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How to Fight Dry, Itchy Eyes This Winter

Posted 26 Dec 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 26, 2017 – Add dry eyes to the health woes of winter. "On average, the humidity drops in the winter with the colder weather [and] most people turn on the heat in their homes or offices to combat the cold," said Dr. Marissa Locy, who's with the University of Alabama at Birmingham's department of ophthalmology. "What you end up having is lower humidity outside, and even lower humidity inside – making for warm, dry conditions where moisture can evaporate from the eye faster than normal," she explained in a university news release. That can leave your eyes feeling dry, gritty, stuck and irritated. What to do? Locy suggests several steps to protect your eyes from becoming dry: Use a humidifier to help restore humidity to the air and moisture to the eyes. Drink lots of fluids to keep your body hydrated and maintain moisture in your eyes. Protect your eyes from extreme cold ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Eye Conditions, Eye Dryness/Redness, Eye Redness/Itching

Keeping the Holidays Allergy and Asthma-Free

Posted 21 Dec 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 21, 2017 – Allergies and asthma can be worse than the Grinch when it comes to ruining your holiday spirit. "People may not want to admit their allergies and asthma interfere with their holiday fun, but the truth is, symptoms can occur any time of the year," said Dr. Bradley Chipps, president of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. "If you keep in mind some simple tips, you can prepare yourself – and your nose and eyes – for allergy symptoms that may crop up during the holidays," he said in a news release from the organization. First of all, protect yourself from the flu by getting a flu shot and washing your hands regularly and thoroughly. People with asthma need to remember that very cold, dry air can trigger asthma symptoms. So if you have asthma, cover your mouth and nose with a scarf or face mask when you're outside. That's especially true if ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Asthma, Nasal Polyps, Allergic Asthma

Health Tip: Going Gluten-Free?

Posted 20 Dec 2017 by Drugs.com

-- If you've got celiac disease or have another reason to go gluten-free, there are lots of ways to avoid dietary wheat, rye and barley. The American Diabetes Association says healthier gluten-free options include: Amaranth. Arrowroot. Beans (kidney, black, soy, navy, pinto). Buckwheat. Corn. Flax. Gluten-free baked products (made from corn, rice, soy, nut, teff or potato flour). Kasha. Millet. Polenta. Potatoes. Quinoa. Rice. Sorghum. Soy. Tapioca. Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Celiac Disease

Flu Shot Safe Even With an Egg Allergy

Posted 19 Dec 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 19, 2017 – It's safe for people with an egg allergy to get a flu shot, says a leading U.S. allergists' group. Doctors no longer need to question patients about egg allergy before giving the vaccine, according to an updated guideline from the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. "When someone gets a flu shot, health care providers often ask if they are allergic to eggs," said guideline lead author Dr. Matthew Greenhawt. "We want health care providers and people with egg allergy to know there is no need to ask this question anymore, and no need to take any special precautions," said Greenhawt, chair of the college's food allergy committee. The guideline is consistent with recommendations from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Academy of Pediatrics. The "overwhelming evidence" since 2011 has shown that a flu shot poses no ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, FluLaval, Influenza Prophylaxis, Afluria, Fluzone, Flublok Quadrivalent, Vaccination and Prophlaxis, Flublok, Influenza Virus Vaccine, Inactivated, Fluzone Preservative-Free, Fluzone High-Dose, Fluarix, Flucelvax, Fluzone WV, Fluzone Quadrivalent, Flucelvax 2016-2017, Fluogen, Fluarix Quadrivalent, Fluzone 2015-2016

New Hope for Kids With Multiple Food Allergies

Posted 12 Dec 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 12, 2017 – A treatment for kids with more than one dangerous food allergy shows promise in early trials, researchers say. Almost one-third of people with a food allergy have reactions to more than one type of food. This can increase the risk of accidental exposure and life-threatening anaphylaxis, according to researchers at Stanford University School of Medicine. No treatment exists for multiple food allergies. Usually, patients are told to avoid the food triggers, but this requires constant attention to their diet. "Patients find it very hard to live with multiple food allergies," said study senior author Dr. Sharon Chinthrajah. "It puts a huge social and economic burden on families." In this new study, scientists combined the asthma drug omalizumab (Xolair) with immunotherapy for 48 children with more than one food allergy. Immunotherapy exposes patients to tiny ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Xolair, Anaphylaxis, Omalizumab

