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Low-Carb Diet May Aid Your Metabolism

Posted 4 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 2, 2016 – Eating low-carbohydrate meals may lead to healthy changes in a woman's metabolism that don't occur when consuming higher-carbohydrate meals, a small study suggests. The researchers also found that the timing of exercise may play a role in how beneficial it is for your metabolism. The study's senior author, Katarina Borer, said the study illustrates that small changes can make a difference, such as watching the kinds of foods you eat and not exercising at an inappropriate time. "It's an empowering message," said Borer, a professor at the University of Michigan's School of Kinesiology. The study reported that when people ate three meals containing just 30 percent carbohydrates over a 24-hour period, they had a 30 percent reduction in their after-meal insulin resistance and insulin levels. Insulin is a hormone that helps the body use carbohydrates from food to fuel ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Weight Loss, Postmenopausal Symptoms, Insulin Resistance, Pre-Diabetes, Diabetes Mellitus, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Intravenous Insulin Drip

Standing or 'Easy' Walks May Help Type 2 Diabetics Control Blood Sugar

Posted 6 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 30, 2016 – For people with type 2 diabetes, better blood sugar control may be as easy as getting up off the couch and standing every so often, or taking a leisurely walk, a new study shows. Dutch researchers noted that "moderate to vigorous" exercise is often recommended for people with diabetes – but most patients don't comply with that advice. This small new study suggests that even sitting a bit less might be of real benefit. One diabetes expert in the United States agreed with that advice. "For years, I would suggest an exercise regimen to my patients that I knew was doomed to failure," said Dr. Robert Courgi, an endocrinologist at Northwell Health's Southside Hospital in Bay Shore, N.Y. However, "by tweaking the message a bit, the odds of success increase significantly," he said. "Ultimately, any activity helps lower glucose [blood sugar]. The message of 'sitting ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Insulin Resistance, Pre-Diabetes, Diabetes Mellitus, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance

Doctors Should Counsel Even Low-Risk Patients on Heart Health

Posted 7 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 29, 2016 – Primary care doctors should offer counseling about healthy lifestyle habits to prevent heart disease – even to adults who have a low or average risk of developing heart troubles, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force advises. The task force is an influential, independent panel of national experts in prevention and evidence-based medicine. "For people who are not at increased risk for heart disease, counseling on healthy eating and physical activity may help prevent heart disease for some people," task force vice chair Susan Curry said in a panel news release. Curry is dean of the University of Iowa College of Public Health. This latest draft recommendation reaffirms a prior advisory from the task force in 2012. "The task force encourages primary care professionals to individualize this counseling and consider offering it to adults who are interested in and ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Ischemic Stroke, Insulin Resistance, Transient Ischemic Attack, Pre-Diabetes, Diabetes Mellitus, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Ischemic Heart Disease, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance

Insulin Prices Skyrocket, Putting Many Diabetics in a Bind

Posted 7 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 29, 2016 – Insulin, a life-saving medication used to treat diabetes, was discovered nearly 100 years ago, yet the price of the drug has now spiked by 700 percent in just two decades. In early November, Sen. Bernie Sanders, the Vermont Democrat, pointed out that certain insulins had risen from $21 a vial in 1996 to $255 a vial in 2016. Some have likened the insulin price boosts to the recent price hikes for EpiPen – the life-saving medication needed when someone has a serious allergic reaction. Edith Prentiss, 64, of New York City, knows all too well what the rising cost of insulin means for her. She needs insulin to treat her diabetes and stay alive, yet living on a fixed income has forced her to make tough choices on which drug she can afford. "I have other medications I've been on for years, and as they became generic, they got cheaper. Insulin has never gotten any ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Insulin, Lantus, Insulin Resistance, Pre-Diabetes, Diabetes Mellitus, EpiPen, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Intravenous Insulin Drip

Diabetics Can Keep Disease Complications at Bay

Posted 12 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 24, 2016 – People with diabetes are at risk for vascular complications due to high blood sugar levels, but can take measures to reduce that risk, an expert says. "Diabetes is one of the strongest risk factors for any form of vascular disease, both symptomatic and asymptomatic," Dr. Gregory Moneta, chief of vascular surgery at Oregon Health and Science University's Cardiovascular Institute, said in a Society for Vascular Surgery news release. "Those with diabetes should have regular doctor visits and tests, and may need to see specialists such as ophthalmologists, vascular surgeons and podiatrists for checkups," he added. Vascular complications caused by diabetes include diabetic eye disease, peripheral artery disease (impaired circulation in the legs), peripheral neuropathy (nerve damage) and foot ulcers, heart attack and kidney failure. Steps to prevent these ... Read more

