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Why is succinylcholine contraindicated in burn victims over 24hrs?

Responses (1)

robo 28 Jul 2009

Succinylcholine administered to burns patients in the acute phase may result in severe hyperkalemia (high potassium levels) which may result in cardiac arrest.


Generic Name: succinylcholine chloride
Dosage Form: Injection

Succinylcholine is contraindicated in persons with personal or familial history of malignant hyperthermia, skeletal muscle myopathies, and known hypersensitivity to the drug. It is also contraindicated in patients after the acute phase of injury following major burns, multiple trauma, extensive denervation of skeletal muscle, or upper motor neuron injury, because succinylcholine administered to such individuals may result in severe hyperkalemia which may result in cardiac arrest. The risk of hyperkalemia in these patients increases over time and usually peaks at 7 to 10 days after the injury. The risk is dependent on the extent and location of the injury. The precise time of onset and the duration of the risk period are not known.

acetyl 2 Sep 2009

What about the use of succinylscoline in folks who are out of the acute phase of the burn say 50 plus years later? Do they run the same risk of hyperkalemia?

robo 15 Sep 2009

It does specifically say "burns patients in the acute phase" so 50 years on should be okay.

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