TOREM 2.5 TABLETS

Active substance: TORASEMIDE

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Patient Information Leaflet

Torem 2.5 mg
Tablets

Torasemide
Please read all of this leaflet
carefully before you start taking this
medicine.
• Keep this leaflet. You may need to
read it again.
• If you have any further questions, ask
your doctor or pharmacist.
• This medicine has been prescribed for
you. Do not pass it on to others. It may
harm them even if their symptoms are
the same as yours.
• If any of the side effects gets serious
or troublesome, or if you notice any
side effects not listed in this leaflet,
please tell your doctor or pharmacist.
In this leaflet:
1. What Torem is and
what it is used for
2. Before you take Torem
3. How to take Torem
4. Possible side effects
5. How to store Torem
6. Further information

1. What Torem is and
what it is used for
Torem contains a medicine called
torasemide. This belongs to a group of
medicines called ‘diuretics’ or ‘water
tablets’.
Torem is used to treat high blood pressure
(hypertension). It works by making you
pass more water (urine). This helps to
lower your blood pressure.

2. Before you take Torem
Do not take Torem if you are allergic
(hypersensitive) to:
• Torasemide or any of the other
ingredients of Torem (see Section 6:
Further information).
• Similar medicines called
‘sulphonylureas’. These are used to
treat diabetes (high blood sugar).
These medicines include
chlorpropamide, glibenclamide,
glipizide and tolbutamide.
Do not take Torem if any of these apply
to you. If you are not sure, talk to your
doctor or pharmacist before taking Torem.
Do not take Torem if:
• You have kidney problems (renal
failure).
• You have kidney problems that have
been caused by medicines.
• You have liver problems.
• You have low blood pressure
(hypotension).
• You have heart beat problems (cardiac
arrhythmia).
• You are taking an antibiotic called an
‘aminoglycoside’ or ‘cephalosporin’
(for an infection). These medicines
include streptomycin, gentamycin,
cephalexin and ceftriaxone.
See the section on
‘Taking other medicines’.
• You are pregnant or breast-feeding
a baby. See the section on
‘Pregnancy and breast-feeding’.
Do not take Torem if any of these apply to
you. If you are not sure, talk to your
doctor or pharmacist before taking Torem.
Take special care with Torem
Check with your doctor or pharmacist
before taking Torem if:

• You have low levels of potassium or
sodium in your blood (shown in blood
tests).
• You have a low volume of blood
(hypovolaemia).
• You have difficulty passing water
(urinating).
• You have gout or high levels of uric
acid in your blood.
• You have diabetes (diabetes mellitus).
If any of these apply to you, or if you are
not sure, talk to your doctor or pharmacist
before you take Torem.
Taking other medicines
Please tell your doctor or pharmacist if
you are taking or have recently taken any
other medicines. This includes medicines
that you buy without a prescription and
herbal medicines.
This is because Torem can affect the way
some other medicines work. Also some
other medicines can affect the way Torem
works.
Do not take Torem if you are already
taking an antibiotic called an
‘aminoglycoside’ or ‘cephalosporin’ (for
an infection). These medicines include
streptomycin, gentamycin, cephalexin and
ceftriaxone.
If this applies to you, ask your doctor or
pharmacist for advice.
It is particularly important to tell your
doctor or pharmacist if you are taking
any of the following medicines:
• Other medicines to treat high blood
pressure.

