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Acute Coronary Syndrome News

Take Heart, Coffee Lovers, Morning Joe May Help Your Ticker

Posted 13 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 13, 2017 – Coffee fiends, rejoice: Every cup of joe you guzzle could drive down your risk for heart problems, a new preliminary study suggests. "Drinking that cup of coffee that you love may be associated with decreased risk of stroke, heart failure and coronary heart disease," said lead researcher Laura Stevens. She's a data scientist for the American Heart Association's Institute for Precision Cardiovascular Medicine in Dallas. Each cup of coffee consumed a week could decrease your risk of heart failure by 7 percent, stroke by 8 percent and heart disease by 5 percent, according to a sophisticated analysis of data from long-term heart studies. In a more surprising finding, the research also suggested that red meat might be linked to lower risk of heart failure and stroke, said Stevens, who is also a doctoral student at the University of Colorado School of Medicine in ... Read more

Related support groups: Ischemic Stroke, Heart Failure, Congestive Heart Failure, Transient Ischemic Attack, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Left Ventricular Dysfunction, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Thromboembolic Stroke Prophylaxis, Acute Coronary Syndrome

Do E-Cigarettes Damage Blood Vessels?

Posted 11 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Sept. 11, 2017 – Nicotine in e-cigarettes may cause stiffened arteries, which can lead to an increased risk for heart attack and stroke, a small Swedish study suggests. With the dramatic increase in e-cigarette use ("vaping") over the past few years, questions have arisen about their safety. And while many people think the devices are harmless, especially compared with regular cigarettes, little is known about long-term effects of these devices, according to lead researcher Magnus Lundback, from the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm. "Increased arterial stiffness has previously been demonstrated following exposure to conventional cigarettes," said Lundback, who is a research leader and clinical registrar at the Danderyd University Hospital. "We think that chronic exposure to e-cigarettes with nicotine may lead to stiffer arteries and, in the long run, an increased risk of ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Nicotine, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Nicorette, Nicoderm CQ, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Nicotrol Inhaler, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Acute Coronary Syndrome, Commit, Habitrol, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Nicorelief, Nicorette DS, Nicotrol NS, ProStep, Nicotrol TD

Sleepless Nights Do No Favors for Your Heart

Posted 30 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 30, 2017 – Poor sleep won't simply leave you bleary-eyed. It's also linked with stroke and reduced blood supply to the heart, a new study suggests. "Poor sleep" includes too short or too long sleep, difficulty falling asleep and difficulty maintaining sleep, said lead researcher Dr. Nobuo Sasaki. "Poor sleep is associated with cardiovascular diseases ... but the kind of sleep disturbances that are most risky is not well documented," said Sasaki, of the Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Casualty Council in Japan. The researchers set out to investigate sleep problems linked to heart attack and angina (coronary artery disease), and stroke. Coronary artery disease is caused by narrowed heart arteries. This means less blood and oxygen reach the heart, raising the risk for heart attack and chest pain known as angina, according to the American Heart Association. The observational study ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Lisinopril, Fatigue, Amlodipine, Losartan, Ischemic Stroke, Heart Attack, Benicar, Diovan, Diltiazem, Norvasc, Verapamil, Ramipril, Transient Ischemic Attack, Nifedipine, Valsartan, Enalapril, Cozaar, Cardizem

Which Heart Bypass Surgery Works Best?

Posted 17 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 17, 2017 – Five years after heart bypass surgery, patients whose operation was done using a heart-lung pump lived longer than those whose surgeons didn't use the device, a new study finds. Since the 1990s, two different approaches have been commonly used by heart surgeons to perform coronary artery bypass graft operations. Coronary artery bypass creates new routes for blood to flow to the heart because old routes are blocked by plaque in the artery. A piece of blood vessel is taken from another area of the body (often the leg) and used to "bypass" a blocked vessel going to the heart, according to the U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. The two different ways to do this surgery have been referred to as "on-pump," assisted by a heart-lung machine, or "off-pump." Which procedure produces better results has been controversial, the researchers said. "The ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Acute Coronary Syndrome, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders, Acute Coronary Syndrome - Prophylaxis, Cardiothoracic Surgery, Coronary Arteriography

