Skip to Content

Join the 'Aleve PM' group to help and get support from people like you.

Aleve PM News

Common Painkillers Tied to Slight Rise in Heart Attack Risk

Posted 15 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 9, 2017 – Commonly used painkillers such as Motrin, Advil and Aleve might increase your risk for heart attack, even in the first week of use, a new study suggests. Overall, these drugs and others known as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) increase the risk of a heart attack by 20 to 50 percent, compared with not using them, researchers found. For most people, however, this represents only a small increased risk – about 1 percent a year, the researchers said. Still, "from the viewpoint of public health, even small increases in risk of heart attack are important because use of NSAIDs is so widespread," said lead researcher Michele Bally. She's an epidemiologist at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Center. The increased risk of heart attack associated with NSAIDs was seen at any dose taken for one week, one month or more than one month. And the risk ... Read more

Related support groups: Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Heart Disease, Ischemic Stroke, Heart Attack, Celebrex, Advil, Diclofenac, Voltaren, Aleve, Voltaren Gel, Motrin, Transient Ischemic Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Vicoprofen, Flector, Advil PM, Flector Patch, Arthrotec, Naprosyn

Chiropractors Not Magicians When It Comes to Chronic Back Pain

Posted 11 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 11, 2017 – Chiropractors can help ease some cases of low back pain, though their treatments may be no better than taking an over-the-counter pain reliever, a new analysis finds. The review of 26 clinical trials found that manipulating the spine can bring "modest" relief to people with acute low back pain – pain that has lasted no more than six weeks. Chiropractors perform spinal manipulation, as do some doctors, physical therapists and other health professionals. Most insurers, Medicare and Medicaid pay for some chiropractic services, according to the American Chiropractic Association. But spinal manipulation is no magic bullet, the researchers behind the new study said. The benefits appear similar to those of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen and naproxen. It seems that when it comes to low back pain, no one has found a quick fix. That ... Read more

Related support groups: Back Pain, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Sciatica, Advil, Aleve, Motrin, Scoliosis, Vicoprofen, Advil PM, Naprosyn, Advil Cold and Sinus, Vimovo, Treximet, Naprelan '375', Naprelan, Aleve PM, Anaprox, Hydrocodone/Ibuprofen, Duexis

Marathon Running May Cause Short-Term Kidney Injury

Posted 28 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 28, 2017 – Any marathoner will tell you that the grueling 26-mile races can do a number on the hips, knees, ankles and feet. Now, a small study suggests that these tests of endurance are also tough on the kidneys. "Marathon runners demonstrate transient or reversible short-term kidney injury," said Dr. Chirag Parikh, professor of medicine at Yale University. In his study of 22 participants in the 2015 Hartford, Conn. Marathon, Parikh found that 82 percent showed acute kidney injury after the race. In this condition, the kidneys fail to filter waste from the blood. The good news is that the kidney injury seems to clear up within two days of the race, he said. "On day 2, they are all fine," Parikh said. Runners likely don't even know they've had this transient injury, Parikh said. "For the short term, I don't think they would notice anything," he said. Parikh isn't certain ... Read more

Related support groups: Percocet, Vicodin, Norco, Lortab, Tylenol, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Acetaminophen, Advil, Aleve, Renal Failure, Paracetamol, Motrin, Fioricet, Excedrin, Darvocet-N 100, Endocet, Acetaminophen/Hydrocodone, Tylenol PM, Tylenol with Codeine

Drug No Better Than Placebo for Lower Back, Leg Pain

Posted 23 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 22, 2017 – The widely prescribed pain drug pregabalin (brand name: Lyrica) may be no better than a placebo when it comes to treating the back and leg pain known as sciatica, a new clinical trial suggests. The study, published March 22 in the New England Journal of Medicine, found that sciatica patients improved to the same degree whether they were given pregabalin or placebo capsules. Sciatica refers to pain that radiates along the sciatic nerve, which branches from the low back through the hips and down each leg, according to the U.S. National Institutes of Health. The pain typically shoots down the back of the leg, and some people also have numbness, tingling or muscle weakness. The problem is caused by compression of the sciatic nerve – possibly from a herniated spinal disc. Pregabalin is prescribed to treat various forms of nerve-related pain. In the United ... Read more

