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Alcohol-Induced Sleep Disorder News

Web-Based Help for Insomnia Shows Promise

Posted 4 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 30, 2016 – People find help for all sorts of maladies online. Now, insomnia might be one of them. A web-based interactive program may help chronically sleepless individuals get needed shuteye without taking medication or spending time on a therapist's couch, a new study suggests. The six-week program uses cognitive behavior therapy techniques – a standard treatment for insomnia – to help reset sleep patterns, the researchers said. People who participated in the program "experienced significant and clinically meaningful improvements in their sleep, compared to those who were given online patient education," said lead researcher Lee Ritterband. Moreover, the results are "similar to outcomes reported in trials that included face-to-face cognitive behavior therapy," said Ritterband. He is a professor at the University of Virginia School of Medicine's department of ... Read more

Related support groups: Xanax, Insomnia, Sleep Disorders, Klonopin, Clonazepam, Ativan, Valium, Fatigue, Lorazepam, Alprazolam, Diazepam, Temazepam, Sleep Apnea, Librium, Restoril, Xanax XR, Oxazepam, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Halcion, Serax

Lack of Sleep Takes Big Bite Out of World Economies

Posted 4 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 30, 2016 – Too little shut-eye can have far-reaching effects – even financial ones, a new report says. Reduced productivity and an increased risk of death linked to lack of sleep among U.S. workers cost the nation's economy as much as $411 billion a year. That's more than 2 percent of the country's gross domestic product (GDP), the report revealed. Lack of sleep leads to the loss of about 1.2 million working days a year in the United States. Sleep deprivation-related productivity losses are caused by employees missing work or working at less than ideal levels, said the study authors from the RAND Corp., a nonprofit research organization. Compared to someone who sleeps an average of seven to nine hours a night, the risk of death is 13 percent higher for those who sleep less than six hours a night, and 7 percent higher for those who sleep six to seven hours a night, the ... Read more

Related support groups: Insomnia, Sleep Disorders, Fatigue, Nightmares, Sleep Apnea, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Insomnia - Stimulant-Associated, Alcohol-Induced Sleep Disorder

Health Tip: Making the Transition to Sleep

Posted 6 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

-- It can be difficult to wind down from a busy day and prepare for sleep, as your body looks for cues that it's time to wind down. The National Sleep Foundation suggests: Before bed, dim the lights. This will help your body release more of the sleep-inducing hormone melatonin. Step away from smartphones, tablets and other electronics that can emit bright light. Finish all stimulating activities well before bedtime. Drop the thermostat to 60 to 68 degrees Fahrenheit at bedtime, which should help prepare you for sleep. Read more

Related support groups: Insomnia, Sleep Disorders, Fatigue, Nightmares, Night Terrors, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Drowsiness, Insomnia - Stimulant-Associated, Hypersomnia, Alcohol-Induced Sleep Disorder

Health Tip: Avoid These 5 Pre-Bedtime Don'ts

Posted 2 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Your habits just before you slip into bed could be sabotaging your night of sleep. The National Sleep Foundation says do NOT: Take any over-the-counter medications that contain pseudoephedrine, found in common cold medicines, which can keep you awake. Opt for a nighttime formula that may help you feel drowsy. Text, watch TV or spend time on the computer shortly before bed. Take a hot shower or bath just before bed. It's best to do so about an hour before you plan to sleep, as that gives your body temperature time to drop again. Indulge in a greasy, fattening, salty bedtime snack, which can be stimulating and trigger nightmares. Drink caffeine beyond the morning, as it can stay in your system for as long as 12 hours. Read more

Related support groups: Insomnia, Sleep Disorders, Fatigue, Sta-D, Caffeine, Fioricet, Pseudoephedrine, Excedrin, Claritin-D, Alert, Mucinex D, DayQuil, Fiorinal, Allegra-D, Excedrin Migraine, Cafergot, Bromfed DM, Tylenol Cold, Advil Cold and Sinus, Actifed

