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Calcium Supplements Tied to Kidney Stone Risk in Study

Posted 13 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 13, 2015 – People with a history of kidney stones may have a higher risk of recurrence if they use calcium supplements, a new study finds. The findings, based on records from more than 2,000 patients, add to evidence linking calcium supplements to kidney stone risk. But researchers also said that people taking calcium under a doctor's advice should not stop on their own. "We're definitely not advocating that people stop taking calcium supplements if their doctor prescribed them for their bone health," said Christopher Loftus, the lead researcher on the study and an M.D. candidate at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine. Loftus is scheduled to present his findings next month at the American Society of Nephrology's annual meeting in San Diego. Data and conclusions presented at meetings should be considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed medical ... Read more

Related support groups: Kidney Infections, Tums, Caltrate, Calcium Carbonate, Arthritis Pain Formula, Pepcid Complete, Rolaids, Caltrate 600 with D, Titralac, Oyster, Oyster Shell, Pyelonephritis, Titralac Plus, Os-Cal, Citracal + D, Os-Cal 500, Os-Cal 500 with D, Calcium/Vitamin D, Calcium Gluconate, Oysco 500 with D

Added Calcium May Not Help Older Bones: Studies

Posted 29 Sep 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 29, 2015 – Extra calcium may not protect your aging bones after all. New Zealand researchers who analyzed more than 100 previous investigations say guidelines advising seniors to consume at least 1,000 to 1,200 milligrams of calcium a day are misplaced. No proof was found that boosting calcium intake beyond normal dietary levels strengthens older bones or prevents fractures, said researcher Dr. Mark Bolland. "We've gathered all the clinical studies of calcium supplements and dietary calcium intake for both bone density and fractures," said Bolland, an associate professor in the department of medicine at the University of Auckland. "Taken together, we think this is the strongest possible evidence that taking calcium supplements will not be beneficial unless there are clear medical reasons that a calcium supplement is needed," he said. Moreover, excess calcium ... Read more

Related support groups: Osteoporosis, Tums, Fracture, bone, Caltrate, Prevention of Osteoporosis, Calcium Carbonate, Arthritis Pain Formula, Pepcid Complete, Rolaids, Oyster, Titralac, Oyster Shell, Titralac Plus, Os-Cal, Os-Cal 500, Slow-Mag, Titralac Plus Liquid, Chooz, Actonel with Calcium, Tums E-X

Growth Hormone May Lower Odds of Fractures in Older Women

Posted 27 Aug 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 27, 2015 – Older women with osteoporosis could get lasting benefits from a few years on growth hormone, a new, small trial suggests. Researchers found that when women with the bone-thinning disease took growth hormone for three years, their fracture risk was still reduced seven years later. Before entering the study, 56 percent of the women had suffered a bone break; over the 10-year study period, 28 percent sustained a fracture. But the study, reported online Aug. 27 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, only involved 55 women who used growth hormone. And experts said it is unlikely to become an approved treatment for osteoporosis any time soon. Still, the results are "pretty exciting," since they show a sustained effect on women's fracture risk, said Dr. Jerome Tolbert, an endocrinologist at Mount Sinai Beth Israel in New York City. "Osteoporosis is a ... Read more

Related support groups: Osteoporosis, Fosamax, Boniva, Alendronate, Reclast, Fracture, bone, Actonel, Prevention of Osteoporosis, Zometa, Aclasta, Nutropin, Genotropin, Zoledronic Acid, Humatrope, Atelvia, Ibandronate, Risedronate, Nutropin AQ, Serostim, Saizen

Certain Generic Meds May Help Older Patients With Early Breast Cancer

Posted 23 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 23, 2015 – There's more evidence that two classes of inexpensive generic drugs reduce the risk of death in postmenopausal women with early breast cancer, a pair of new British studies find. The two classes of drugs – called aromatase inhibitors and bisphosphonates – can also be used together to increase the benefits and reduce some side effects, according to the authors of the studies published July 23 in The Lancet. Aromatase inhibitors include drugs such as anastrozole, letrozole and exemestane, while bisphosphonates include drugs such as zoledronic acid. The two new studies "provide really good evidence that both of these inexpensive generic drugs can help to reduce breast cancer mortality in postmenopausal women," Richard Gray, the University of Oxford lead statistician for both studies, said in a journal news release. The studies were released by The Early Breast ... Read more

Related support groups: Breast Cancer, Fosamax, Arimidex, Femara, Boniva, Alendronate, Anastrozole, Reclast, Actonel, Letrozole, Aromasin, Zometa, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Exemestane, Aclasta, Zoledronic Acid, Atelvia, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Risedronate, Ibandronate

