Skip to Content

I take glyburide and what do I do if my joints hurt?

Responses (1)

DzooBaby 21 Nov 2012

The hypoglycemic action of sulfonylureas may be potentiated by certain drugs including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents and other drugs that are highly protein bound, salicylates, sulfonamides, chloramphenicol, probenecid, coumarins, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, and beta adrenergic blocking agents. When such drugs are administered to a patient receiving MICRONASE (glyburide) , the patient should be observed closely for hypoglycemia. When such drugs are withdrawn from a patient receiving MICRONASE (glyburide) , the patient should be observed closely for loss of control.

Certain drugs tend to produce hyperglycemia and may lead to loss of control. These drugs include the thiazides and other diuretics, corticosteroids, phenothiazines, thyroid products, estrogens, oral contraceptives, phenytoin, nicotinic acid, sympathomimetics, calcium channel blocking drugs, and isoniazid. When such drugs are administered to a patient receiving MICRONASE (glyburide) , the patient should be closely observed for loss of control. When such drugs are withdrawn from a patient receiving MICRONASE (glyburide) , the patient should be observed closely for hypoglycemia.

So NSAIDS and aspirin can increase the risk of hypoglycemia. This doesnt mean you cannot take them, you just may need to monitor your blood sugar more often and be aware of signs and symptoms of low blood sugar (dizziness, headache, shakiness, hunger, nausea, lightheadedness etc). To be safest, acetaminophen would be the best OTC. You might ask your Dr about taking ibuprofen, naproxen or other NSAIDS if acetaminophen is not effective.

Drugs.com free discount card

Further Information

Search for questions

Still looking for answers? Try searching for what you seek or ask your own question.

Similar Questions