Related support groups: Back Pain, Lyrica, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Sciatica, Advil, Aleve, Pregabalin, Herniated Disc, Motrin, Scoliosis, Vicoprofen, Advil PM, Naprosyn, Vimovo, Advil Cold and Sinus, Treximet, Naprelan '375', Naprelan, Aleve PM

Valium May Be Useless for Acute Lower Back Pain

Posted 28 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 27, 2017 – For decades, emergency room staff often gave Valium to patients for an acute bout of bad lower back pain. But a new head-to-head trial in an ER environment casts doubt on the notion that Valium or potent painkillers can really help. As reported Feb. 22 in the Annals of Emergency Medicine, the trial found that Aleve (naproxen) and a "dummy" placebo pill were as effective as naproxen plus Valium (diazepam) in treating ER patients with acute lower back pain. "Our study contributes to the growing body of literature indicating that, in general, most medications do not improve acute lower back pain," lead researcher Dr. Benjamin Friedman, of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City, said in a journal news release. "One week after being discharged from the emergency department, lower back pain patients had improved equally, regardless of whether they ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Back Pain, Valium, Naproxen, Diazepam, Aleve, Naprosyn, Breakthrough Pain, Vimovo, Treximet, Naprelan '375', Naprelan, Aleve PM, Anaprox, Anaprox-DS, Diastat, Midol Extended Relief, Diastat AcuDial, Valrelease, Esomeprazole/naproxen

Kids' OD Risk Rises When Opioids Left Out at Home

Posted 20 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 20, 2017 – A child's risk of a potentially fatal drug overdose more than doubles if a parent brings home a prescription opioid painkiller like oxycodone, codeine or morphine, a new study reports. When their mother is prescribed an opioid for pain as opposed to a non-narcotic drug like aspirin, ibuprofen or acetaminophen, young children are about two-and-a-half times more likely to accidentally overdose, the researchers found. "The opioid epidemic has not skipped children," said Dr. Yaron Finkelstein, a pediatric emergency doctor with the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto. "They are also vulnerable to it, even as a third party or innocent bystander." Finkelstein is lead researcher on the study, published online Feb. 20 in Pediatrics. Another study in the journal helps explain the source of some of this risk. Nearly 70 percent of prescription opioids in homes with ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Suboxone, Oxycodone, Back Pain, Hydrocodone, Tramadol, Methadone, Percocet, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Opiate Dependence, Morphine, Aspirin, Codeine, Lortab, Chronic Pain, Opana, Ibuprofen

Chronic Pain More Likely for Poor, Less Educated: Study

Posted 18 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Feb. 17, 2017 – Chronic pain is much more common among poor, less educated older Americans than their wealthier, more educated peers, a new study suggests. "I found that people with lower levels of education and wealth don't just have more pain, they also have more severe pain," said study author Hanna Grol-Prokopczyk. She's an assistant professor of sociology from the University at Buffalo in Buffalo, N.Y. "I also looked at pain-related disability, meaning that pain is interfering with the ability to do normal work or household activities. And again, people with less wealth and education are more likely to experience this disability," she added in a university news release. In the analysis of 12 years of data from more than 19,000 people aged 51 and older, those with the least education were 80 percent more likely to have chronic pain than those with the most education. People ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Suboxone, Oxycodone, Back Pain, Hydrocodone, Tramadol, Methadone, Percocet, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Chronic Pain, Opana, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Subutex

Try Drug-Free Options First for Low Back Pain, New Guidelines Say

Posted 14 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 13, 2017 – People with low back pain should try drug-free remedies – from simple heat wraps to physical therapy – before resorting to medication, according to new treatment guidelines. Low back pain is among the most common reasons that Americans visit the doctor, according to the American College of Physicians (ACP), which released the new guidelines on Monday. The recommendations put more emphasis on nondrug therapies than previous ones have. They stress that powerful opioid painkillers – such as OxyContin and Vicodin – should be used only as a last resort in some cases of long-lasting back pain. Another change: When medication is needed, acetaminophen (Tylenol) is no longer recommended. Recent research has shown it's not effective for low back pain, said Dr. Nitin Damle, president of the ACP. The good news, according to Damle, is that most people with shorter-term ... Read more

