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High Blood Pressure in 40s a Dementia Risk for Women?

Posted 5 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 4, 2017 – Women who develop high blood pressure in their 40s could be much more vulnerable to dementia later in life, a new study suggests. That increased risk could run as high as 73 percent, the researchers reported, but the same did not hold true for men. These new findings suggest that high blood pressure can start playing a role in brain health even earlier than previously thought, said lead researcher Paola Gilsanz, a postdoctoral fellow with the Kaiser Permanente Northern California Division of Research in Oakland. Prior studies have linked high blood pressure with dementia, but "it wasn't clear if hypertension before one's 50s was a risk factor," Gilsanz said. A healthy circulatory system is key to a health brain, said Keith Fargo, director of scientific programs and outreach for the Alzheimer's Association. "The brain is a very metabolically active organ in the ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Diagnosis and Investigation, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Lewy Body Dementia, Alcoholic Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features

Failing Sense of Smell Tied to Dementia Risk

Posted 29 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 29, 2017 – Older adults who've lost their sense of smell appear to have an increased risk of dementia, a new study suggests. The long-term study included nearly 3,000 participants, aged 57 to 85, who were tested on their ability to identify five common odors. At least four of the five odors were correctly identified by 78 percent of the participants, the researchers found. In addition, 14 percent identified three of the odors, 5 percent identified only two of the odors, 2 percent identified only one, and 1 percent could not identify any of the odors. Five years after the test, the participants who weren't able to identify at least four of the five odors were more than twice as likely to have dementia, compared to those with a normal sense of smell, the researchers said. Nearly all of the participants who couldn't identify a single odor had been diagnosed with dementia, ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia, Alcoholic Dementia, Drug-Induced Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features

High, Low Levels of Magnesium Linked to Dementia Risk

Posted 20 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 20, 2017 – Having magnesium levels that are too high or too low may put you at risk for Alzheimer's and other dementias, Dutch researchers report. In a study of more than 9,500 men and women, the highest or lowest levels of magnesium appeared to increase the chances for dementia by as much as 30 percent. "At this moment, magnesium levels are not routinely measured in daily clinical practice," said lead researcher Dr. Brenda Kieboom, of Erasmus University Medical Center in Rotterdam. "If our study results are replicated, magnesium levels could be used to screen for dementia, especially in people at risk for low magnesium levels." But she cautioned that "we cannot prove that low or high magnesium causes dementia on the basis of our data. For that, we need studies to see if supplements will reduce the risk." Kieboom said she also wants to study whether low magnesium ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Diagnosis and Investigation, Lewy Body Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features, Alcoholic Dementia

Dementia Care: A Huge Financial Burden for U.S. Families

Posted 22 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 22, 2017 – Caring for a family member with a neurological disorder such as dementia is vastly more expensive than caring for a senior who is dementia-free, a new study finds. The average yearly cost of caring for a dementia-free senior is roughly $137,000. But the price tag rises to $321,000 for care of those struggling with dementia. And about 70 percent of that yearly cost ultimately falls on the shoulders of the family members rather than insurance, the researchers said. The rest of the cost typically splits evenly between Medicare and Medicaid. "A lot of people, I think, believe that Medicare will pay for their long-term care," said lead author Eric Jutkowitz, an assistant professor at Brown University's School of Public Health. "That's not the case. Private long-term care insurance may help, but benefits can be exhausted and few families have policies. For a disease ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia, Alcoholic Dementia, Drug-Induced Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features

'Confusion' Complicates Hospitalization of Elderly

Posted 19 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Aug. 18, 2017 – Older adults with confusion are more likely to remain in the hospital longer once they are admitted, and are more likely to die, a new study finds. "People with confusion – or cognitive spectrum disorders – make up over one-third of the population over 65 [in the U.K.] who are admitted as an emergency to the hospital, and half of patients over the age of 85 years," said the study's lead researcher, Prof. Emma Reynish. These patients seem to do badly, and are at an increased risk of a hospital stay nearly two weeks longer than those without confusion, said Reynish, chair of dementia studies at the University of Stirling in Scotland. "It's unclear whether this is as a result of the care that they are given or the disease process itself, or a combination of both," she said. Researchers looked at data from more than 10,000 emergency-admitted hospital patients, 65 ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Agitated State, Mild Cognitive Impairment, ICU Agitation, Alcoholic Dementia, Drug-Induced Dementia

