Skip to Content

Join the 'Acute Coronary Syndrome - Prophylaxis' group to help and get support from people like you.

Acute Coronary Syndrome - Prophylaxis News

Smoking Raises Heart Attack Risk 8-Fold in People Under 50

Posted 5 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 29, 2016 – All smokers face a higher risk of heart attack, but the threat is particularly high among those under 50, a new study finds. Compared to former smokers and nonsmokers in their age group, heart attack risk was nearly 8.5 times higher for smokers younger than 50, British researchers found. One expert in smoking and health who reviewed the report said the findings underline the importance of keeping youth and cigarettes apart. "Through comprehensive tobacco-control programs that include environmental smoking bans, high taxes on cigarettes, and anti-tobacco media campaigns, we can decrease the rates of smoking/tobacco use, heart disease and many other health conditions," said Patricia Folan. She directs the Center for Tobacco Control at Northwell Health in Great Neck, N.Y. The study found that smokers at older ages faced higher heart risks, as well. Compared to ... Read more

Related support groups: Smoking, Heart Attack, Smoking Cessation, Nicotine, Myocardial Infarction, Nicorette, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Nicoderm CQ, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Nicotrol Inhaler, Commit, Acute Coronary Syndrome, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Atherosclerosis, Habitrol, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Acute Coronary Syndrome - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome, Nicorelief, Nicorette DS

Take Meds as Directed to Boost Survival After Heart Procedures

Posted 24 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 20, 2016 – Taking medications as prescribed improves outcomes for heart procedure patients, a new study finds. Researchers looked at 973 heart bypass patients and 2,255 patients who underwent angioplasty and stenting to reopen clogged heart arteries. Heart bypass surgery is when surgeons take a piece of blood vessel from somewhere else in the body to bypass a blocked portion of the heart's artery. Angioplasty is performed using a thin catheter that's threaded through the blood vessels to the heart. A balloon on the end of the catheter is inflated to open the narrowed blood vessel. Sometimes a stent (a mesh or wire tube) will be left in the blood vessel to keep it open. Prescribed medications in the study included cholesterol-lowering statins, blood thinners and beta blockers. Follow-up information was collected 12 to 18 months after the heart procedures. Overall, ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Aspirin, Metoprolol, Atenolol, Lipitor, Propranolol, Simvastatin, Crestor, Bystolic, Atorvastatin, Pravastatin, Carvedilol, Bisoprolol, Excedrin, Inderal, Coreg, Zocor, Sotalol, Lovastatin, Lopressor

Statins Often Interact With Other Heart Drugs

Posted 17 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 – Cholesterol-lowering statins can interact with other drugs prescribed for heart disease. But there are ways to navigate the problem, according to new recommendations from the American Heart Association. Statins are among the mostly widely prescribed drugs in the United States. Roughly one-quarter of Americans age 40 and up are on a statin, according to a 2014 study by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The drugs are prescribed to people who either have atherosclerosis (clogged arteries) or are at risk of it, which means many statin users also take other cardiovascular drugs, the heart association says. The benefits of those drug combinations will generally outweigh the risks, said Barbara Wiggins, a clinical pharmacy specialist in cardiology at the Medical University of South Carolina. But doctors and patients should be aware of how the drugs ... Read more

Related support groups: Warfarin, Coumadin, Amlodipine, Lipitor, Simvastatin, Crestor, Diltiazem, Atorvastatin, Norvasc, Pravastatin, Verapamil, Amiodarone, Digoxin, Nifedipine, Cardizem, Zocor, Azor, Lovastatin, Exforge, Rosuvastatin

