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Related terms: Alcohol Use Disorder, AUD

Which Single Behavior Best Prevents High Blood Pressure?

Posted 6 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 14, 2017 – You probably already know that certain healthy lifestyle behaviors can reduce your risk of developing high blood pressure, but is any one behavior more important than the others? Maybe, as new research suggests maintaining a healthy weight is the No. 1 behavior to prevent unhealthy blood pressure levels. "Our results indicate by maintaining a healthy body weight into middle age, you can help preserve low blood pressure," said the study's lead author, John Booth III. He's a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. "There have been increases in blood pressure at younger ages, which are linked to heart disease and stroke," Booth said. "We evaluated the long-term impact of maintaining healthy behaviors on [high blood pressure]." Booth and his colleagues looked at the effects of five healthy behaviors: Never smoking Drinking 7 or fewer ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Obesity, Hypertension, Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Alcohol Dependence, Alcoholism, Hangover, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Acute Alcohol Intoxication

App to Help Treat Substance Abuse Approved

Posted 6 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 14, 2017 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved its first mobile app to help treat substance abuse, the agency said Thursday in a news release. The Reset application is designed to help treat abuse of alcohol, cocaine, marijuana and stimulant medications. But the app is not intended for opioid dependence, the FDA said. Citing the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, the FDA said criteria for Substance Use Disorders (SUD) are met when chronic use of these substances causes "significant impairment, such as health problems, disability and failure to meet major responsibilities at work, school or home." The newly-approved app delivers behavioral therapy that's designed to "increase abstinence from substance abuse and increase [participation] in outpatient therapy programs," the FDA said. "This is an example of how innovative digital ... Read more

Related support groups: Opiate Dependence, Opiate Withdrawal, Smoking Cessation, Drug Dependence, Substance Abuse, Alcoholism, Hangover, Cannabis, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse, Substance Abuse - Cocaine, Acute Alcohol Intoxication, C-Topical Solution

ER Visits for These 3 Health Woes Don't Have to Happen

Posted 8 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 12, 2017 – Each year, thousands of Americans end up in hospital emergency rooms for problems that could have been avoided, new research shows. The top causes of preventable ER visits in the United States include alcohol abuse, dental problems and mental health disorders such as depression and anxiety, the new study says. ER visits could be reduced if patients had better access to dental and mental health care, according to researchers from the University of California, San Francisco. The study comes as some insurers are looking to cut back on coverage for ER visits they deem "inappropriate" or avoidable. Researchers reviewed 424 million ER visits by 18- to 64-year-old patients between 2005 and 2011. Nearly 14 million visits (3.3 percent) were avoidable, meaning patients were sent home without receiving any care. The main reasons for avoidable visits were toothaches, back ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Major Depressive Disorder, Oral and Dental Conditions, Toothache, Alcohol Dependence, Dysthymia, Gingivitis, Alcoholism, Periodontitis, Stomatitis, Prevention of Dental Caries, Acute Alcohol Intoxication

Is an Occasional Drink OK During Pregnancy?

Posted 8 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 12, 2017 – During the nine months of pregnancy, many pregnant women have wondered – would one or two glasses of wine really put my baby at risk? And, unfortunately, researchers still don't know for sure. But a new review of several existing studies hints that small amounts of alcohol may slightly boost the risk of premature birth and low birth weight. The researchers acknowledge that the studies so far have been sparse and, in some cases, flimsy. Yet, there's "some evidence that even light alcohol consumption in pregnancy is associated with risk of delivering a small baby and, to some extent, also with the risk of premature delivery, although this was less clear," said review lead author Loubaba Mamluk. She's a researcher at the University of Bristol in England. Dr. Paul Jarris, chief medical officer of the March of Dimes, acknowledged that research hasn't been ... Read more

Related support groups: Alcoholism, Hangover, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Acute Alcohol Intoxication

Health Tip: Diet and Activity May Help Prevent Cancer

Posted 16 days ago by Drugs.com

-- Multiple studies have shown a correlation between diet and physical activity on your risk of developing cancer. Here are suggestions from the American Cancer Society: Maintain a healthy body weight. Being obese causes the body to produce more estrogen and insulin. These hormones may promote cancer growth. Get regular exercise. Daily exercise helps you maintain a healthy weight, improve hormone levels and strengthen your immune system. The American Cancer Society recommends at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity activity or 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity exercise each week. Eat lots of plant-based foods. Also, limit how much processed and red meat you eat. Limit daily alcohol. Drink no more than one drink for women and two drinks for men each day. Quit smoking. Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Cancer, Weight Loss, Alcoholism, Hangover, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Acute Alcohol Intoxication