Opioids a Threat to Seniors With COPD

Posted 6 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 6, 2017 – Seniors with COPD – a progressive lung disease that causes breathing problems – may increase their odds for heart-related death if they use opioid painkillers, a new study finds. COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder) patients are often prescribed opioids, including morphine and fentanyl. These narcotics can help treat chronic muscle and bone pain, insomnia, persistent cough and shortness of breath despite inhaler use, the researchers explained. "Previous research has shown about 70 percent of older adults with COPD use opioids, which is an incredibly high rate of new use in a population that is potentially more sensitive to narcotics," said study lead author Dr. Nicholas Vozoris. "Our new findings show there are not only increased risks for coronary artery disease-related death associated with new opioid use, but also increased risk of cardiac-related ... Read more

Related support groups: Suboxone, Oxycodone, Tramadol, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Percocet, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Opana, Subutex, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Dilaudid, Heart Attack, Opana ER, MS Contin

FDA Medwatch Alert: Brilinta (ticagrelor) 90 mg tablets, 8-count Physician Sample Bottles: Recall of Lot # JB5047 - Due to Report of Another Medicine in One Bottle

Posted 27 May 2017 by Drugs.com

ISSUE: AstraZeneca is notifying physicians and consumers that it is voluntarily recalling one lot of professional (physician) sample bottles containing eight tablets of Brilinta (ticagrelor) 90mg tablets as a precautionary measure. This voluntary recall follows a report that a professional sample bottle containing eight tablets of Brilinta 90mg also contained another medicine called Zurampic (lesinurad) 200 mg tablets which is also manufactured by AstraZeneca. Unintentional dosing with Zurampic has the potential to lead to adverse renal effects including acute renal failure which is more common when Zurampic is given alone as it should be used in combination with a xanthine oxidase inhibitor. Brilinta has a warning in its prescribing information regarding discontinuation of the medicine. Missed doses of Brilinta increases the risk of heart attack and stroke. People who are treated with ... Read more

Related support groups: Brilinta, Acute Coronary Syndrome, Ticagrelor

Heart Devices 101: Guide to the Tools That Keep You Ticking

Posted 3 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, April 2, 2017 – Pacemakers, defibrillators and other medical devices have saved the lives of millions of people worldwide. Someone you know probably has received one of these heart-health enhancers, although not all have become household words. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration evaluates and regulates these and other medical devices in the United States. Below, the agency provides a brief glossary of terms that might come in handy when a doctor recommends a cardiac tool: Heart pacemakers: These small, battery-powered devices are implanted in the body. They deliver an electric shock to restore normal heart rhythm when the heart beats too slowly. Implantable cardioverter defibrillators: These deliver a shock to restore normal heart rhythm when the heart beats too fast. Automated external defibrillators: These portable, automatic devices are found in many public locations. ... Read more

Related support groups: Atrial Fibrillation, Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Arrhythmia, Heart Failure, Congestive Heart Failure, Tachyarrhythmia, Angina, Supraventricular Tachycardia, Prevention of Thromboembolism in Atrial Fibrillation, Prosthetic Heart Valves, Cardiac Arrhythmia, Mitral Valve Prolapse, Ventricular Tachycardia, Myocardial Infarction, Prosthetic Heart Valves - Mechanical Valves, Atrial Flutter, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Mitral Insufficiency, Left Ventricular Dysfunction

Stent Patients Face Higher Risk of Death After Bleeding, Clots

Posted 15 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 15, 2017 – More than a year after getting stents to prop open their clogged arteries, some patients are still at increased risk of death if they suffer either blockages or bleeding events, researchers report. The researchers added that their findings highlight the need to identify which patients are more likely to benefit from prolonged anti-clotting treatment after stenting – and which are not. "Since our analysis found that the development of both ischemic [decreased blood flow] and bleeding events portend a particularly poor overall prognosis, we conclude that we must be thoughtful when prescribing any treatment... that may include bleeding risk," said study lead author Dr. Eric Secemsky. He is a fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital's division of cardiology. For the study, the researchers tracked long-term risks among people who had ischemia or bleeding events ... Read more

