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Health Tip: Better Sleep, a Better Life

Posted 27 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Sleep quality affects the quality of your life, both physically and emotionally. The National Sleep Foundation says getting enough quality sleep helps you: Improve your ability to learn and focus. Feel happier and less cranky. Improve productivity. Feel less hungry. Improve your risk of infection and chronic illness. Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Nightmares, Drowsiness, Sleep Apnea, Narcolepsy, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Night Terrors, Insomnia - Stimulant-Associated, Hypersomnia, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Jet Lag, Alcohol-Induced Sleep Disorder, REM Sleep Behavior Disorder

Need More Zzzzz's?

Posted 25 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 24, 2017 – A good night's sleep is often elusive, but there are things you can do to boost the odds of getting some quality shuteye, sleep experts say. The first is to have regular bed and wake times, according to NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital sleep doctors Dr. Daniel Barone and Dr. Andrew Westwood. The doctors suggested going to sleep at the same time each night and waking up at the same time each morning, even on weekends and vacation days. That's because changes between workdays and days off may impair your sleep and how you feel during the daytime. Avoid caffeine in the late afternoon and evening, they advised. Instead of coffee, tea, cola and chocolate, choose water, seltzer, unsweetened decaffeinated herbal tea and other caffeine-free beverages. It's also important to eat a healthy diet and be physically active. "Regular exercise and maintaining a healthy diet that ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Nightmares, Caffeine, Fioricet, Excedrin, Alert, Sleep Apnea, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Fiorinal, Excedrin Migraine, Cafergot, Esgic, Keep Going, Fiorinal with Codeine, Norgesic, Headache Relief, Valentine, Fioricet with Codeine

Your DNA May Determine How You Handle the Time Change

Posted 13 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, March 11, 2017 – Some people have more trouble adjusting to daylight saving time than others and genes may be the reason why, says an expert on sleep/wake patterns. The time change occurs 2 a.m. Sunday morning when clocks "spring ahead" one hour. "It is likely that advancing our clocks in the spring would more affect owls, those individuals who tend to stay awake later at night and consequently wake up later in the morning," said Dr. Joseph Takahashi. "Less affected are the larks, those individuals who tend to wake up early and go to sleep earlier," he added. Takahashi is chairman of neuroscience at UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. "Since being an owl or a lark is in large part genetically influenced, the best way to deal with daylight saving time is to be self-aware of your chronotype (early versus late awakening and sleeping) and to realize that advancing your ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Sleep Apnea, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Alcohol-Induced Sleep Disorder

Genes Plus Erratic Sleep May Raise Odds for Obesity

Posted 10 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 10, 2017 – Yet more evidence of a link between poor sleep and excess weight: A new study finds that people who are genetically prone to obesity are more likely to be overweight if they have unusual sleep habits. "These data show that in people with high genetic risk for obesity, sleeping for too short or too long a time, napping during the day, and shift work appears to have a fairly substantial adverse influence on body weight," said researcher Dr. Jason Gill of the University of Glasgow, Scotland. Gill, who is with the university's Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, and colleagues looked at statistics on nearly 120,000 people in the United Kingdom. The investigators said they found that sleeping fewer than 7 hours a night or more than 9 hours a night boosts the risk of obesity among those who are especially prone to it because of their genes. Among those ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Nightmares, Drowsiness, Sleep Apnea, Narcolepsy, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Insomnia - Stimulant-Associated, Hypersomnia, Diagnosis and Investigation, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Non-24-Hour Sleep Wake Disorder, REM Sleep Behavior Disorder, Alcohol-Induced Sleep Disorder

How to Keep a Spring in Your Step With Daylight Saving Time

Posted 9 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 9, 2017 – Clocks will spring ahead one hour with the time change on Sunday morning, but medical experts have plenty of advice on how to weather that lost hour of sleep. "'Gaining' an hour in the fall is much easier for our bodies than 'losing' an hour in the spring," said Dr. Praveen Rudraraju, medical director of the Center for Sleep Medicine at Northern Westchester Hospital in Mount Kisco, N.Y. Starting a few days before the time change, people can prepare themselves by going to bed 15 or 20 minutes earlier each night, according to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. But it can still be hard to adjust to the switch afterwards, sleep specialists said. "In fact, it may take some people up to a week to get used to the new time change," Rudraraju said. "Though it may be tempting to stay up an extra hour, one of the best ways to fight the effects of daylight saving ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Fatigue, Melatonin, Sleep Apnea, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Bio-Melatonin, Melatonin Time Release, Jet Lag, Calcium Carbonate/melatonin/pyridoxine, VesPro Melatonin, Health Aid Melatonin, SGard, Alcohol-Induced Sleep Disorder

Health Tip: Short on Sleep?