Related support groups: Insulin Resistance, Pre-Diabetes, Diabetes Mellitus, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Cerebrovascular Insufficiency

These Medicines Often Send Americans to ERs

Posted 14 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 22, 2016 – An estimated one in 250 Americans lands in the hospital emergency department each year because of a medication-related reaction or problem, a new federal study finds. Among adults 65 and older, the rate is about one in 100, the study authors said. Remarkably, the medicines causing the most trouble haven't changed in a decade, the researchers noted. Blood thinners, diabetes medicines and antibiotics top the list. These drugs accounted for 47 percent of emergency department visits for adverse drug events in 2013 and 2014, according to the analysis. Among older adults, blood thinners, diabetes medicines and opioid painkillers are implicated in nearly 60 percent of emergency department visits for adverse drug events. "The same drugs are causing the most problems," said study co-author Dr. Daniel Budnitz. The study doesn't tease out what went wrong. The reasons ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Suboxone, Oxycodone, Diabetes, Type 2, Back Pain, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Percocet, Tramadol, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Opana, Warfarin, Coumadin, Subutex

Smoking Plus Diabetes a Very Deadly Mix

Posted 14 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 22, 2016 – While smoking is tough enough on health, adding in diabetes boosts the risk of an early death even more, new research confirms. Heavy smokers who also have diabetes are at twice the risk of an early death compared to smokers without the blood sugar disease, the study found. "Smoking is bad for all, but even more in those with diabetes," said Dr. Joel Zonszein, director of the Clinical Diabetes Center at Montefiore Medical Center in New York City. He reviewed the new findings. The study was conducted by researchers at the University of Colorado, Denver, and involved data on more than 53,000 Americans who were either current or former heavy smokers. The overall risk of an early death was roughly double if the smoker had diabetes, the researchers reported. Overall, almost 13 percent of smokers with diabetes died during the seven-year study period, compared with ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Diabetes, Type 1, Diabetic Neuropathy, Insulin Resistance, Diabetic Nerve Damage, Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Pre-Diabetes, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Intravenous Insulin Drip

Fewer Americans Suffering From Dementia, Study Finds

Posted 15 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 21, 2016 – Here's some good news for America's seniors: Dementia rates have dropped dramatically over the last decade or so, according to a new study. An analysis of responses from a study of more than 10,000 people aged 65 and older found the prevalence of dementia dropped about 24 percent between 2000 and 2012. The reasons for the decline aren't clear, researchers say. But two factors stand out: The participants in 2012 had more years of schooling than those in 2000; and chronic conditions such as high blood pressure and diabetes were being controlled more aggressively. "The decline in dementia risk among older adults that we found in our study – and that an increasing number of other studies around the world have found – does not mean that Alzheimer's and dementia have been solved," said lead researcher Dr. Kenneth Langa. He is a professor of medicine at the ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Type 2, Hypertension, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Insulin Resistance, Pre-Diabetes, Diabetes Mellitus, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Lewy Body Dementia

Can Protein, Probiotics Help With Blood Sugar Control?

Posted 18 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 17, 2016 – Adding protein-rich or probiotic-laden foods to your diet may help control your blood sugar levels, according to a pair of new studies. Both proteins and probiotics appear to slow down digestion of carbohydrates, preventing blood sugar spikes that can lead to type 2 diabetes or exacerbate damage done by the disease, researchers found. Eating tuna fish with a slice of white bread produced a slower rise in blood sugar than eating carbs alone, said Huicui Meng, who led one of the studies. She's a postdoctoral researcher at Tufts University's Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging in Boston in Boston. Meanwhile, people who added foods rich in probiotics – a type of "good" bacteria – to their heart-healthy DASH diet achieved a significant reduction in their blood sugar levels, said Arjun Pandey, a student at Waterloo Collegiate Institute in Ontario, Canada. The ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Dietary Supplementation, Insulin Resistance, Pre-Diabetes, Diabetes Mellitus, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance

Low Blood Sugar Linked to Death Risk for Hospital Patients

Posted 19 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 17, 2016 – Hospital patients with low blood sugar may be at increased risk for death, a new study from Israel suggests. The study included nearly 3,000 patients with low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Nearly 32 percent died by the end of the follow-up period. For patients with moderate hypoglycemia, the risk of death was higher among those taking insulin than among those not taking insulin. For those with severe hypoglycemia, death risk was the same in both groups. The reason for hospital admission had no effect on the association between blood sugar levels and death risk, according to the study. It was published Nov. 17 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. "Hypoglycemia is common among hospitalized patients with and without diabetes mellitus. Our findings suggest that hypoglycemia, whether insulin-related or non-insulin related, is associated with short- ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Insulin, Diabetes, Type 1, Insulin Resistance, Pre-Diabetes, Diabetes Mellitus, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Intravenous Insulin Drip