Related support groups: Oxycodone, Back Pain, Hydrocodone, Cymbalta, Tramadol, Methadone, OxyContin, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Opana, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Subutex, Dilaudid, Meloxicam, Sciatica, Opana ER, Advil, Diclofenac

Low Back Pain? Relax, Breathe and Try Yoga

Posted 10 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Feb. 10, 2017 – For people experiencing low back pain, the thought of exercise often seems daunting. But yoga may be a natural fit in the quest to relieve an aching back, a new review indicates. The findings come from an analysis of 12 studies that included more than 1,000 participants with lower back pain. The studies compared yoga to physical therapy or patient education. There was some evidence that yoga led to small improvements in pain, and small to moderate improvements in back function at three and six months. "We found that the practice of yoga was linked to pain relief and improvement in function," said review author L. Susan Wieland. She is an assistant professor of family and community medicine at the University of Maryland. "For some patients suffering from chronic non-specific low back pain, yoga may be worth considering as a form of treatment," Wieland added in a ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Back Pain, Percocet, Vicodin, Norco, Lortab, Chronic Pain, Tylenol, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Meloxicam, Acetaminophen, Advil, Diclofenac, Voltaren, Aleve, Mobic, Paracetamol, Motrin, Fioricet

Truckers' Poor Health: An Accident Waiting to Happen?

Posted 19 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 19, 2017 – Truck drivers spend long hours behind the wheel and often eat less-than-healthy food at roadside stops. These behaviors can raise their risk of multiple health conditions, which boost their chances of getting into a crash, a new study suggests. Researchers examined data from more than 49,000 commercial truck drivers and found that 34 percent had at least one of several health problems – such as heart disease, low back pain and diabetes – that have been linked with poor driving performance. Truck drivers with three or more of the flagged medical conditions were two to four times more likely to be in a crash than their healthier peers, the University of Utah researchers found. For example, the rate of crashes resulting in injury among all truck drivers was 29 per 100 million miles traveled, but was 93 per 100 million miles traveled for drivers with three or ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Obesity, Back Pain, Metoprolol, Heart Disease, Weight Loss, Atenolol, Bystolic, Bisoprolol, Fioricet, Excedrin, Insulin Resistance, Tylenol PM, Toprol-XL, Pre-Diabetes, Lopressor, Advil PM, Metoprolol Succinate ER, Fiorinal, Tenormin

Celebrex May Not Pose Bigger Heart Risk Than Similar Drugs: Study

Posted 14 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 14, 2016 – Some people taking the pain reliever Celebrex may not have a greater risk for heart problems than those taking other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), a new study says. Celebrex (celecoxib) is a COX-2 inhibitor. That's the same class of drugs as Vioxx and Bextra, which were pulled from the market in 2004 and 2005, respectively, because they were linked to heart problems. Celebrex didn't seem to share the same issues, so has remained available. And the new trial's "primary message is that celecoxib is not riskier for the heart than other NSAIDs," said study director Dr. Steven Nissen in a Cleveland Clinic news release. Nissen is chair of the Department of Cardiovascular Medicine. Nissen's prior research was instrumental in uncovering the cardiovascular risks associated with COX-2 inhibitors. The new study seems to reaffirm Celebrex's safety profile. ... Read more

Related support groups: Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Heart Disease, Celebrex, Advil, Aleve, Motrin, Vicoprofen, Advil PM, Naprosyn, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Advil Cold and Sinus, Vimovo, Treximet, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Vioxx, Celecoxib, Naprelan '375', Naprelan, Aleve PM