Strong Bones After 50? Women May Not Need Next Test Until 65

Posted 9 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, June 9, 2015 – A postmenopausal woman who is 50 and still shows "normal" readings on her bone density test may not need her next such test for 10 or even 15 years, a new study finds. However, researchers led by Dr. Margaret Gourlay of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill stressed that younger women who do show signs of bone loss are at high risk for a major fracture, and do require regular testing. The study involved almost 4,100 postmenopausal American women between the ages of 50 and 64 who took part in the ongoing Women's Health Initiative study. All of the women had undergone a bone mineral density test to assess their risk for fractures and osteoporosis. The women were not taking hormones, calcium or vitamin D supplements. They also had never had a broken bone, the team said. The results: Among women whose tests showed no signs of osteoporosis, it took nearly ... Read more

Related support groups: Hot Flashes, Menopausal Disorders, Osteoporosis, Fosamax, Postmenopausal Symptoms, Boniva, Alendronate, Prolia, Reclast, Fracture, bone, Actonel, Prevention of Osteoporosis, Zometa, Aclasta, Xgeva, Zoledronic Acid, Atelvia, Ibandronate, Risedronate, Caltrate 600 with D

Too Many Women Who Need Bone Screening Aren't Getting It

Posted 25 May 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 25, 2015 – Too few women at high risk for osteoporosis are being tested for the bone-depleting condition, while too many women at low-risk are being screened, a new study suggests. A team led by Dr. Anna Lee Amarnath of the University of California, Davis, examined the medical records of nearly 51,000 women, aged 40 to 85, living in the Sacramento area. The researchers looked at whether or not women were getting a dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) test, which measures bone mineral density. The result: Osteoporosis screening rates jumped sharply at age 50, despite guidelines suggesting that screening only begin at age 65, unless a woman has certain risk factors. However, the study also found that those risk factors – a small body frame, a history of fractures, or taking medications that could thin bones – had only a slight effect on a woman's decision to get her bones ... Read more

Related support groups: Osteoporosis, Fosamax, Boniva, Alendronate, Reclast, Fracture, bone, Actonel, Prevention of Osteoporosis, Zometa, Aclasta, Zoledronic Acid, Atelvia, Ibandronate, Risedronate, Pamidronate, Diagnosis and Investigation, Fosamax Plus D, Skelid, Aredia, Actonel with Calcium

Bone Drugs May Protect Against Endometrial Cancer

Posted 22 Dec 2014 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Dec. 22, 2014 – Bisphosphonates, which are drugs that treat bone loss, may lower the risk of endometrial cancer, new research suggests. The study found that women taking the drugs had about half the risk of endometrial cancer compared to women who don't take the drugs. Endometrial cancer – one of the most common types of cancer in women – affects the lining of the uterus. Bisphosphonates include medications that go by brand names such as Actonel, Boniva and Fosamax. Researchers examined the medical records of women who took bisphosphonates that contain nitrogen, which is thought to boost anti-cancer abilities. They studied almost 30,000 women overall. When assessing risk, they accounted for factors such as age, race and smoking status. The study appears Dec. 22 in the journal Cancer. "Other studies have shown that bisphosphonates may reduce the risk of certain cancers, but we ... Read more

Related support groups: Fosamax, Boniva, Alendronate, Reclast, Actonel, Endometrial Cancer, Zometa, Aclasta, Zoledronic Acid, Atelvia, Ibandronate, Risedronate, Pamidronate, Fosamax Plus D, Skelid, Aredia, Actonel with Calcium, Alendronate/Cholecalciferol, Binosto, Etidronate

Too Few Prostate Cancer Patients Get Bone-Strengthening Meds: Study

Posted 3 Dec 2014 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 2, 2014 – Many men on hormone therapy for prostate cancer aren't getting bone-strengthening drugs they may need, new Canadian research contends. Hormone therapy, which suppresses male hormones called androgens, helps stop cancer cells from growing. But one consequence of the treatment is weakening of the bones, which can lead to fractures. To reduce this risk, men can be given oral bisphosphonates, such as Fosamax, or an intravenous treatment once a month or once a year with similar drugs, such as Reclast. "There seems to be a clear mismatch between Canadian guidelines regarding bisphosphonate usage in men undergoing hormone therapy for prostate cancer and actual clinical practice," said lead researcher Dr. Shabbir Alibhai, a senior scientist at the University Health Network in Toronto. While the low rates of bisphosphonate prescriptions may be appropriate for patients ... Read more

