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Penicillin Misconceptions May Raise Post-Op Infection Risk

Posted 9 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 9, 2017 – Surgical patients who report having a penicillin allergy face a 50 percent higher risk for a post-op infection compared to patients who report no drug allergy, new research finds. Researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital attributed the higher surgical-site infection rate to the use of alternative antibiotics. Since many people erroneously believe they're allergic to penicillin, the findings suggest this common misconception may put some patients in harm's way. "This study has direct clinical significance," said study lead author Dr. Kimberly Blumenthal, who is in the division of rheumatology, allergy and immunology. "We already know that more than 95 percent of patients who believe they have penicillin allergy can actually tolerate the drug," she added. The study results indicate that a preoperative penicillin evaluation could effectively reduce surgical ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Amoxicillin, Allergies, Augmentin, Clavulanate, Amoxicillin/Clavulanate, Angioedema, Anaphylaxis, Ampicillin, Amoxil, Penicillin VK, Dicloxacillin, Cloxacillin, Methicillin, Amoclan, Amoxil Pediatric Drops, Penicillin V Potassium, Zosyn, Augmentin XR, Unasyn

The Best Way to Diagnose a Food Allergy

Posted 8 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 8, 2017 – Diagnosing a food allergy isn't always simple, but the best way to do it is through an oral food challenge, according to a new study. "It's important to have an accurate diagnosis of food allergy so an allergist can make a clear recommendation as to what foods you need to keep out of your diet," said study senior author and allergist Dr. Carla Davis. "And if no allergy exists, that clears the way to reintroduce foods you may have thought were off-limits," said Davis, an associate professor of pediatrics at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. During an oral food challenge, patients are asked to eat a very small amount of a suspected allergen while under the close supervision of a specially trained doctor, called an allergist. This doctor will evaluate the person for signs of an allergic reaction. Researchers who analyzed more than 6,300 oral food challenges ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Anaphylaxis, Allergic Purpura

How to Fight Fall Allergies

Posted 28 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, Aug. 27, 2017 – People who suffer from allergies may start sneezing and wheezing in the fall, but there are things they can do to ease their seasonal misery. "If it feels as though your allergy symptoms flare up earlier and earlier every year, you're probably not wrong," said Dr. Stephen Tilles, president of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI). "Climate change may actually be causing an earlier and longer fall allergy season," he added in an ACAAI news release. "In addition, windy days can mean heightened allergy symptoms, because wind can carry the pollen from ragweed, grasses and trees up to 100 miles from its source." Tilles provided the following tips to help people with seasonal allergies avoid flare-ups of their symptoms: Plan ahead. So-called "fall" allergens actually start to appear in mid-August. If you rely on allergy medication, start ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Claritin, Loratadine, Allegra, Diphenhydramine, Allergic Rhinitis, Phenergan, Hay Fever, Vistaril, Cetirizine, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Xyzal, Periactin

Scientists Gain Insight Into Allergies

Posted 2 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 2, 2017 – Scientists report they've pinpointed which immune system cells trigger allergies. The discovery may someday lead to a blood test that improves treatment, they suggest. These cells "represent a common enemy to every allergic individual that we can now easily track," said study author Erik Wambre. He's an immunology researcher at Seattle's Benaroya Research Institute at Virginia Mason. Allergic reactions stem from an inappropriate immune response to usually benign substances such as mold, pollen or peanuts. In the United States, almost 50 million Americans have nasal allergies, and as many as 200 die from serious food allergies a year. According to Wambre, more "biomarkers" – signs of illness that can show up in tests – are needed to improve allergy detection and assess treatment. At the moment, doctors rely on skin pricks to test your reaction to ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Claritin, Loratadine, Allegra, Diphenhydramine, Allergic Rhinitis, Phenergan, Hay Fever, Vistaril, Cetirizine, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Xyzal, Periactin

Protect Yourself Against Reactions To Insect Stings

Posted 29 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 29, 2017 – For most of us, an insect bite means an annoying itch and some minor discomfort. But more and more people are having serious – and even potentially deadly – reactions to bites and stings, researchers report. Up to 7 percent of the adult U.S. population now appears to be allergic to insect stings. Reactions can vary from a large, long-lasting swelling just at the site of the bite to a body-wide response that can even interfere with breathing. And once you have an allergic reaction, you stand a good chance of having another one, even 10 or 20 years later. According to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI), the most serious allergic reactions come from yellow jackets, honeybees, paper wasps, hornets and fire ants. Experts suggest that if you've ever had an allergic reaction to a sting, schedule a visit with a board-certified allergist. ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Claritin, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Allegra, Phenergan, Vistaril, Cetirizine, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Claritin-D, Fexofenadine, Xyzal, Periactin, Anaphylaxis