'Fake Pills' May Help Ease Back Pain

Posted 20 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 19, 2016 – Even if they know the pills are fake, chronic back pain sufferers may get relief from placebo drugs, a new study indicates. Researchers found that patients who knowingly took a placebo pill while undergoing traditional treatment for lower back pain had less pain and disability than those who received traditional treatment alone. "These findings turn our understanding of the placebo effect on its head," said Ted Kaptchuk, a joint senior author of the study and director of the Program in Placebo Studies and the Therapeutic Encounter at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. "This new research demonstrates that the placebo effect is not necessarily elicited by patients' conscious expectation that they are getting an active medicine, as long thought," Kaptchuk added in a hospital news release. "Taking a pill in the context of a patient-clinician ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Suboxone, Oxycodone, Back Pain, Hydrocodone, Tramadol, Methadone, Percocet, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Chronic Pain, Opana, Subutex, Dilaudid, Sciatica

Could Prescribed NSAID Painkillers Raise Heart Failure Risk?

Posted 29 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28, 2016 – Use of prescription-strength ibuprofen, naproxen and other commonly used pain relievers may be tied to a higher risk of heart failure, researchers report. Medicines like these fall into a category of painkillers known as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). These medications may raise a person's relative risk of heart failure by nearly 20 percent, according to the analysis of medical records for nearly 10 million patients. That risk increases with the amount of NSAIDs a person is taking, said study author Andrea Arfe, a Ph.D. student at University of Milano-Bicocca, in Italy. A person's risk of hospitalization for heart failure doubles for some NSAIDs used at very high doses, including diclofenac (Cataflam or Voltaren), etoricoxib (Arcoxia), indomethacin (Indocin), and piroxicam (Feldene), Arfe said. Also, "our findings – which focused only on ... Read more

Related support groups: Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Meloxicam, Advil, Diclofenac, Heart Failure, Voltaren, Congestive Heart Failure, Aleve, Mobic, Motrin, Indomethacin, Toradol, Etodolac, Vicoprofen, Nabumetone, Flector, Advil PM, Left Ventricular Dysfunction, Arthrotec

Opioid Abuse Fueling Drug-Related Heart Infections: Study

Posted 1 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 1, 2016 – The number of Americans hospitalized with heart infections caused by use of injected opioid drugs is on the rise, a new study indicates. Researchers from Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston said the finding is a disturbing outgrowth of a rising tide of opioid addiction in the United States. For the study, the researchers reviewed U.S. hospital admissions for infective endocarditis, a sometimes deadly infection of the heart valves. Although people born with abnormal valves and older adults with valve problems are at added risk for the condition, it can also result from injecting drugs. Injections can introduce bacteria into the bloodstream, the researchers said. In 2013, 12 percent of hospitalizations for infective endocarditis were related to injection drug use, compared to 7 percent in 2000, the study team found. The actual number of cases rose to ... Read more

Related support groups: Suboxone, Oxycodone, Hydrocodone, Tramadol, Methadone, Percocet, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Opiate Dependence, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Opiate Withdrawal, Opana, Subutex, Dilaudid, Opana ER, Roxicodone

Health Tip: Reading the Label on OTC Medications

Posted 30 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Knowing how to properly use over-the-counter medications can help prevent serious reactions and interactions. Here's how to read labels, courtesy of the American Academy of Family Physicians: The active ingredient, or ingredients, is the first thing on the label and it is the chemical that works to manage the symptoms. Uses, or indications, explain what conditions this medication can treat. Warnings provide safety information, including whether or not you should consult a doctor, side effects and what to avoid when you take this medication. Directions tell you how often to take a medicine and exactly how much to take. Other information explains other important details, such as storage recommendations. Inactive ingredients explain chemicals included that don't treat symptoms. This includes things such as binding agents or preservatives. Questions and comments provides information ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Suboxone, Percocet, Cancer, Vicodin, Norco, Lortab, Asthma, Fever, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Heart Disease, Meloxicam, Advil, Diclofenac, Voltaren, Aleve, Mobic, Motrin, Fioricet

Page 1 2 3 4 Next

Ask a Question

Further Information

Related Condition Support Groups

Insomnia, Pain

Aleve PM Patient Information at Drugs.com