Related support groups: Provera, Depo-Provera, Accutane, Lupron, Prostate Cancer, Tamoxifen, Medroxyprogesterone, Fosamax, Arimidex, Tretinoin, Femara, Lupron Depot, Boniva, Isotretinoin, Alendronate, Claravis, Anastrozole, Reclast, Zoladex, Evista

Osteoporosis Drugs Work, But Review Finds No Clear Winner

Posted 8 Sep 2014 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Sept. 8, 2014 – Many osteoporosis drugs cut women's risk of suffering a bone fracture, though it's not clear whether any one medication works better than others, a new research review finds. Reporting Sept. 8 in Annals of Internal Medicine, researchers said that for women with the bone-thinning disease osteoporosis, various drugs cut the risk of a spine fracture by 40 to 60 percent, compared to a placebo. When it comes to other bone breaks, including hip fractures, the drugs lower the risk by 20 to 40 percent, the study said. The beneficial drugs included bisphosphonates, sold under brand names such as Actonel (risedronate), Boniva (ibandronate) and Fosamax (alendronate), and the injection drugs denosumab (Prolia) and teriparatide (Forteo). Meanwhile, raloxifene (Evista) – a daily pill that has estrogen-like effects on bones – seems to cut the risk of spine fractures only, ... Read more

Related support groups: Osteoporosis, Fosamax, Forteo, Boniva, Alendronate, Prolia, Reclast, Fracture, bone, Evista, Actonel, Prevention of Osteoporosis, Zometa, Aclasta, Xgeva, Zoledronic Acid, Atelvia, Ibandronate, Risedronate, Teriparatide, Raloxifene

More Evidence Ties Some Bone-Building Drugs to Rare Fractures

Posted 4 Sep 2014 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 4, 2014 – Taking osteoporosis drugs called bisphosphonates to help prevent fractures may carry a slight risk for unusual breaks in the thigh bone, Swedish researchers report. For those who took bisphosphonates for four to five years, the so-called "relative risk" was 100 times higher than among people who didn't use the medications. But the researchers explained that the absolute risk of having such a fracture was small, and would affect only one in 1,000 people. "If you have osteoporosis, the benefit of bisphosphonates outweighs the risk during the first years of treatment. But if you don't have osteoporosis, but only a moderate decrease in bone density, the benefit is likely to be smaller than the risk," said lead researcher Dr. Per Aspenberg, a professor of orthopaedic surgery at Linkoping University in Sweden. However, U.S. experts said bisphosphonates still have a ... Read more

Related support groups: Osteoporosis, Fosamax, Boniva, Alendronate, Reclast, Fracture, bone, Actonel, Prevention of Osteoporosis, Zometa, Aclasta, Zoledronic Acid, Atelvia, Risedronate, Ibandronate, Pamidronate, Fosamax Plus D, Skelid, Aredia, Actonel with Calcium, Alendronate/Cholecalciferol

Bone Drugs Don't Lower Breast Cancer Risk After All, Study Finds

Posted 11 Aug 2014 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 11 – Drugs known as bisphosphonates, commonly prescribed to treat the bone-weakening disease osteoporosis, don't appear to reduce the risk of breast cancer as previously thought, new research finds. "We found that postmenopausal women who took a bisphosphonate for three or four years did not have a decreased risk in breast cancer," said study author Trisha Hue, an epidemiologist at the University of California, San Francisco. When prior observational studies noted links between the drugs' use and lower breast cancer risk in, experts assumed the drugs deserved the credit. However, based on the new findings, Hue suspects that low estrogen levels may have been the risk-reducer. "Women who get bisphosphonates have a low bone mass density," she said. "If you have low bone mass density, you probably have low estrogen." This is because the hormone, which is depleted after ... Read more

Related support groups: Breast Cancer, Osteoporosis, Fosamax, Boniva, Alendronate, Reclast, Actonel, Prevention of Osteoporosis, Zometa, Aclasta, Zoledronic Acid, Atelvia, Ibandronate, Risedronate, Pamidronate, Fosamax Plus D, Skelid, Aredia, Actonel with Calcium, Alendronate/Cholecalciferol