Posted 22 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

-- It may be tough to find enough hours to get everything checked off of your daily to-do list. But giving up sleep to get more done may do more harm than good. The National Sleep Foundation explains how insufficient sleep affects you: Reduces cognitive function, making it more difficult to remember, focus, learn new things, solve problems and make decisions. Increases body's reaction to stress. Brings on feelings of irritability and moodiness. Reduces reaction time, affecting school or work performance and raising your risk of a car accident. Increases risk of developing high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease. Makes you more susceptible to illness. Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Nightmares, Drowsiness, Sleep Apnea, Narcolepsy, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Insomnia - Stimulant-Associated, Hypersomnia, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Jet Lag, Alcohol-Induced Sleep Disorder

Sleep: The Great Motivator

Posted 3 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Feb. 3, 2017 – If you really want to follow through on your New Year's resolutions, make sure you get enough sleep. That's the advice of Michigan sleep specialist Dr. Cathy Goldstein. Adequate sleep is a key component when trying to achieve goals – whether it's healthier eating, more exercise, quitting smoking, improving relationships or getting ahead at work, she said. "We definitely take sleep as a luxury; it's not," said Goldstein, an assistant professor of neurology in the University of Michigan Sleep Disorders Centers. People who don't get enough sleep are more likely to make poor food choices and to eat more, Goldstein said in a university news release. They're also less likely to feel motivated to exercise or stick to their no-smoking plan; more likely to be in a bad mood; and they're probably less productive at work, she said. Goldstein advised getting seven to eight ... Read more

Related support groups: Xanax, Obesity, Sleep Disorders, Klonopin, Insomnia, Clonazepam, Ativan, Valium, Fatigue, Smoking, Lorazepam, Alprazolam, Diazepam, Smoking Cessation, Temazepam, Librium, Drowsiness, Restoril, Xanax XR, Sleep Apnea

The ABCs of Good Zzzzzs

Posted 31 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 31, 2017 – In case you don't know what makes for healthy sleep habits, a U.S.-based expert panel has defined them for you in a new report. The key indicators include: sleeping at least 85 percent of the total time spent in bed; falling asleep within 30 minutes or less; waking up no more than once a night; and being awake for 20 minutes or less after initially falling asleep. The National Sleep Foundation report also outlined research needed to identify and describe more indicators of good sleep quality among people of all ages. "The National Sleep Foundation's guidelines on sleep duration, and now quality, make sense of it all – providing consumers with the resources needed to understand their sleep," said co-author Max Hirshkowitz in a foundation news release. He is chairman of the sleep foundation. Foundation researchers said that 27 percent of people take longer than ... Read more

Related support groups: Xanax, Sleep Disorders, Klonopin, Insomnia, Clonazepam, Ativan, Valium, Fatigue, Lorazepam, Alprazolam, Diazepam, Nightmares, Temazepam, Librium, Drowsiness, Restoril, Xanax XR, Sleep Apnea, Oxazepam, Shift Work Sleep Disorder

Health Tip: Make Sleep a Priority

Posted 17 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Are you sabotaging your own attempts to get more shuteye? The National Sleep Foundation suggests: Identify and correct any unhealthy sleep habits. Instead of checking your smartphone just before bed, do something relaxing, such as meditating. Prepare your bed well before bedtime. Wash and change bedsheets regularly. Read more

Related support groups: Xanax, Sleep Disorders, Klonopin, Insomnia, Clonazepam, Ativan, Ambien, Valium, Fatigue, Lorazepam, Alprazolam, BuSpar, Diazepam, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Nightmares, Zolpidem, Buspirone, Melatonin, Temazepam

Sleep Loss Tied to Changes in Gut Bacteria

Posted 11 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 9, 2016 – Getting too little sleep alters the balance of bacteria in the gut, a change that's linked to certain metabolic conditions, including obesity and type 2 diabetes, new research shows. For the study, European researchers limited the sleep of nine healthy men who were a normal weight to examine how sleep loss affects the number of types of bacteria in the gut. For two days in a row, the men slept only four hours a night. The study showed the diversity of gut bacteria didn't change but sleep loss did alter the balance of the existing groups of bacteria. The study results were published recently in the journal Molecular Metabolism. These changes parallel some of the differences seen when obese people have been compared with normal-weight people in other studies, senior study author Dr. Jonathan Cedernaes, said in a journal news release. He's with Uppsala University in ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Drowsiness, Gastrointestinal Disorders, Sleep Apnea, Narcolepsy, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Night Terrors, Insomnia - Stimulant-Associated, Hypersomnia, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Alcohol-Induced Sleep Disorder, REM Sleep Behavior Disorder