Related support groups: Aspirin, Ischemic Stroke, Excedrin, Alka-Seltzer, Aggrenox, Fiorinal, Excedrin Migraine, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Arthritis Pain, Ecotrin, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Fiorinal with Codeine, Bayer Aspirin, Acute Coronary Syndrome, Norgesic, Arthritis Pain Formula, Soma Compound, Excedrin Extra Strength, Anacin, Norgesic Forte

Smoking Raises Heart Attack Risk 8-Fold in People Under 50

Posted 30 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 29, 2016 – All smokers face a higher risk of heart attack, but the threat is particularly high among those under 50, a new study finds. Compared to former smokers and nonsmokers in their age group, heart attack risk was nearly 8.5 times higher for smokers younger than 50, British researchers found. One expert in smoking and health who reviewed the report said the findings underline the importance of keeping youth and cigarettes apart. "Through comprehensive tobacco-control programs that include environmental smoking bans, high taxes on cigarettes, and anti-tobacco media campaigns, we can decrease the rates of smoking/tobacco use, heart disease and many other health conditions," said Patricia Folan. She directs the Center for Tobacco Control at Northwell Health in Great Neck, N.Y. The study found that smokers at older ages faced higher heart risks, as well. Compared to ... Read more

Related support groups: Smoking, Heart Attack, Smoking Cessation, Nicotine, Myocardial Infarction, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Nicorette, Nicoderm CQ, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Nicotrol Inhaler, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Acute Coronary Syndrome, Commit, Atherosclerosis, Habitrol, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Acute Coronary Syndrome - Prophylaxis, Nicorelief, Nicorette DS, Nicotrol NS

Take Meds as Directed to Boost Survival After Heart Procedures

Posted 24 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 20, 2016 – Taking medications as prescribed improves outcomes for heart procedure patients, a new study finds. Researchers looked at 973 heart bypass patients and 2,255 patients who underwent angioplasty and stenting to reopen clogged heart arteries. Heart bypass surgery is when surgeons take a piece of blood vessel from somewhere else in the body to bypass a blocked portion of the heart's artery. Angioplasty is performed using a thin catheter that's threaded through the blood vessels to the heart. A balloon on the end of the catheter is inflated to open the narrowed blood vessel. Sometimes a stent (a mesh or wire tube) will be left in the blood vessel to keep it open. Prescribed medications in the study included cholesterol-lowering statins, blood thinners and beta blockers. Follow-up information was collected 12 to 18 months after the heart procedures. Overall, ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Metoprolol, Aspirin, Atenolol, Propranolol, Lipitor, Simvastatin, Atorvastatin, Crestor, Bystolic, Carvedilol, Pravastatin, Bisoprolol, Excedrin, Coreg, Sotalol, Inderal, Lovastatin, Toprol-XL, Zocor

Statins Often Interact With Other Heart Drugs

Posted 17 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 – Cholesterol-lowering statins can interact with other drugs prescribed for heart disease. But there are ways to navigate the problem, according to new recommendations from the American Heart Association. Statins are among the mostly widely prescribed drugs in the United States. Roughly one-quarter of Americans age 40 and up are on a statin, according to a 2014 study by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The drugs are prescribed to people who either have atherosclerosis (clogged arteries) or are at risk of it, which means many statin users also take other cardiovascular drugs, the heart association says. The benefits of those drug combinations will generally outweigh the risks, said Barbara Wiggins, a clinical pharmacy specialist in cardiology at the Medical University of South Carolina. But doctors and patients should be aware of how the drugs ... Read more

Related support groups: Warfarin, Amlodipine, Coumadin, Lipitor, Simvastatin, Atorvastatin, Diltiazem, Crestor, Norvasc, Pravastatin, Verapamil, Amiodarone, Digoxin, Nifedipine, Cardizem, Lovastatin, Zocor, Azor, Exforge, Multaq