Drug-Coated Stents Don't Improve Patient Survival, Large Study Reports

Posted 31 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 31, 2016 – The largest trial ever conducted on stents – tiny tubes that help keep heart arteries open – suggests that pricey drug-coated (or eluting) versions may perform no better for patients over the long-term, in terms of patient survival, compared to cheaper, "bare metal" versions. "The evidence in favor of contemporary drug-eluting stents over bare-metal stents may not be as strong as has been thought," said study author Dr. Kaare Harald Bonaa. He's from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim, Norway. Bare-metal stents were used in the early days of stenting. But, arteries sometimes re-closed around the stent. That meant surgeons often had to go back in and re-open the vessel – a procedure called revascularization. Then came drug-eluting stents. These devices were coated with drugs to prevent the vessel re-closure that plagued so many ... Read more

Related support groups: Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Acute Coronary Syndrome, Percutaneous Coronary Intervention, Revascularization Procedures - Prophylaxis, Vascular Surgery, Acute Coronary Syndrome - Prophylaxis, Revascularization Procedures, Coronary Arteriography

FDA Approves First Fully Dissolvable Stent

Posted 5 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 5, 2016 – The first coronary stent to be gradually absorbed by the body has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The Absorb GT1 Bioresorbable Vascular Scaffold System (BVS) is absorbed within about three years, the agency said Tuesday in a news release. The stent, a hollow mesh tube designed to prop open a formerly clogged artery, also releases the drug everolimus to limit the growth of scar tissue. Coronary artery disease leads to some 370,000 deaths annually in the United States, the FDA said. It occurs when cholesterol-laden deposits build up and narrow blood vessels, reducing blood flow to the heart. Symptoms commonly include chest pain, shortness of breath and fatigue. The condition is frequently treated using a procedure called angioplasty, in which a balloon-like device is expanded within an artery to open the vessel. But scar tissue can then ... Read more

Related support groups: High Cholesterol, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Acute Coronary Syndrome, Acute Coronary Syndrome - Prophylaxis, Revascularization Procedures - Prophylaxis, Coronary Arteriography, Revascularization Procedures

Type 2 Diabetes, Heart Disease a Dangerous Combo

Posted 13 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, June 11, 2016 – Prospects for people with type 2 diabetes and heart disease may be grimmer than previously believed, researchers report. "Type 2 diabetes accompanied by an acute coronary syndrome needs much more attention, especially in order to prevent yet another major cardiac event," said study leader Dr. William White. He is a professor with the University of Connecticut Health Center's Calhoun Cardiology Center. The study included more than 5,300 people around the world with type 2 diabetes. Those admitted to the hospital for congestive heart failure had a 24 percent to 28 percent chance of dying within 18 months. That's five times higher than the risk among those not hospitalized for a major heart problem, the researchers said. The risk of heart disease is two to three times higher among people with type 2 diabetes than in the general population, the study authors ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Angina, Insulin Resistance, Pre-Diabetes, Myocardial Infarction, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Diabetes Mellitus, Acute Coronary Syndrome, Ischemic Heart Disease, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Acute Coronary Syndrome - Prophylaxis

PTSD May Stiffen Veterans' Arteries, Boosting Heart Risks

Posted 24 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 23, 2016 – Veterans suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may have blood vessels that don't expand normally, a new study suggests. If vessels don't widen as they should, the risk of heart attack and stroke goes up, the researchers noted. The researchers also found that risk factors usually associated with blood vessel problems – such as high blood pressure, diabetes, high cholesterol and smoking – didn't seem to account for why people with PTSD were more likely to have blood vessels that didn't dilate properly. The researchers suspect that stress may be to blame. "We believe that we should try to gain a better understanding of the relationship between mental illness and cardiovascular health," said lead researcher Dr. Marlene Grenon. She's an associate professor of surgery at the University of California, San Francisco, and the Veterans Affairs Medical ... Read more

Related support groups: Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Heart Disease, Angina, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Acute Coronary Syndrome, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Atherosclerosis, Ischemic Heart Disease, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders, Acute Coronary Syndrome - Prophylaxis, Coronary Arteriography