Nearly 4 Percent of Americans Suffer From Food Allergies

Posted 31 May 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 31, 2017 – Millions of Americans have had to swear off shellfish, eggs, peanuts or soy to avoid allergic reactions that can range from stomach cramps to life-threatening swelling of the airways, new research shows. Approximately 4 percent of Americans have a food allergy, with women and Asians the most affected, the study found. "Recent reports suggest that food allergies are on the rise, with more food allergy-related hospitalizations in the U.S. over the last decade," said lead researcher Dr. Li Zhou. She's with the division of general medicine and primary care at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. Food allergies cost the United States an estimated $25 billion annually, Zhou said. For the study, Zhou and her colleagues reviewed nearly 3 million medical records identifying more than 97,000 patients who suffered from one or more food allergies or an intolerance to a ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Angioedema, Anaphylaxis, Epinephrine, EpiPen, Adrenalin, Nasal Polyps, Primatene Mist, Septocaine, EpiPen 2-Pak, Primatene Mist Inhaler, Bupivacaine/Epinephrine, EpiPen Jr, Epinephrine/Lidocaine, Articaine/Epinephrine, Xylocaine Dental, Adrenalin, Topical

Itching for a Solution to That Rash?

Posted 5 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 3, 2017 – Maybe it's a new soap or the dry, cold weather that has turned your hands red and itchy. "There are many reasons for hand rashes," said Dr. Melissa Piliang, a board-certified dermatologist at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio. And the source of the problem isn't always obvious, she and other skin doctors say. An allergy to a new soap or something else you've touched can bring on a hand rash, but it could also reflect something going on inside your body, Piliang said in a news release from the American Academy of Dermatology. "The most common cause is eczema," Piliang said. Eczema is the term for different conditions that cause skin inflammation and irritation. "But some hand rashes may have an allergic cause. Sometimes, an allergy can develop after years of touching the same things daily without a problem, like your wedding ring, skin care products or foods such as ... Read more

Related support groups: Skin Rash, Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Dry Skin, Fleet, Biafine, Skin Care, Aquaphor, Vaseline, Aveeno, Ammonium Lactate, Complex-15, Eucerin, Lubriderm, Replens, Cetaphil Cleanser, Bag Balm, Lanolin, Emollients, Concept

New Guidelines Urge Early Intro to Peanut Products in High-Risk Infants

Posted 5 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 5, 2017 – Babies at increased risk for peanut allergy should have peanut-containing foods added to their diets as early as 4 months of age, new U.S. guidelines suggest. The recommendation comes from the U.S. National Institutes of Health and other expert groups. And it advocates a tactic that might seem counterintuitive: To drastically cut the chances of peanut allergy in high-risk babies, parents should introduce "age-appropriate" forms of peanut products early in life. Researchers said the advice is based on a pivotal clinical trial called LEAP, funded by the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, and first published in 2015. That study turned old thinking about peanut allergies on its head. At one time, doctors recommended complete peanut avoidance for babies and young children at high risk of an allergic reaction. That advice, however, didn't ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Claritin, Loratadine, Allegra, Diphenhydramine, Allergic Rhinitis, Phenergan, Hay Fever, Vistaril, Cetirizine, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Xyzal, Periactin

Congress Questioning EpiPen Price Hike

Posted 23 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

Members of Congress want the maker of EpiPens to explain why the price of the lifesaving product has risen 400 percent since 2007 and now costs as much as $600. An EpiPen delivers a potentially life-saving injection of medicine into people suffering a severe allergic reaction. In a letter to the pharmaceutical company Mylan, Senator Charles Grassley, the Iowa Republican who heads the Judiciary Committee, demanded to know the reasons for the huge price hike, The New York Times reported. "Access to epinephrine can mean the difference between life and death, especially for children," wrote Grassley, who also noted that many children who need EpiPens are enrolled in government health care programs. "It follows that many of the children who are prescribed EpiPens are covered by Medicaid, and therefore, the taxpayers are picking up the tab for this medication," he wrote. Previously, Senator ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Anaphylaxis, Epinephrine, EpiPen, Adrenalin, Primatene Mist, Septocaine, EpiPen 2-Pak, Primatene Mist Inhaler, Epinephrine/Lidocaine, Articaine/Epinephrine, EpiPen Jr, Bupivacaine/Epinephrine, Adrenalin, Topical, Zorcaine, E-Pilo-1, Medihaler-Epi, Allergic Purpura, Ana-Kit

4 Ways to Protect Yourself Against Poison Ivy, Oak and Sumac

Posted 11 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 11, 2016 – When you're enjoying the great outdoors, be on the lookout for poison ivy, poison oak and poison sumac. The urushiol oil in their sap can cause itching, a red rash and blisters. These symptoms can appear from a few hours to several days after exposure, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Learn what these plants look like so you can avoid them. The old saying "Leaves of three, let it be" is a helpful reminder for poison ivy and poison oak. But it's not foolproof – the form may vary depending on the type of plant you encounter. Poison sumac, meanwhile, usually has clusters of 7 to 13 leaves, according to the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. If you're working in areas with these plants, wear long sleeves, long pants tucked into boots and impermeable gloves. Wash garden tools and gloves regularly. Wash pets if they may ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Claritin, Loratadine, Allegra, Diphenhydramine, Phenergan, Vistaril, Cetirizine, Clobetasol, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fluocinonide, Fexofenadine, Xyzal, Periactin