Blood Pressure Fluctuations Tied to Dementia Risk in Study

Posted 7 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 7, 2017 – If your blood pressure varies from day-to-day, you may be at higher risk for dementia or Alzheimer's disease, new research from Japan suggests. People whose systolic blood pressure (the top reading) fluctuated from day-to-day were more than twice as likely to develop any type of dementia or Alzheimer's disease compared to those with more stable day-to-day blood pressure, the researchers found. And the study – which was based on home-monitorings – also reported that the participants were nearly three times more likely to develop vascular dementia, caused by hardening of the arteries. "Our main findings suggest that increased day-to-day blood pressure variability, independent of average home blood pressure, is a significant risk factor for the development of all-cause dementia, vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease in the general elderly Japanese population," ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Ischemic Stroke, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Lewy Body Dementia, Hypertensive Congestive Heart Failure, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Alcoholic Dementia

Study Links Moderate Drinking to Reduced Risk of Dementia

Posted 6 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, Aug. 6, 2017 – Moderate drinking may be associated with a reduced risk of dementia in seniors, a new study suggests. But the study authors stressed that the findings shouldn't be interpreted as a signal to drink freely. The study only found an association between some alcohol consumption and mental sharpness, not a cause-and-effect link. Researchers followed more than 1,300 adults from 1984 to 2013. They lived in a white-collar, middle- to upper-middle-class suburb in San Diego County, California. Most were white with at least some college education. Their thinking and memory (cognitive) skills were assessed every four years. Among men and women 85 and older, those who drank moderate amounts of alcohol five to seven days a week were twice as likely to show no signs of dementia than non-drinkers, according to the study in the August issue of the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease. ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alcohol Dependence, Alzheimer's Disease, Alcoholism, Hangover, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Acute Alcohol Intoxication, Lewy Body Dementia, Alcoholic Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features

Traveling With Dementia: Tips for Family Caregivers

Posted 3 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 2, 2017 – Traveling with a loved one who has dementia requires special preparation. The Alzheimer's Foundation of America has some advice. "Traveling is a fun and enjoyable way to reenergize your body and mind. It can be beneficial to people living with dementia and their family caregivers under the proper circumstances," said Charles Fuschillo Jr., foundation president and CEO. "Before going on a trip, there are important steps family caregivers should take to ensure that their loved ones will be safe, comfortable and able to make the journey," he added in a foundation news release. First you should talk with the person's doctor to find out if travel is recommended or safe. In the early stages of dementia, travel may still be enjoyable. But it can become overwhelming as dementia progresses, the foundation said. When deciding how and where to travel, make choices that ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia, Head Imaging, Dementia with Depressive Features, Alcoholic Dementia

Moving From 'Stroke Belt' Doesn't Undo Higher Dementia Risk

Posted 31 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 31, 2017 – Health problems for people born in the so-called Stroke Belt of the United States also include a higher risk of developing dementia – even if they move elsewhere, a new study suggests. Researchers who calculated data on thousands of adults living in northern California found dementia risk was roughly 26 percent higher for those born in nine states, nearly all in the Southeast. Blacks, in particular, were at an increased risk for dementia if they started life in: Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Tennessee, South Carolina and West Virginia, said study author Paola Gilsanz. "We already know that living in certain states in the U.S. is associated with poorer health outcomes," said Gilsanz, a research fellow at Kaiser Permanente Northern California division of research in Oakland. "This study contributes to a growing body of evidence that ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Ischemic Stroke, High Cholesterol, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Transient Ischemic Attack, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Alcoholic Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features

Targeting 9 Risk Factors Could Prevent 1 in 3 Dementia Cases: Study

Posted 20 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 20, 2017 – One-third of dementia cases worldwide might be prevented by paying attention to nine risk factors throughout life, researchers say. These measures include: staying in school until you're at least over the age of 15; reducing hearing loss, obesity and high blood pressure in mid-life (ages 45 to 65); and reducing smoking, depression, physical inactivity, social isolation and diabetes in later life (65 and older). Taking care of these risk factors would possibly prevent 35 percent of dementia cases, the study findings suggested. In comparison, targeting the major genetic risk factor – known as ApoE – would prevent less than one in 10 dementia cases (7 percent), the study authors said. The three risk factors that could potentially make the most difference in preventing dementia include: staying in school (which would reduce dementia cases by 8 percent); reducing ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, High Blood Pressure, Obesity, Diabetes, Type 2, Major Depressive Disorder, Hypertension, Smoking, Dementia, Smoking Cessation, Alzheimer's Disease, Insulin Resistance, Dysthymia, Pre-Diabetes, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Diabetes Mellitus, Hearing Loss, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Lewy Body Dementia, Alcoholic Dementia