Drug-Coated Stents Don't Improve Patient Survival, Large Study Reports

Posted 31 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 31, 2016 – The largest trial ever conducted on stents – tiny tubes that help keep heart arteries open – suggests that pricey drug-coated (or eluting) versions may perform no better for patients over the long-term, in terms of patient survival, compared to cheaper, "bare metal" versions. "The evidence in favor of contemporary drug-eluting stents over bare-metal stents may not be as strong as has been thought," said study author Dr. Kaare Harald Bonaa. He's from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim, Norway. Bare-metal stents were used in the early days of stenting. But, arteries sometimes re-closed around the stent. That meant surgeons often had to go back in and re-open the vessel – a procedure called revascularization. Then came drug-eluting stents. These devices were coated with drugs to prevent the vessel re-closure that plagued so many ... Read more

Related support groups: Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Acute Coronary Syndrome, Percutaneous Coronary Intervention, Revascularization Procedures - Prophylaxis, Vascular Surgery, Acute Coronary Syndrome - Prophylaxis, Revascularization Procedures, Coronary Arteriography

FDA Approves First Fully Dissolvable Stent

Posted 5 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 5, 2016 – The first coronary stent to be gradually absorbed by the body has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The Absorb GT1 Bioresorbable Vascular Scaffold System (BVS) is absorbed within about three years, the agency said Tuesday in a news release. The stent, a hollow mesh tube designed to prop open a formerly clogged artery, also releases the drug everolimus to limit the growth of scar tissue. Coronary artery disease leads to some 370,000 deaths annually in the United States, the FDA said. It occurs when cholesterol-laden deposits build up and narrow blood vessels, reducing blood flow to the heart. Symptoms commonly include chest pain, shortness of breath and fatigue. The condition is frequently treated using a procedure called angioplasty, in which a balloon-like device is expanded within an artery to open the vessel. But scar tissue can then ... Read more

Related support groups: High Cholesterol, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Acute Coronary Syndrome, Acute Coronary Syndrome - Prophylaxis, Revascularization Procedures - Prophylaxis, Coronary Arteriography, Revascularization Procedures

Just 6 Percent of Chest Pain Cases in ER Are Life-Threatening: Study

Posted 15 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 15, 2016 – Americans who develop chest pain often rush to the hospital, where they're treated with urgency. A new study suggests, however, that less than 6 percent of these patients suffer from life-threatening conditions such as a heart attack. Most often, physicians can't determine the cause of patients' chest pain, the researchers found. But chest pain can be a sign of serious illness, cautioned study lead author Dr. Renee Hsia, an emergency room physician and director of Health Policy Studies at the University of California, San Francisco. "This doesn't mean that patients shouldn't be worried when they experience chest pain," she said. "Depending on their risk factors, they certainly could be having a heart attack or another life-threatening condition, which is why it is important to seek timely medical care. "In the right patient population with risk factors, we ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Angina, Myocardial Infarction, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Acute Coronary Syndrome, Ischemic Heart Disease, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis

Type 2 Diabetes, Heart Disease a Dangerous Combo

Posted 13 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, June 11, 2016 – Prospects for people with type 2 diabetes and heart disease may be grimmer than previously believed, researchers report. "Type 2 diabetes accompanied by an acute coronary syndrome needs much more attention, especially in order to prevent yet another major cardiac event," said study leader Dr. William White. He is a professor with the University of Connecticut Health Center's Calhoun Cardiology Center. The study included more than 5,300 people around the world with type 2 diabetes. Those admitted to the hospital for congestive heart failure had a 24 percent to 28 percent chance of dying within 18 months. That's five times higher than the risk among those not hospitalized for a major heart problem, the researchers said. The risk of heart disease is two to three times higher among people with type 2 diabetes than in the general population, the study authors ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Angina, Insulin Resistance, Pre-Diabetes, Myocardial Infarction, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Diabetes Mellitus, Acute Coronary Syndrome, Ischemic Heart Disease, Acute Coronary Syndrome - Prophylaxis, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance

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