Brain Relies on Two Timekeepers for Sleep

Posted 12 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Aug. 12, 2016 – Both an internal "clock" and an internal "hourglass" affect how different parts of your brain respond to sleep deprivation, a new study shows. The Belgian researchers said these findings could eventually aid in the understanding of sleep disorders, and help folks who work night shifts or those with jet lag. The study involved 33 healthy young people who volunteered to stay awake for 42 hours and have their mental sharpness tracked along the way. Sleep scientists from the University of Liege used MRI scans to chart the volunteers' brain activity as they performed tests of attention and reaction time. Not surprisingly, their performances dulled as their sleep deprivation worsened. But the brain scans revealed a complicated interaction between two basic biological processes: the body's central "circadian rhythm," which pushes people to be awake and active during ... Read more

Related support groups: Insomnia, Sleep Disorders, Fatigue, Nightmares, Sleep Apnea, Night Terrors, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Narcolepsy, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Sleep Paralysis, Drowsiness, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Cataplexy, Insomnia - Stimulant-Associated, Hypersomnia, Non-24-Hour Sleep Wake Disorder, REM Sleep Behavior Disorder, Jet Lag, Alcohol-Induced Sleep Disorder

Could Slight Brain Zap During Sleep Boost Memory?

Posted 28 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 28, 2016 – Stimulating a targeted area of the brain with small doses of weak electricity while you sleep may enhance your ability to remember what you learned the night before, new research finds. The new procedure is called transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS). "We work with the brain, that's really unique about what we do. We listen in to brain activity and can boost what the brain already wants to do," said the study's senior author, Flavio Frohlich. He's an assistant professor of psychiatry at the Neuroscience Center at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. While you sleep your brain is not idle, but is actively storing things you learned during the day for later use. Stimulating the brain enhances what the brain is already doing naturally, Frohlich said. During sleep, electrical brain activity oscillates, and can be seen as waves on an ... Read more

Related support groups: Insomnia, Sleep Disorders, Fatigue, Sleep Apnea, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Diagnosis and Investigation, Alcohol-Induced Sleep Disorder, Jet Lag, Head Imaging

Health Tip: Considering a Sleep Study?

Posted 21 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

-- If you can't find a way to get to sleep, a sleep study may help you figure out what's behind your insomnia. The National Sleep Foundation says a sleep study may help if: Your doctor can't figure out what's causing your sleep problems. You've tried treatments for sleep issues without success. You have significant daytime drowsiness or chronic snoring. You wake up often throughout the night, or have trouble falling asleep. Read more

Related support groups: Insomnia, Sleep Disorders, Fatigue, Nightmares, Sleep Apnea, Night Terrors, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Narcolepsy, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Drowsiness, Sleep Paralysis, Cataplexy, Insomnia - Stimulant-Associated, Hypersomnia, Non-24-Hour Sleep Wake Disorder, Alcohol-Induced Sleep Disorder, REM Sleep Behavior Disorder

Sleep Disorders 6 Times Higher Among Veterans

Posted 20 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 20, 2016 – Sleep disorders are six times more likely among American military veterans than in the general population, a new study finds. And veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) seem to have the highest rates, the researchers said. The research involved more than 9.7 million veterans treated by the Veterans Health Administration system between 2000 and 2010. The majority (93 percent) of these military service members were men. Slightly more than 750,000 were diagnosed with at least one sleep disorder, the study authors said. Over the course of 11 years, the investigators found that the rate of sleep disorders rose from less than 1 percent to nearly 6 percent. Sleep disorders were most common among veterans who had experienced combat and those with PTSD. "Veterans with PTSD had a very high sleep disorder prevalence of 16 percent, the highest among the ... Read more

Related support groups: Insomnia, Sleep Disorders, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Fatigue, Nightmares, Sleep Apnea, Night Terrors, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Narcolepsy, Sleep Paralysis, Drowsiness, Cataplexy, Insomnia - Stimulant-Associated, Hypersomnia, Alcohol-Induced Sleep Disorder

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