Boozing Can Age You Right Down to Your Cells

Posted 26 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, June 26, 2017 – The more you booze it up, the more your cells age, increasing your risk for age-related health problems like heart disease, diabetes, cancer and dementia, a new study suggests. Researchers studied 134 alcoholics between the ages of 41 and 85 and a control group of people in the same age group who weren't alcoholics. DNA samples revealed that the alcoholics had shortened telomeres. "Telomeres, the protein caps on the ends of human chromosomes, are markers of aging and overall health," said study leader Dr. Naruhisa Yamaki, a clinical fellow at the Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine in Japan. Every time a cell replicates, a tiny bit of telomere is lost, so they get shorter with age. As time passes, that leaves chromosomes less protected so cells may be unable to function properly. But some people have shorter telomeres for reasons other than aging. "Our ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Cancer, Heart Disease, Dementia, Alcohol Dependence, Alzheimer's Disease, Alcohol Withdrawal, Alcoholism, Pre-Diabetes, Hangover, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Diabetes Mellitus, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Ischemic Heart Disease, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Alcoholic Cardiomyopathy, Acute Alcohol Intoxication, Alcoholic Dementia, Alcoholic Psychosis

Even Moderate Drinking May Dull the Aging Brain

Posted 7 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, June 6, 2017 – People who drink at even moderate levels may see some of their mental skills slip faster as they age, a new study suggests. The researchers found that those who regularly drank alcohol showed greater brain shrinkage than non-drinkers by old age. They also lost more of their language "fluency" – a measure of memory and thinking skills. And, the effects were seen even among people who drank "moderately" – roughly four to seven drinks a week, the researchers found. The findings do not prove that alcohol was to blame. But experts said they add to evidence that moderate drinking is not as healthful as many like to believe. "People should be skeptical of the idea that it's actually healthy, and treat alcohol with respect," said Tim Stockwell, director of the Center for Addictions Research at the University of Victoria, in British Columbia, Canada. Stockwell, who was ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alcohol Dependence, Alzheimer's Disease, Alcoholism, Hangover, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Acute Alcohol Intoxication, Lewy Body Dementia, Alcoholic Dementia

Alzheimer's Deaths Jump 55 Percent: CDC

Posted 25 May 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, May 25, 2017 – As more baby boomers age, deaths from Alzheimer's disease have jumped 55 percent, and in a quarter of those cases the heavy burden of caregiving has fallen on loved ones, U.S. health officials report. "Alzheimer's disease is a public health problem that affects not only people with Alzheimer's disease, but also the people who provide care to them, which is often family members," said report author Christopher Taylor. He's an epidemiologist at the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. The number of Americans over 65 is growing rapidly, and age is the greatest risk factor for Alzheimer's disease, Taylor noted. One Alzheimer's expert described the news as dire. "This is an enormous problem that is only growing, it's only going to get worse – we are staring at a tsunami of Alzheimer's disease," said Keith Fargo, director of ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Lewy Body Dementia, Alcoholic Dementia

Can Air Pollution Heighten Alzheimer's Risk?

Posted 1 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 1, 2017 – Air pollution may cause more than just lung disease: New research suggests that if tiny particles in the air from power plants and cars are inhaled, they might also invade the brain, increasing the risk for dementia. "Although the link between air pollution and Alzheimer's disease is a new scientific frontier, we now have evidence that air pollution, like tobacco, is dangerous to the aging brain," said study co-senior author Caleb Finch. He's with the University of Southern California's (USC) Leonard Davis School of Gerontology. For the study, the USC scientists collected samples of air particles with technology designed by university engineers. The researchers used the technology to expose female mice to air pollution. "Our state-of-the-art aerosol technologies, called particle concentrators, essentially take the air of a typical urban area and convert it to ... Read more

Related support groups: Cough, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Bronchitis, Dementia, Dyspnea, Alzheimer's Disease, Cough and Nasal Congestion, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Bronchiectasis, Respiratory Tract Disease, Croup, Lewy Body Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features, Reversible Airways Disease, Alcoholic Dementia, Drug-Induced Dementia

Antipsychotic Drugs May Up Risk of Early Death in Alzheimer's Patients

Posted 27 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 27, 2016 – Taking antipsychotic drugs significantly increases the risk of premature death among Alzheimer's patients, a new study indicates. Researchers analyzed data from almost 58,000 people in Finland diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease between 2005 and 2011. Slightly more than a quarter of the Alzheimer's patients took antipsychotic drugs. The study found they had a 60 percent higher risk of death than those who didn't take the drugs. The risk of death was highest when patients first started taking antipsychotics, but the increased risk persisted with long-term use of the drugs. Patients who took two or more antipsychotic drugs at the same time were nearly twice as likely to die early than those who took one antipsychotic. Although the study found an association between antipsychotic drug use and a higher risk of dying, it cannot prove a cause-and-effect link. But, the ... Read more

Related support groups: Seroquel, Abilify, Lithium, Latuda, Geodon, Risperidone, Zyprexa, Dementia, Saphris, Seroquel XR, Quetiapine, Risperdal, Agitation, Olanzapine, Alzheimer's Disease, Invega, Haldol, Rexulti, Clozapine, Haloperidol

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