Younger Female Heart Patients More Likely to Need Follow-Up Care

Posted 24 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 23, 2016 – Women under 50 who've been treated once for heart disease seem to fare worse than similarly treated men, a new report shows. Younger women who'd already had a procedure known as angioplasty to open their heart arteries were significantly more likely to need additional procedures to keep those arteries open and functioning well than men were, the study said. Angioplasty is a procedure in which a tiny balloon is inflated inside an artery to widen the vessel and clear partial blockages. The researchers pointed out that even though young women's arteries appeared to be healthier and less blocked than those of their male counterparts, they were still more likely to need more treatment. "Although women tended to have less heart disease than men, they had generally worse outcomes over one year and five years compared to men," said lead researcher Dr. Robert Wilensky, ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Acute Coronary Syndrome, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders, Percutaneous Coronary Intervention, Acute Coronary Syndrome - Prophylaxis, High Risk Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty, Coronary Arteriography

Exercise Regularly and Your Heart Will Thank You

Posted 18 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 18, 2016 – Regular exercise is essential for keeping your heart healthy, and the more the better, experts from the American College of Cardiology's Sports and Exercise Cardiology Council say. The study authors examined recent research and found that even small amounts of exercise, including standing, can reduce the risk of heart disease. Even greater reductions in risk can be achieved with more exercise, the researchers said. But only half of American adults get the recommended 150 minutes of moderate or 75 minutes of vigorous exercise a week, the report authors noted. The new research also reviewed recent studies that have suggested that excessive aerobic exercise – such as endurance races – may harm the heart. While that possibility warrants further investigation, current research shows that even for people with extremely high levels of training, the benefits of ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Angina Pectoris Prophylaxis, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Acute Coronary Syndrome - Prophylaxis

Health Tip: Understanding Risk Factors for Hardening Arteries

Posted 25 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Atherosclerosis, the medical term for hardening of the arteries, occurs when the arteries narrow and become rigid. Left undetected or untreated, one or more of these vessels may become completely blocked. The American Academy of Family Physicians explains these risk factors: Having high blood pressure. Having high cholesterol. Being diabetic. Being overweight or obese. Using tobacco. Eating an unhealthy diet. Getting insufficient exercise. Having family members with heart disease. Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Obesity, Hypertension, Smoking, High Cholesterol, Smoking Cessation, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Acute Coronary Syndrome, Hyperlipoproteinemia, Acute Coronary Syndrome - Prophylaxis, Hypertensive Heart Disease

Angioplasty May Not Boost Survival for Some Heart Disease Patients

Posted 11 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 11, 2015 – Angioplasty – the procedure used to open narrowed or blocked arteries – doesn't seem to lengthen life for people with stable heart disease and chest pain, a new study finds. After 15 years of follow-up, the study found that people who had angioplasty fared no better than those who had their heart disease treated with medication and lifestyle changes alone. "[Angioplasty and] stenting is effective and improves survival when performed early in the course of a heart attack," said lead researcher Dr. Steven Sedlis, an associate professor of medicine at NYU Medical School in New York City. "But the benefits of routine [angioplasty and] stenting for patients with stable heart disease have been uncertain and highly controversial." During the angioplasty procedure, a small tube may be placed in the blood vessel to keep it open. This is called stenting. Routine ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Angina, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Angina Pectoris Prophylaxis, Acute Coronary Syndrome, Ischemic Heart Disease, Percutaneous Coronary Intervention, Acute Coronary Syndrome - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome, High Risk Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty, Coronary Arteriography

Worse Psoriasis, Less Healthy Arteries, Study Finds

Posted 8 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 8, 2015 – The skin disorder psoriasis appears linked with artery inflammation, raising the odds for heart disease, a new study says. "As the amount of psoriasis increases, the amount of blood vessel inflammation increases," said senior investigator Dr. Nehal Mehta, a clinical investigator with the U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. His team also found that even mild psoriasis may indicate an increased risk for heart attack and stroke. Just one psoriasis skin patch, or plaque, "might be biologically active, causing low-grade inflammation and starting a cascade, speeding up their blood vessel disease," Mehta said. "People really should know that psoriasis is not just a cosmetic disease," he added. However, these study findings only show an association between psoriasis and blood vessel inflammation, not a direct cause-and-effect relationship, Mehta said. His ... Read more