Health Tip: Avoid These Beverages to Fight Insomnia

Posted 16 days ago by Drugs.com

-- Traveling between time zones can create havoc with your ability to fall asleep and stay asleep. But you can improve your odds by avoiding certain beverages, the National Sleep Foundation says. Here are the foundation's suggestions for what to remove from your diet while you're traveling long distances: Caffeine – A cup of coffee can produce a stimulating effect as soon as 15 minutes after drinking it. And it can affect your sleep pattern for about six hours. So don't drink coffee at 4 p.m. and expect to fall asleep quickly at 9 p.m. Alcohol – Alcohol can initially make someone feel sleepy, but it actually affects chemicals in your body that tell you when to wake up and when to sleep. While you might fall asleep quickly after a glass of wine, you may end up feeling wide awake in the middle of the night. Soda – The carbonation in soda can cause bloating and stomach pressure, ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Caffeine, Alcohol Dependence, Fioricet, Excedrin, Alert, Alcoholism, Fiorinal, Excedrin Migraine, Hangover, Cafergot, Stay Awake, Esgic, Keep Going, Fiorinal with Codeine, Norgesic, Fioricet with Codeine, Headache Relief, Acetaminophen/Butalbital/Caffeine

Health Tip: Combat Jet Lag

Posted 24 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

-- You can't always prevent jet lag, but there are things you can do to minimize symptoms, the National Sleep Foundation says. Here's the foundation's advice: Once you get to your destination, get some rays to help sync your internal clock to the time zone. Don't nap while traveling. Avoid caffeine and alcohol. Before you go to sleep at your destination, turn off your cell phone so you won't be disturbed. Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Caffeine, Fioricet, Excedrin, Alert, Alcoholism, Fiorinal, Excedrin Migraine, Hangover, Cafergot, Stay Awake, Esgic, Keep Going, Fiorinal with Codeine, Norgesic, Fioricet with Codeine, Headache Relief, Acetaminophen/Butalbital/Caffeine, Valentine, Esgic-Plus

Pricey Wines Can Trick Your Brain

Posted 16 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 16, 2017 – If you enjoy expensive wines, keep the findings of new brain research in mind: Your pleasure may have more to do with the price of the vino than its quality. "The reward and motivation system is activated more significantly with higher prices, and apparently increases the taste experience in this way," said researcher Bernd Weber. Weber is acting director of the University of Bonn's Center for Economics and Neuroscience in Germany. He and his team had 30 study participants – average age 30 – sample wine while lying down in an MRI scanner. Their brain reactions were monitored as they sipped wine they were told was either expensive, moderately priced or inexpensive. The wines were actually identical. Previous research has shown that people's higher expectations about high-priced food affect how the brain processes taste. "However, it has so far been unclear ... Read more

Related support groups: Alcoholism, Hangover

A Little Drinking Might Lengthen Your Life: Study

Posted 15 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 15, 2017 – Light to moderate drinking can lower your overall risk of premature death and, specifically, your odds of dying from heart disease, a new study reports. Moderate drinkers – men who have one or two drinks a day, and women who have one drink a day – have a 29 percent decreased risk of heart-related death and a 22 percent reduced risk of death from any cause, compared with teetotalers, the study findings showed. This study is the latest to examine whether alcohol is good or bad for you. The researchers found that light drinkers (fewer than three drinks a week) also receive some protection – a 26 percent reduced risk of death from heart disease and a 21 percent overall lower risk of premature death, according to the report. But the relationship between alcohol and death risk is a "J-shaped curve," in which too much drinking can be detrimental to health, said ... Read more

Related support groups: Alcohol Dependence, Alcoholism, Hangover, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Acute Alcohol Intoxication

Alcohol Use, Abuse on the Rise in U.S.

Posted 9 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 9, 2017 – Rates of drinking and alcohol abuse are increasing in the United States, especially among certain groups of people, a new study suggests. "These increases constitute a public health crisis that may have been overshadowed by increases in much less prevalent substance use (marijuana, opiates and heroin) during the same period," the study authors wrote. Bridget Grant, of the U.S. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, and colleagues found that the rate of alcohol use in the United States was 65 percent in 2001-2002. By 2012-2013, it was nearly 73 percent. The rate of high-risk drinking was about 10 percent (20 million people) in 2001-2002. But by 2012-2013, the rate was nearly 13 percent (almost 30 million people). In the study, high-risk drinking was defined as four or more standard drinks on any day for women, and five or more standard drinks on ... Read more

Related support groups: Alcohol Dependence, Alcohol Withdrawal, Alcoholism, Hangover, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse, Alcoholic Gastritis, Acute Alcohol Intoxication, Alcoholic Psychosis