Health Tip: Creating an Insulin Routine

Posted 15 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

-- If you take insulin, you'll need to create a comfortable routine to keep blood glucose under control. The American Diabetes Association explains: Type 1 diabetes typically needs at least two daily injections of two different types of insulin. Type 2 diabetics may need just one daily shot of insulin. Monitor closely how your blood glucose responds to different activities, such as exercise and eating. Find the insulin delivery method that's best for you, whether it's a pen, pump or syringe. Don't forget to change the injection site periodically. Talk to your doctor if you're not sure that your insulin dose is appropriate. Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Insulin, Diabetes, Type 1, Insulin Resistance, Pre-Diabetes, Diabetes Mellitus, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Gestational Diabetes

Tracking Blood Sugar in Pregnancy Might Lower Heart Defect Risk for Baby

Posted 14 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 14, 2016 – Increases in a woman's blood sugar levels during early pregnancy may affect her baby's risk of congenital heart defects, a new study suggests. Researchers led by Dr. Emmi Helle of Stanford University in California measured blood sugar levels of more than 19,000 pregnant women during their first trimester. For every 10 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) increase in blood sugar, the risk of delivering a baby with a congenital heart defect rose about 8 percent, the study found. The study couldn't prove cause-and-effect. But, the research team said it's the first study to show a link between a mother's blood sugar levels early in pregnancy and a baby's risk of heart defects. The association between elevated blood sugar in early pregnancy and heart defect risk was greater than the predictive ability of what's known as the "oral glucose tolerance test," Helle's team ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Pre-Diabetes, Delivery, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Brain Anomalies incl Congenital, Gestational Diabetes, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Weight-Loss Surgery Tied to Lower Heart Risks

Posted 14 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 14, 2016 – Weight-loss surgery may significantly reduce obese people's risk of heart failure, a new study indicates. Researchers compared more than 25,800 obese people who had weight-loss (bariatric) surgery with more than 13,700 obese people who tried to lose weight through a program of major lifestyle changes. Both groups had no history of heart failure. Four years after the start of treatment, the weight-loss surgery group had lost more weight, had a nearly 50 percent lower risk of heart failure, and had lower rates of heart rhythm problems, diabetes and high blood pressure than the lifestyle-changes group, the findings showed. Both groups had similar rates of heart attack and death, according to the study, which was scheduled for presentation Monday at the American Heart Association (AHA) annual meeting, in New Orleans. "Our study shows an association between obesity ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Type 2, Obesity, Hypertension, Heart Disease, Weight Loss, Insulin Resistance, Pre-Diabetes, Gastric Bypass Surgery, Diabetes Mellitus, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Gastrointestinal Surgery, Hypertensive Heart Disease

U.S. Heart Disease Rates Fell 20 Percent Since 1980s: Study

Posted 13 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, Nov. 13, 2016 – New research shows that cases of heart disease have dropped 20 percent in the United States in the last four decades. Experts credit the trend to better detection and prevention of risk factors that endanger heart health. "That means all the efforts are paying off," said senior researcher Michael Pencina. He is director of biostatistics for the Duke Clinical Research Institute at Duke University, in Durham, N.C. However, most major heart risk factors – bad cholesterol, high blood pressure and smoking – remain strong contributors to heart disease, showing that more can be done to protect patients, Pencina added. "Coronary disease was the size of a large pizza, but now it's a medium pizza," Pencina said. "But in terms of slices, what portion of the pizza you can attribute to the risk factors, it's about the same," he explained. "There is definitely room for ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Heart Disease, Insulin Resistance, Pre-Diabetes, Diabetes Mellitus, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance

Daily Can of Soda Boosts Odds for Prediabetes, Study Finds

Posted 10 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 10, 2016 – Drinking a can of sugary soda every day can dramatically heighten a person's risk of developing prediabetes, a "warning sign" condition that precedes full-blown type 2 diabetes, a new study reports. A person who drinks a daily can of sugar-sweetened beverage has a 46 percent increased risk of developing prediabetes, said senior researcher Nicola McKeown, a scientist with the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University in Boston. However, a can of diet soda every day does not boost prediabetes risk, the researchers found. The results show how regular sugar intake can batter a person's body on a cellular level, McKeown said. Cells require the hormone insulin to break down sugar into energy, she said. But too much sugar in the diet can overexpose the cells to insulin. "This constant spike in blood glucose over time leads to the ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Obesity, Insulin Resistance, Pre-Diabetes, Diabetes Mellitus, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance

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