Sniffing Out the Best Allergy Treatment

Posted 28 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 28, 2017 – Seasonal allergies make life miserable for millions of Americans. So, in a bid to ease some of that discomfort, experts from two leading groups of allergists created a task force that has just issued new practice guidelines on the best ways to quell those bothersome symptoms. The consensus? For most people, nasal steroid sprays are the way to go, according to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI) and the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI). The sprays are easy to get – many are available over-the-counter. And, they're relatively inexpensive. For the OTC versions, a month of treatment is about $15 to $20. OTC brand names include Nasacort, Nasonex, Flonase and Rhinocort, while prescription brands include Beconase, Qnasl and Veramyst, according to the AAAAI. But the biggest reason the experts are recommending nasal ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Symbicort, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Triamcinolone, Fluticasone, Flonase, Advair HFA, Advair Diskus, Qvar, Nasonex, Budesonide, Flovent, Breo Ellipta, Entocort, Dulera, Kenalog, Nasacort, Elocon

FDA Approves Kaléo’s Auvi-Q (Epinephrine Injection, USP) 0.1 mg Auto-Injector for Life-Threatening Allergic Reactions in Infants and Small Children

Posted 28 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

Richmond, VA (November 20, 2017) kaléo, a privately-held pharmaceutical company, today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved its supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) for Auvi-Q (epinephrine injection, USP) 0.1 mg, the first and only epinephrine auto-injector (EAI) specifically designed for the treatment of life-threatening allergic reactions, including anaphylaxis, in infants and small children weighing 16.5 to 33 pounds (7.5 to 15 kilograms) who are at risk for or have a history of serious allergic reactions. The sNDA for the Auvi-Q 0.1 mg Auto-injector was granted Priority Review by the FDA, an expedited regulatory pathway reserved for products that may provide significant improvements in the safety or effectiveness of the treatment, diagnosis, or prevention of serious conditions when compared to available therapies. Auvi-Q is a compact ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Anaphylaxis, Epinephrine, Auvi-Q

Brush Up on Fall Allergies Before Tackling the Leaves

Posted 26 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, Nov. 26, 2017 – Fall yardwork can stir up allergies, but there are ways to reduce the risk of flare-ups, an ear, nose and throat specialist says. "Know your triggers and avoid those triggers," said Dr. Do-Yeon Cho, an assistant professor of otolaryngology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. "First, find out if you're allergic to any seasonal pollens," Cho said in a university news release. "Your ENT [ear, nose and throat specialist] or allergist can easily figure out allergic culprits by doing simple skin tests or blood work." Unlike sniffles caused by cold viruses, allergy-related itchy eyes and sneezes stem from an immune system reaction to certain substances. If you have seasonal allergies, limit outdoor activities during that specific season. Wear a mask if doing yardwork. And change clothing and shower as soon as you get indoors because pollen and other allergens ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Claritin, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Allegra, Phenergan, Vistaril, Cetirizine, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Xyzal, Periactin, Anaphylaxis, Levocetirizine

Working With Your School Nurse

Posted 3 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 3, 2017 – Nearly 18 percent of kids have a chronic health condition, such as asthma or allergies. If your child is one of them, working successfully with your school's nurse will help keep him or her safe. Because a good chunk of a child's day is spent in school, it's important to communicate clearly and regularly with this key member of the administration. Start every school year with a visit to the nurse's office to drop off medication and paperwork from your pediatrician. The nurse will likely develop an individualized health care plan, or IHCP, that's based on the doctor's written action plan. Depending on your child's age, the medication permission form will state if he or she can carry and use medication on his or her own, although the school may have its own rules about this. Be very specific in your discussions. For example, if your child has asthma, the school ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Asthma, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Asthma - Maintenance, Claritin, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Allegra, Allergic Rhinitis, Phenergan, Hay Fever, Vistaril, Cetirizine, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fluticasone

Health Tip: Have Fun on Halloween, Despite Asthma

Posted 31 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Halloween is a favorite holiday for children, but kids with asthma need to take special precautions. The American Lung Association suggests how to keep your asthmatic child safer during Halloween: Avoid fright fests – Activities such as hayrides, corn mazes and visiting haunted houses can trigger an asthmatic episode. If your child participates in these activities, make sure the child carries quick-relief medication at all times. Do not use masks – Costumes and masks may contain latex, a common asthma trigger. Read labels on costumes and masks to see if they contain this ingredient. Avoid makeup – Costume makeup may have a strong odor that could trigger asthma. If possible, skip makeup or use unscented and hypoallergenic products. Stay out of the leaves – It is fun to jump in leaves, but they may contain molds and fungus, which are common asthma triggers. Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Asthma, Asthma - Maintenance, Asthma - Acute, Allergic Asthma, Reversible Airways Disease

