allergies – in the first week of life may increase the chances of type 1 diabetes in some children. "There is no benefit for infants at increased genetic risk for type 1 diabetes to be fed hydrolyzed infant formula as a first formula if breast-feeding is not possible," said lead author Sandra Hummel, from the Institute of Diabetes Research in Munich. The study wasn't designed to prove a cause-and-effect relationship between cow's milk baby formula and the development of autoantibodies that can trigger type 1 diabetes. And it's important to ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Diabetes, Type 1, Delivery, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Cesarean Section, Lactation Augmentation, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

CVS Cuts Price of Generic Competitor to EpiPen

Posted 11 days ago by Drugs.com

A generic competitor to Mylan's EpiPen is now available at CVS for about one-sixth the price. CVS will charge $109.99 for a two-pack of the generic version of Adrenaclick, a lesser-known treatment than EpiPen, which can cost more than $600, the Associated Press reported. The products are auto-injectors that contain the hormone epinephrine and provide emergency treatment for potentially deadly allergic reactions to foods such as nuts and eggs and to insect bites and stings. The drug store chain said it cut the price of the generic version of Adrenaclick nearly in half and that the lower price is available in all its stores. The new price applies to both insured patients and those who pay cash without coverage, and is what customers will pay at the pharmacy counter, the AP reported. Mylan has faced severe criticism for increasing the price of its EpiPen by more than 500 percent since ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Epinephrine, Anaphylaxis, EpiPen, Adrenalin, Primatene Mist, Septocaine, EpiPen 2-Pak, Primatene Mist Inhaler, Bupivacaine/Epinephrine, Epinephrine/Lidocaine, Articaine/Epinephrine, EpiPen Jr, Epinephrine/lidocaine/tetracaine, Citanest Forte, Glaucon, Epinephrine/Pilocarpine, Adrenalin, Topical, Medihaler-Epi

The Etiquette of Ahhhchoo!

Posted 12 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 11, 2017 – Sneezing is your body's way of getting rid of nasal invaders like pollen, pet hair or viruses. But while sneezes may be good for you, they can spread germs to others. Texas A&M University Health Science Center researchers offer some suggestions about protecting yourself and everyone else during the sneezing season: Look at the big picture. Be aware that the germs in a sneeze can travel far, potentially more than 10 feet, to land on surfaces where they can live for weeks. Antibacterial wipes can help reduce the risk that you'll touch germs when you make your way around the world each day. Hand hygiene helps. If you cover your sneeze with your hands, make sure to wash them afterward using soap and warm water for at least 30 seconds. Hand sanitizer isn't enough on its own. Otherwise, the germs may take up residence in your hands and spread to other people ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Influenza, Benadryl, Zyrtec, Hydroxyzine, Promethazine, Claritin, Allegra, Loratadine, Cold Symptoms, Diphenhydramine, Allergic Rhinitis, Phenergan, Hay Fever, Cetirizine, Vistaril, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Flonase

New Guidelines Urge Early Intro to Peanut Products in High-Risk Infants

Posted 18 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 5, 2017 – Babies at increased risk for peanut allergy should have peanut-containing foods added to their diets as early as 4 months of age, new U.S. guidelines suggest. The recommendation comes from the U.S. National Institutes of Health and other expert groups. And it advocates a tactic that might seem counterintuitive: To drastically cut the chances of peanut allergy in high-risk babies, parents should introduce "age-appropriate" forms of peanut products early in life. Researchers said the advice is based on a pivotal clinical trial called LEAP, funded by the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, and first published in 2015. That study turned old thinking about peanut allergies on its head. At one time, doctors recommended complete peanut avoidance for babies and young children at high risk of an allergic reaction. That advice, however, didn't ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Zyrtec, Hydroxyzine, Promethazine, Claritin, Allegra, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Allergic Rhinitis, Phenergan, Hay Fever, Cetirizine, Vistaril, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Periactin, Chlorpheniramine

