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Is metformin an meo inhibitor?

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Anonymous 19 Jul 2010

Hello, no it is not an MOA inhibitor

I AM NOT A DOCTOR NOR PRETEND TO BE ONE AT ALL... I AM JUST A CARING INDIVIDUAL

METFORMIN
is part of a class of diabetes medications known as BIGUANIDE which are orally administered agents used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, which prevents the liver from breaking down glycogen into glucose and increases the sensitivity body tissues have to insulin medications. The drug works in several ways. For example, it decreases the amount of sugar (glucose) made by the liver. It can also decrease the amount of sugar absorbed into the body (from the diet) and can make insulin receptors more sensitive, helping the body respond better to its own insulin. All of these effects cause a decrease in blood sugar levels.

MAO
stands for Monoamine Oxidase, which is an enzyme responsible for metabolizing neurotransmitors such as seratonin and norepinephrine. This family of prescription medications are used primarily for treating depression, although one MAO Inhibitor, selegeline, is used to treat Parkinson's Disease.

The 4 MAO Inhibitors currently available and used to treat depression are:

Isocarboxazid (Brand name Marplan)
Phenelzine (Brand name Nardil)
Tranylcypromine (Brand name Parnate)
Selegeline (Brand name Emsam, a transdermal patch)

Take care and I hope this information helps you.

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