Related support groups: Methotrexate, Psoriasis, Inflammatory Conditions, Plaque Psoriasis, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Soriatane, Dovonex, Tazorac, Acute Coronary Syndrome, Oxsoralen, Taclonex, Calcipotriene, Tazarotene, Acitretin, Resorcinol, Anthralin, Vectical, Acute Coronary Syndrome - Prophylaxis, Psoriatec, Trexall

Aspirin Use Common Among Americans With Heart Trouble

Posted 16 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 16, 2015 – About seven in 10 Americans who've had heart disease or a stroke regularly take aspirin, U.S. health officials report. Low-dose aspirin is promoted as an inexpensive, effective way to prevent cardiovascular disease. Researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention wanted to know who takes it regularly (daily or every other day) and why. "Overall, 70.8 percent of adult respondents with existing [cardiovascular disease] reported using aspirin regularly (every day or every other day)," the researchers found. Nearly 94 percent of regular low-dose aspirin (or baby aspirin) users with a history of heart problems said they take it for heart attack prevention. Four out of five said they take it for stroke prevention, and 76 percent for both heart attack and stroke prevention, the study authors reported Thursday. The study was based on an analysis ... Read more

Related support groups: Aspirin, Heart Attack, Excedrin, Transient Ischemic Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Aggrenox, Alka-Seltzer, Fiorinal, Excedrin Migraine, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Ecotrin, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Arthritis Pain, Fiorinal with Codeine, Arthritis Pain Formula, Soma Compound, Bayer Aspirin, Norgesic, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Thromboembolic Stroke Prophylaxis

Wider Use of Statin Drugs Could Save Thousands More Lives: Report

Posted 14 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 14, 2015 – New expert guidelines from two major cardiologists' groups may boost doctors' ability to spot patients who should take cholesterol-lowering statin drugs, researchers said. The updated guidelines were released in 2013 by the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association. Now, a new report finds they are more accurate and efficient than earlier guidelines in identifying adults at high risk for heart trouble who could gain from statins. All of that should add up to lives saved, the researchers said. "Extrapolating our results to the approximately 10 million U.S. adults who would be newly eligible for statin therapy under the new guidelines, we estimate that between 41,000 and 63,000 cardiovascular events – heart attacks, strokes or deaths from cardiovascular disease – would be prevented over a 10-year period," lead researcher Dr. Udo Hoffman, ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, High Cholesterol, Lipitor, Simvastatin, Crestor, Atorvastatin, Pravastatin, Zocor, Lovastatin, Rosuvastatin, Hypertriglyceridemia, High Cholesterol - Familial Heterozygous, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Pravachol, Livalo, High Cholesterol - Familial Homozygous, Red Yeast Rice, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Lescol, Ischemic Heart Disease

1 in 6 Americans Too Far From Lifesaving Heart Centers

Posted 13 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 13, 2015 – Tens of millions of rural, poor and Hispanic Americans do not have timely access to a lifesaving heart procedure, a new study finds. Researchers analyzed the driving times for 306 million people to reach the closest angioplasty centers across the continental United States. Angioplasty is used to open blocked heart arteries. A catheter is used to insert a deflated balloon into the artery. The balloon is then inflated to open the artery and restore blood flow to the heart. There are more than 1,700 angioplasty centers in the United States, the researchers said. The median time to an angioplasty center was 33 minutes, they found. However, the median travel time for more than 16 percent of the population – about 50 million people – was 81 minutes, according to the study. Results were published July 13 in the journal Health Services Research. It shouldn't take ... Read more

Related support groups: Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Peripheral Arterial Disease, Acute Coronary Syndrome, Percutaneous Coronary Intervention, Acute Coronary Syndrome - Prophylaxis, Coronary Arteriography, High Risk Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty

Page 1 2 Next

Ask a Question

Further Information

Related Condition Support Groups

Acute Coronary Syndrome

Related Drug Support Groups

Plavix, clopidogrel