Food Allergies Among Kids Vary by Race: Study

Posted 22 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 22, 2016 – Black and Hispanic children are much more likely to have corn, shellfish and fish allergies than white children, according to a U.S. study. The study also found that compared to whites, black children have much higher rates of asthma, eczema and allergies to wheat and soy. The results, from the study of 817 children who were diagnosed with food allergies from birth to age 18, show that race and ethnicity are important factors in how people are affected by food allergies, according to the researchers. "Food allergy is a prevalent condition in the U.S., but little is known about its characteristics and severity in racial minority groups," said study lead author Dr. Mahboobeh Mahdavinia, an allergy and immunology expert at Rush University in Chicago. "Our goal was to characterize the food allergy-related outcomes in these children and to identify any disparities ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Asthma, Eczema, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Anaphylaxis, Allergic Asthma, Serum Sickness, Reversible Airways Disease

Colleges Not Fully Prepared for Students With Food Allergies: Study

Posted 12 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 11, 2016 – Most colleges don't have comprehensive programs to support students with food allergies, putting them at risk for life-threatening allergic reactions, according to a new study. "Our study found that while many colleges offer support for students with food allergy in the dining hall, the same support doesn't carry over to organized sports, dormitories or social events" said lead author Dr. Ruchi Gupta, an associate professor of pediatrics at Northwestern University. "That leaves students feeling vulnerable and scrambling to inform all the various departments of their needs," she added in a news release from the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI). The study also found that students with food allergies are willing to help educate others on campus about food allergies. "Parents tell us they need to educate everyone, literally everyone – ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Anaphylaxis, Oral Allergy Syndrome

How to Introduce Your Baby to Food Containing Peanuts

Posted 11 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 11, 2016 – For parents who are unsure when and how to introduce their babies to food containing peanuts, new guidelines are on the way. The guidelines – coming soon from the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) – are to be presented Friday at the ACAAI's annual meeting in San Francisco. "The first step is determining if your child is at high-risk for peanut allergy," guideline co-author Dr. Amal Assa'ad said in a college news release. "Before introducing peanut-containing foods to a high-risk infant, the infant should be seen by their primary health care provider who will determine if referral to an allergist for testing and/or in-office introduction is needed," said Assa'ad, chair of the ACAAI Food Allergy Committee. Infants with severe eczema and/or an egg allergy are at high risk for peanut allergy, according to the guidelines. Parents are ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Eczema, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Anaphylaxis, Oral Allergy Syndrome

Mouse Study Suggests Way to Stop Poison Ivy's Itch

Posted 8 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 7, 2016 – A new method of stopping the itch caused by poison ivy worked well in mice, researchers report. "Poison ivy rash is the most common allergic reaction in the U.S., and studies have shown that higher levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere are creating a proliferation of poison ivy throughout the U.S. – even in places where it wasn't growing before," said study senior author Sven-Eric Jordt. He's an associate professor of anesthesiology at Duke University School of Medicine in Durham, N.C. "When you consider doctor visits, the costs of the drugs that are prescribed and the lost time at work or at school, the societal costs are quite large," Jordt added in a Duke news release. The itch of poison ivy is caused by an oily sap called urushiol, which is also found in poison sumac and poison oak. In mice with poison ivy rashes, blocking an immune system protein in ... Read more

Related support groups: Skin Rash, Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Diagnosis and Investigation

Food Labels on Potential Allergens May Confuse Shoppers

Posted 1 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 1, 2016 – Shoppers are often confused by food labels that warn of potential allergens, and the consequences can be serious, new research suggests. "Up to 40 percent of consumers who either themselves have a food allergy or a child with a food allergy are purchasing products with precautionary allergen labels," said lead researcher Dr. Ruchi Gupta. She is a pediatrician at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago. The most misunderstood food labels, the researchers found, are those that say "may contain" or "manufactured on shared equipment." While those labels may sound like the foods aren't as dangerous as those that say a product definitely contains a particular allergen, that's not the case, Gupta stressed. Gupta and her colleagues conducted an online survey of more than 6,600 respondents in the United States and Canada. Those answering the questions either ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Zyrtec, Hydroxyzine, Promethazine, Claritin, Allegra, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Allergic Rhinitis, Phenergan, Hay Fever, Cetirizine, Vistaril, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Periactin, Chlorpheniramine