Giving Certain Foods Early May Cut Allergy Risk

Posted 18 May 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 18, 2016 – Doctors have long warned parents to delay introducing certain foods to babies to decrease the risk of a potential allergic reaction, but a new study suggests that strategy probably doesn't help. The study of about 1,400 children found that when babies were given peanuts, eggs or cow's milk during their first year, they were less likely to become "sensitized" to those common allergy-causing foods. Being sensitized to a food means a child tests positive on a skin test. "That doesn't necessarily mean a food allergy as such, but it indicates the child is on that pathway," said the study's senior author, Dr. Malcolm Sears. The goal is to reduce the risk of sensitization, which also reduces the risk of allergy, said Sears, a professor in the division of respirology at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. The study's lead author, Maxwell Tran, said this ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Anaphylaxis, Allergic Purpura, Oral Allergy Syndrome

Special Infant Formulas Don't Shield Against Asthma, Allergies: Study

Posted 9 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 8, 2016 – Many parents who worry that their baby is at risk of asthma, allergies or type 1 diabetes may turn to special cow's milk formulas touted to lower the risk. But a new review of the data on these "hydrolyzed" infant formulas finds no good evidence that they actually protect children from the autoimmune disorders. "We found no consistent evidence to support a protective role for partially or extensively hydrolyzed formula," concluded a team led by Robert Boyle of Imperial College London in England. "Our findings conflict with current international guidelines, in which hydrolyzed formula is widely recommended for young formula-fed infants with a family history of allergic disease," the study authors added. One expert in the United States said the finding casts doubt on the usefulness of these special formula products. "Allergies and autoimmune diseases [such as ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Asthma, Asthma - Maintenance, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Asthma - Acute, Anaphylaxis, Allergic Asthma, Allergic Purpura, Reversible Airways Disease - Maintenance, Reversible Airways Disease

Allergy Shots Still Effective for Seniors

Posted 9 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 9, 2016 – Allergy shots can still benefit seniors with allergies, a new study suggests. The study included 60 people with hay fever between the ages of 65 and 75 who were given either allergy shots or a placebo for three years. Those who received the allergy shots had a 55 percent reduction in symptoms and a 64 percent decrease in their use of allergy relief medication, according to the study results. They were published Feb. 9 in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. The researchers, led by Dr. Andrzej Bozek of Medical University of Silesia in Katowice, Poland, said diagnosis and management of hay fever in seniors can be challenging because they tend to have other health conditions. The researchers added that their findings show that an aging immune system doesn't significantly reduce the effectiveness of allergy shots. While allergy shots are known to benefit ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Claritin, Loratadine, Allegra, Diphenhydramine, Allergic Rhinitis, Phenergan, Hay Fever, Vistaril, Cetirizine, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Xyzal, Periactin

Health Tip: Use Antibiotics Wisely

Posted 1 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

-- An antibiotic can be a lifesaver if you or someone you love has a bacterial infection. But an antibiotic isn't always appropriate or necessary, warns the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Here are potential risks: Causing inadvertent destruction of "good" bacteria, which may cause additional problems, such as a yeast infection or diarrhea. Causing an infection that's resistant to antibiotics and is difficult to treat. This type of infection may become severe and lead to hospitalization. Developing a serious allergic reaction that may require hospitalization. Before you use any antibiotic, make sure your doctor approves. Read more

Related support groups: Antibiotic, Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Anaphylaxis, Allergic Purpura, Oral Allergy Syndrome

Allergy and Asthma Sufferers Beware as Holiday Season Kicks In

Posted 23 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, Nov. 21, 2015 – There are a number of steps people with allergies and asthma can take to deal with the challenges they may face over the holidays, an expert says. "Two-thirds of allergy sufferers have symptoms year-round, so it's not just a matter of the first freeze hitting and your symptoms disappearing," Dr. Bryan Martin, president of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI), said in a college news release. "Even after the pollen season dies down, there are environmental triggers to deal with – things like mold, dust and pet dander. The winter holidays can bring a whole new set of triggers," he explained. For example, very cold, dry air can trigger asthma, experts warn. When going outside in very cold weather, people with asthma should cover their mouth and nose with a scarf or face mask, especially if they're exercising. People with allergies and ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Asthma, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Asthma - Maintenance, Claritin, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Allegra, Allergic Rhinitis, Phenergan, Hay Fever, Vistaril, Cetirizine, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Flonase

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