Skip to Content

How does spironolactone works?

Responses (1)

Rajive Goel 15 Mar 2012

Spironolactone is a diuretic, which is commonly referred to as a "water pill." It is known as an aldosterone antagonist, which means that it blocks aldosterone receptors. Aldosterone is a hormone that causes the body to retain water. By blocking it, spironolactone increases the amount of salt and water the kidneys remove from the blood. This extra salt and water is passed out through urine. By increasing the amount of water removed from the blood, spironolactone causes a decrease in blood volume. Because of this effect, the medication can lower blood pressure and also help with water retention.

Spironolactone is a "potassium-sparing" diuretic, which means that it does not cause low potassium levels in the blood, like many other diuretics. In fact, this medication usually increases potassium levels, an effect that can be used to treat low potassium levels (hypokalemia).

Hope the info helps? Take care, best wishes!

Further Information

Search for questions

Still looking for answers? Try searching for what you seek or ask your own question.

Similar Questions