Kids' Food Allergies, Especially to Peanuts, Are on the Rise

Posted 27 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 27, 2017 – The number of U.S. children allergic to peanuts has increased by 21 percent since 2010, with nearly 2.5 percent of youngsters now having this type of allergy, a new study has found. Peanut allergies aren't the only ones on the rise, however. The researchers surveyed more than 53,000 households nationwide between October 2015 and September 2016 and found that rates of tree nut, shellfish, fin fish and sesame allergies among children also are increasing. For example, tree nut allergy rose 18 percent since 2010, and shellfish allergy increased 7 percent, according to the study. The findings were scheduled to be presented Oct. 27-30 at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology's annual meeting, in Boston. The study also found that black children are much more likely to have certain food allergies than white children. "According to our data, the risk of ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Claritin, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Allegra, Phenergan, Vistaril, Cetirizine, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Xyzal, Periactin, Anaphylaxis, Epinephrine

Can Man's Best Friend Chase Away Eczema, Asthma?

Posted 27 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 27, 2017 – Parents of children struggling with eczema or asthma might think that having a dog would only make it harder to control their child's condition. But two new studies suggest man's furry best friend might actually provide some protection against allergic diseases. The first study contends that having a dog in the house before you're even born may help keep eczema at bay at least until your toddler years. The skin disorder is marked by dry, extremely itchy patches. "Eczema is usually the first manifestation of [allergic disease] and eczema can predict the development of other [allergic diseases] as kids grow," said study author Dr. Gagandeep Cheema, an allergy and immunology fellow at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. The researchers analyzed 782 mother-child pairs and collected data on prenatal exposure to dogs, which included days where a dog spent at least one ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Asthma, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Asthma - Maintenance, Claritin, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Allegra, Allergic Rhinitis, Phenergan, Hay Fever, Vistaril, Cetirizine, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fluticasone

Many Food Allergies May Develop in Adulthood

Posted 27 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 27, 2017 – Is the roof of your mouth itchy after a peanut butter sandwich? Does your skin break out in hives after you've cracked your way through a lobster dinner? It's possible you're one of the many adults who developed a food allergy as an adult, a new study says. Researchers surveyed adults with food allergies and found that nearly half said that one or more of their allergies began in adulthood. "Food allergies are often seen as a condition that begins in childhood, so the idea that 45 percent of adults with food allergies develop them in adulthood is surprising," said study lead author Dr. Ruchi Gupta. She is with Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. Shellfish is the most common food allergy among U.S. adults, currently at 3.6 percent. That's a 44 percent increase from the rate of 2.5 percent reported in a 2004 study. The new study also ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Claritin, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Allegra, Allergic Rhinitis, Phenergan, Hay Fever, Vistaril, Cetirizine, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Xyzal, Periactin

Health Tip: Recognize Symptoms of Latex Allergy

Posted 20 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

-- An allergy to latex is quite common. So much so that your doctor or dentist may ask you if you have one before you have any type of examination. The American Dental Association identifies these possible symptoms of a latex allergy: Skin reactions, such as itching, redness, rash or hives. Itchy nose, throat or eyes. Runny nose, sneezing, coughing or wheezing. Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Anaphylaxis

Exercising With Asthma or Allergies

Posted 20 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 20, 2017 – Allergies and asthma can make exercise more challenging. But if your condition is well managed and you take a few precautions, you should be able to work out without worry. Know your allergy or asthma triggers and exercise around them. For instance, when the pollen count is high, exercise indoors with windows and doors closed. When you do exercise outside, avoid high-allergen areas like grassy fields, parks and heavily trafficked roads. Dry air can be particularly irritating to people with asthma while moist air often makes exercise easier. That might mean skipping endurance activities like cross-country skiing in favor of swimming in an indoor pool. When exercising outdoors, breathe through your nose rather than your mouth as much as possible – nasal passages filter air and trap allergens and irritants. Long-distance running and high-energy basketball are ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Asthma, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Asthma - Maintenance, Claritin, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Allegra, Phenergan, Vistaril, Cetirizine, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fluticasone, Qvar, Ribavirin

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