Missing Just 1 Hour of Sleep May Double Drivers' Crash Risk

Posted 6 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 6, 2016 – Missing just an hour or two of sleep at night nearly doubles your chances of a car crash the next day, a new report suggests. And getting behind the wheel after only four to five hours of shut-eye quadruples that risk. That's comparable to driving with a blood alcohol concentration considered legally drunk, the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety researchers warned. "This is the first study to actually quantify the relationship between lack of sleep and the risk of being involved in a motor vehicle crash," said report author Brian Tefft, who added that the risk of sleep-impaired driving has long been "underestimated and underappreciated." The U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) recognizes the problem and will soon issue a national strategy to combat drowsy driving, said Bryan Thomas, the federal agency's communications director. "Not ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Drowsiness, Sleep Apnea, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Hypersomnia, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Alcohol-Induced Sleep Disorder, REM Sleep Behavior Disorder

Web-Based Help for Insomnia Shows Promise

Posted 30 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 30, 2016 – People find help for all sorts of maladies online. Now, insomnia might be one of them. A web-based interactive program may help chronically sleepless individuals get needed shuteye without taking medication or spending time on a therapist's couch, a new study suggests. The six-week program uses cognitive behavior therapy techniques – a standard treatment for insomnia – to help reset sleep patterns, the researchers said. People who participated in the program "experienced significant and clinically meaningful improvements in their sleep, compared to those who were given online patient education," said lead researcher Lee Ritterband. Moreover, the results are "similar to outcomes reported in trials that included face-to-face cognitive behavior therapy," said Ritterband. He is a professor at the University of Virginia School of Medicine's department of ... Read more

Related support groups: Xanax, Sleep Disorders, Klonopin, Insomnia, Clonazepam, Ativan, Valium, Fatigue, Lorazepam, Alprazolam, Diazepam, Temazepam, Librium, Drowsiness, Restoril, Xanax XR, Sleep Apnea, Oxazepam, Halcion, Serax

Lack of Sleep Takes Big Bite Out of World Economies

Posted 30 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 30, 2016 – Too little shut-eye can have far-reaching effects – even financial ones, a new report says. Reduced productivity and an increased risk of death linked to lack of sleep among U.S. workers cost the nation's economy as much as $411 billion a year. That's more than 2 percent of the country's gross domestic product (GDP), the report revealed. Lack of sleep leads to the loss of about 1.2 million working days a year in the United States. Sleep deprivation-related productivity losses are caused by employees missing work or working at less than ideal levels, said the study authors from the RAND Corp., a nonprofit research organization. Compared to someone who sleeps an average of seven to nine hours a night, the risk of death is 13 percent higher for those who sleep less than six hours a night, and 7 percent higher for those who sleep six to seven hours a night, the ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Nightmares, Sleep Apnea, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Insomnia - Stimulant-Associated, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Alcohol-Induced Sleep Disorder

Health Tip: Making the Transition to Sleep

Posted 6 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

-- It can be difficult to wind down from a busy day and prepare for sleep, as your body looks for cues that it's time to wind down. The National Sleep Foundation suggests: Before bed, dim the lights. This will help your body release more of the sleep-inducing hormone melatonin. Step away from smartphones, tablets and other electronics that can emit bright light. Finish all stimulating activities well before bedtime. Drop the thermostat to 60 to 68 degrees Fahrenheit at bedtime, which should help prepare you for sleep. Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Nightmares, Drowsiness, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Night Terrors, Insomnia - Stimulant-Associated, Hypersomnia, Alcohol-Induced Sleep Disorder

Health Tip: Avoid These 5 Pre-Bedtime Don'ts

Posted 2 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Your habits just before you slip into bed could be sabotaging your night of sleep. The National Sleep Foundation says do NOT: Take any over-the-counter medications that contain pseudoephedrine, found in common cold medicines, which can keep you awake. Opt for a nighttime formula that may help you feel drowsy. Text, watch TV or spend time on the computer shortly before bed. Take a hot shower or bath just before bed. It's best to do so about an hour before you plan to sleep, as that gives your body temperature time to drop again. Indulge in a greasy, fattening, salty bedtime snack, which can be stimulating and trigger nightmares. Drink caffeine beyond the morning, as it can stay in your system for as long as 12 hours. Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Sta-D, Caffeine, Pseudoephedrine, Fioricet, Excedrin, Alert, Claritin-D, Mucinex D, DayQuil, Fiorinal, Allegra-D, Excedrin Migraine, Bromfed DM, Cafergot, Tylenol Cold, Advil Cold and Sinus, Keep Going

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