Calcium May Cut Risk for Precancerous Colon Lesions in Some People

Posted 10 Apr 2013 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 10 – Consuming higher amounts of calcium may lower the likelihood of precancerous colon and rectal lesions in people who are at increased risk due to variations in two genes, a new study suggests. High calcium intake did not affect risk in people without the genetic variations. The findings may help explain inconsistent results in previous research about the link between calcium intake and the risk for these lesions, called colorectal adenomas, the researchers said. They also said the findings may help identify patients who would benefit from calcium supplements or higher levels of calcium in their diet. The study of nearly 6,000 people in Tennessee found that patients with the highest calcium intake had no reduced risk for colorectal adenomas if they had no variations in two genes – KCNJ1 and SLC12A1 – that are essential in calcium reabsorption in the kidneys. ... Read more

Related support groups: Colorectal Cancer, Tums, Caltrate, Calcium Carbonate, Calcium Citrate, Citracal, Arthritis Pain Formula, Pepcid Complete, Rolaids, PhosLo, Titralac, Oyster, Oyster Shell, Calcium Acetate, Titralac Plus, Os-Cal 500, Domeboro, Os-Cal, Calcium Chloride, Slow-Mag

Healthy Older Women Advised Against Taking Calcium

Posted 25 Feb 2013 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 25 – Healthy older women should not take calcium and vitamin D supplements to prevent fractures, according to a final recommendation issued Monday by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. In healthy adults, lower doses of calcium and vitamin D seem to be ineffective. As for higher doses, it's still up in the air, the government group said. The new recommendations do not apply to people who are known to be vitamin D-deficient or who already have osteoporosis, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) noted. Every year about 1.5 million fractures in the United States are attributed to osteoporosis, which is caused by a decrease in bone mass and density that makes bones fragile and more susceptible to a break. Almost half of all women older than 50 will have an osteoporosis-related fracture in their lifetime, according to the USPSTF. Calcium is one of the main ... Read more

Related support groups: Osteoporosis, Tums, Caltrate, Prevention of Osteoporosis, Calcium Carbonate, Calcium Citrate, Citracal, Pepcid Complete, Arthritis Pain Formula, Rolaids, Oyster, Titralac, Oyster Shell, Titralac Plus, Os-Cal 500, Calcium Chloride, Os-Cal, Slow-Mag, Calcium Gluconate, Actonel with Calcium

Calcium Supplements May Raise Odds of Heart Death in Women

Posted 12 Feb 2013 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 12 – Women eating a high-calcium diet and taking calcium supplements adding up to more than 1,400 milligrams a day may be running nearly twice the risk of dying from heart disease, a large Swedish study suggests. Both men and women take calcium supplements to prevent bone loss. The new findings come on the heels of another recent study that found a similar increased risk of death related to calcium intake among men. "Many older adults increase dietary intake of calcium or take calcium supplements to prevent bone loss and there had been speculation that increased calcium intake with or without vitamin D could improve cardiovascular health," said Dr. Gregg Fonarow, an American Heart Association spokesman who wasn't involved in the study. However, a number of recent studies have suggested that higher dietary intake or calcium supplementation may not only not improve ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Dietary Supplementation, Tums, Caltrate, Prevention of Osteoporosis, Calcium Carbonate, Calcium Citrate, Citracal, Pepcid Complete, Arthritis Pain Formula, Rolaids, Oyster, Titralac, Oyster Shell, Titralac Plus, Os-Cal 500, Os-Cal, Slow-Mag, Calcium Gluconate, Actonel with Calcium

Newer Bone Drug Better for Advanced Breast Cancer Patients: Study

Posted 14 Aug 2012 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 14 – The relatively new drug denosumab (Xgeva) reduces bone complications of advanced breast cancer more effectively than another osteoporosis drug, zoledronic acid (Zometa), according to new research. Zoledronic acid belongs to a class of drugs known as bisphosphonates, which help delay bone complications such as fractures, spinal cord compression and bone pain. But zoledronic acid has been linked with kidney toxicity and other reactions. Denosumab, a newer drug called a monoclonal antibody, is superior to zoledronic acid in reducing skeletal problems and better tolerated, the study found. "It's more effective at preventing bone destruction caused by breast cancer that has spread to the bone," said Dr. Alison Stopeck, associate professor of medicine at the University of Arizona, Tucson, and an investigator on the study, which was published Aug. 14 in the journal Clinical ... Read more

Related support groups: Fosamax, Boniva, Alendronate, Prolia, Reclast, Actonel, Zometa, Aclasta, Xgeva, Zoledronic Acid, Atelvia, Ibandronate, Risedronate, Pamidronate, Fosamax Plus D, Denosumab, Skelid, Osteolytic Bone Metastases of Breast Cancer, Aredia, Actonel with Calcium

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