Clean Home May Help Keep Kids' Asthma in Check

Posted 31 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 – Reducing indoor allergens and pollutants can help control children's asthma, reducing their need for medication, according to a new report from the American Academy of Pediatrics. Many things in the home contribute to asthma symptoms and attacks, said report co-author Dr. Elizabeth Matsui. Dust mites and mold top the list, along with furry pets, smoke, cockroaches and airborne fragrances and chemicals. "By intervening, you can have a big impact on your child's asthma," said Matsui, a professor of pediatrics, epidemiology and environmental health sciences at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore. As many as 1 in 10 American kids has asthma, a chronic lung condition that makes it hard to breathe, according to the academy. Their inflamed, narrowed airways lead to wheezing, tightening in the chest, shortness of breath and coughing. The first ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Asthma, Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Asthma - Maintenance, Asthma - Acute, Allergic Asthma

Be Allergy Aware: Join the Teal Pumpkin Project on Halloween

Posted 28 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 28, 2016 – Halloween can be ver-r-r-r-y frightful for kids with food allergies, but the Teal Pumpkin Project aims to make their trick-or-treating safer and more fun. The initiative from Food Allergy Research & Education (FARE) asks people to offer non-food treats at Halloween, and to place a teal pumpkin or sign in view to let trick-or-treaters know such treats are available. You can paint a pumpkin teal or get a teal pumpkin at a craft shop or drug store. A free sign is available at FARE's website. One child in 13 in the United States has a potentially life-threatening food allergy, according to FARE. "This year in particular, more people are becoming aware of how life-altering a food allergy diagnosis can be, and how difficult it can be to manage this potentially life-threatening medical condition," said Lois Witkop, FARE's chief advancement officer. "We hope that ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Anaphylaxis

Skin Patch May Help With Peanut Allergy

Posted 28 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 28, 2016 – A skin patch that delivers small amounts of peanut protein may help treat children and young adults with peanut allergy, researchers report. The new approach "looks promising and has potential," said study author Dr. Marshall Plaut. He is chief of the food allergy, atopic dermatitis and allergic mechanisms section at the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Plaut's research team worked with 74 children and young adults, aged 4 to 25, who are allergic to peanuts. The volunteers were randomly assigned to wear either a high-dose patch (250 micrograms), a low-dose patch (100 micrograms) or a placebo patch. Participants put a new patch on daily, sticking it to their arm or between their shoulder blades. At the one-year mark, the researchers evaluated whether the participants were able to consume at least 10 times more peanut protein than they ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Anaphylaxis

Health Tip: Health Tip: Manage Allergies

Posted 20 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

-- If pets make you sniffle, sneeze, itch and cough, there are things you can do that don't include getting rid of Fido or Fluffy. The American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology recommends: Limiting how much time you spend around your pet. Taking nasal spray, an antihistamine or bronchodilator, as directed by your allergist. Talking to your doctor about allergy shots. Don't let the pet into your bedroom. Always wash your hands immediately after touching your pet. Give the pet a bath once weekly. Use a high-efficiency vacuum or HEPA air filter at home. Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Zyrtec, Hydroxyzine, Promethazine, Claritin, Allegra, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Allergic Rhinitis, Phenergan, Hay Fever, Cetirizine, Vistaril, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Flonase, Fexofenadine, Periactin

Parents of Kids With Food Allergies Believe They're Allergic, Too

Posted 12 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 – Many parents of children with food allergies mistakenly believe they are allergic, too, a new study finds. The study included parents who said they, like their kids, had food allergies. But fewer than one-third of the parents tested positive for food allergies. The study was published Oct. 12 in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. "Either people haven't been tested and are assuming an allergy from a previous reaction to a food, or they haven't been tested properly and may not truly have an allergy. Allergy testing, including blood and skin prick testing, is not always reliable," co-lead author Dr. Melanie Makhija said in a journal news release. The study included nearly 2,500 parents whose children had food allergies. Of these, almost 14 percent of parents said they themselves had a food allergy. But when those parents were tested, researchers found ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Zyrtec, Hydroxyzine, Promethazine, Claritin, Allegra, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Allergic Rhinitis, Phenergan, Hay Fever, Cetirizine, Vistaril, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Periactin, Chlorpheniramine

Health Tip: Kick Dust Mites Out of Bed

Posted 10 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Do you wake up sneezing and sniffling? Dust mites in your bed could be to blame. But you don't have to share your bed with these critters. Here are suggestions from the National Sleep Foundation: Run a dehumidifier in your bedroom, as dust mites thrive in humid conditions. Buy dust-proof covers for your pillows and mattress. Every week, wash bedding in very hot water and dry it in the hot cycle. Dust and vacuum your bedroom weekly. Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies

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