'12-Step' Strategy Boosts Success of Teen Drug Abuse Program

Posted 8 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 7, 2017 – Drug and alcohol abuse treatment for teens and young adults may be more effective when it includes a 12-step program similar to that used by Alcoholics Anonymous, a new report suggests. The study at Massachusetts General Hospital's Center for Addiction Medicine in Boston lasted nine months, and included 59 people aged 14 to 21. The researchers found that combining the 12-step approach with standard care led to more successful outcomes than current standard methods alone. While a well-designed drug and alcohol abuse program can benefit all adolescents, "we showed that adding a 12-step component to standard cognitive-behavioral and motivational strategies produced significantly greater reductions in substance-related consequences during and in the months following treatment," said study leader John Kelly. He directs the Recovery Research Institute at the hospital. ... Read more

Related support groups: Oxycodone, Percocet, OxyContin, Opiate Dependence, Codeine, Opiate Withdrawal, Roxicodone, Drug Dependence, Alcohol Dependence, Endocet, Cheratussin AC, Tylenol with Codeine, Percocet 10/325, Tylenol with Codeine 3, Substance Abuse, Alcoholism, Acetaminophen/Oxycodone, Roxicet, Hangover, Codeine/Promethazine

Study Links Moderate Drinking to Reduced Risk of Dementia

Posted 6 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, Aug. 6, 2017 – Moderate drinking may be associated with a reduced risk of dementia in seniors, a new study suggests. But the study authors stressed that the findings shouldn't be interpreted as a signal to drink freely. The study only found an association between some alcohol consumption and mental sharpness, not a cause-and-effect link. Researchers followed more than 1,300 adults from 1984 to 2013. They lived in a white-collar, middle- to upper-middle-class suburb in San Diego County, California. Most were white with at least some college education. Their thinking and memory (cognitive) skills were assessed every four years. Among men and women 85 and older, those who drank moderate amounts of alcohol five to seven days a week were twice as likely to show no signs of dementia than non-drinkers, according to the study in the August issue of the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease. ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alcohol Dependence, Alzheimer's Disease, Alcoholism, Hangover, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Lewy Body Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features, Alcoholic Dementia, Acute Alcohol Intoxication

Could a Little Alcohol Lower Your Diabetes Risk?

Posted 28 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 27, 2017 – That glass of wine or pint of beer you enjoy with dinner every night might come with an added benefit – a lower risk of type 2 diabetes, a new Danish study contends. The researchers found that men who had 14 drinks each week and women who had nine drinks a week appeared to have the lowest risk of type 2 diabetes, compared to nondrinkers or people who drank more heavily, said senior researcher Janne Tolstrup. People received the most benefit if they spread those drinks out during the week, rather than downing them all in one or two binges, Tolstrup added. "Drinking pattern seemed to play a role for the risk of diabetes," Tolstrup said. "Drinking frequency was important, as those who were drinking three to four times per week had lower risk as compared to those drinking only once per week – regardless of the total weekly amount." The potential protective ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Alcohol Dependence, Insulin Resistance, Pre-Diabetes, Alcoholism, Hangover, Diabetes Mellitus, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Acute Alcohol Intoxication

Binge Drinking Rates Dropping on College Campuses

Posted 27 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 27, 2017 – After years of increases in binge drinking among the college crowd, new research shows those rates have now dropped. Unfortunately, the reverse held true for young adults who did not go to college. Between 1999 and 2005, binge drinking among college students jumped from 37 percent to 45 percent. But that trend reversed itself after 2005, landing back at 37 percent by 2014, according to the analysis from the U.S. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA). Meanwhile, binge drinking rates among those who were not enrolled in college increased from 36 percent to 40 percent between 1999 and 2014. "For many years, there was an increase in the percentage of college students in national surveys who binged," said study first author Ralph Hingson, director of the division of epidemiology and prevention research at NIAAA. "We saw that up until 2005. "But ... Read more

Related support groups: Alcohol Dependence, Alcoholism, Hangover, Acute Alcohol Intoxication

Treating ADHD May Help Curb Later Drinking, Drug Problems

Posted 24 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 24, 2017 – Teens and adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder may have a lower risk of developing an alcohol or drug problem if they take medications to treat their ADHD, a new study suggests. "This study contributes to growing evidence that ADHD medication is linked to lower risk for many types of harmful behavior, including substance abuse," said study leader Patrick Quinn. "The results also highlight the importance of careful diagnosis and compliance with treatment," he added. Quinn is a postdoctoral researcher at Indiana University's department of psychological and brain sciences. For the study, the researchers looked at data from 3 million Americans with ADHD. The risk of alcohol or drug abuse was 35 percent lower among men and 31 percent lower among women who took ADHD medications, such as Adderall, Ritalin and Strattera, than among those who did not take ... Read more

Related support groups: Oxycodone, Adderall, Hydrocodone, Tramadol, Methadone, OxyContin, Fentanyl, Opiate Dependence, Morphine, Vyvanse, Codeine, Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Opana, Subutex, Concerta, Dilaudid, Ritalin, Adderall XR, Opana ER, Roxicodone

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