• Medicines called ‘ACE inhibitors’
(used to treat heart disease).
• Medicines like digoxin or digitoxin
(used to treat heart disease).
• Adrenaline (also called epinephrine)
or noradrenaline (also called
norepinephrine).
These are used to treat low blood
pressure.
• Cholestyramine, or other ‘ion-
exchange resins’ (used to treat high
levels of cholesterol in your blood).
• High doses of medicines called
‘salicylates’, such as aspirin.
• Medicines called ‘non-steroidal
anti-inflammatory drugs’ (NSAIDs).
These include indomethacin and
ibuprofen.
• Laxatives.
• Steroid medicines, such as
hydrocortisone, prednisolone
and dexamethasone.
• Medicines to relax your muscles
(muscle relaxants).
• Cisplatin (used to treat cancer).
• Lithium (used to treat mental health
problems).
• Probenecid (used to treat gout).
• Theophylline (used to treat asthma).
Pregnancy and breast-feeding
Do not take Torem if you are pregnant,
might become pregnant or are
breast-feeding. This is because it is not
known if Torem will affect your baby.
Driving and using machines
You may feel dizzy while taking Torem. If
this happens, do not drive or use any tools
or machines.
Important information about some of
the ingredients of Torem
This medicine contains lactose, which is a
type of sugar. If you have been told by
your doctor that you cannot tolerate or

 

digest some sugars (have an intolerance to
some sugars), talk to your doctor before
taking this medicine.

• Dry mouth.
• Some people may have difficulty
passing water (urinating).

3. How to take Torem

If any of the side effects become serious
or troublesome, or if you notice any side
effects not listed in this leaflet, please tell
your doctor or pharmacist.

Always take Torem exactly as your doctor
has told you. You should check with your
doctor or pharmacist if you are not sure.
• The usual dose for adults and elderly
people is one tablet (2.5 mg) once a day.
• Your doctor may increase the dose to
5 mg a day if needed.
If you take more Torem than you
should
• If you take more Torem than you
should, talk to a doctor or go to a
hospital straight away. Take the
medicine pack with you.
• If you take too many tablets, you may
pass a lot of urine, become sleepy, or
feel confused, faint or dizzy. You may
also have stomach upset.
If you forget to take Torem
• If you forget to take a dose, take it as
soon as you remember it.
• However, if it is nearly time for the
next dose, skip the missed dose.
• Do not take a double dose to make up
for a forgotten dose.
If someone else takes your Torem tablets
by mistake, they should talk to a doctor or
go to a hospital straight away.
If you have any further questions on the
use of this medicine, ask your doctor or
pharmacist.

5. How to store Torem
• Torem tablets do not need special
storage conditions.
• Keep out of the reach and sight of
children.
• Do not use Torem after the expiry date
printed on the pack.
• Do not throw away any left over
tablets. Instead, return them to your
pharmacist so that they can be
disposed of carefully. Only keep them
if your doctor tells
you to.

6. Further information
What Torem contains
The active substance in Torem tablets is
torasemide. Each tablet contains 2.5 mg
torasemide.
Other ingredients are lactose
monohydrate, maize starch, colloidal
silicon dioxide and magnesium stearate
(E572).

4. Possible side effects

What Torem looks like and contents of
the pack
Torem 2.5 mg tablets are round.
They are white to off-white round tablets
with the imprint “T 2.5” on one side and
plain on the other side.

Like all medicines, Torem can cause side
effects, although not everyone will get
them.

Torem tablets are supplied in blister packs
of 14, 28, 100 or 112 tablets.
Not all pack sizes may be marketed.

See your doctor as soon as possible if
you get the following side effects:
• Low levels of sodium or potassium in
your blood. This may cause headache,
feeling dizzy, fainting, feeling weak,
feeling sleepy, feeling confused, a loss
of appetite or cramps. Your doctor
may change your dose of Torem if this
happens.
• Problems with your circulation or
blood clots (these have only been seen
occasionally).
• Reduced numbers of red or white
blood cells or platelets in your blood.
This may make you feel tired, get
infections more easily, or bruise more
easily.

The Marketing Authorisation holder is:

Other possible side effects:
Blood
• An increase in the levels of certain
substances in your blood, including
sugar, uric acid and fats (lipids).
Your doctor may do blood tests from
time to time to make sure that Torem
is working safely.
Stomach and gut
• Stomach upset.
• Inflammation of the pancreas causing
pain in the stomach (pancreatitis).
• Changes in how your liver is working
(shown by blood tests).
Skin
• Skin rashes and itchy skin.
• Skin being more sensitive to the sun
(photo-sensitivity).
Eyes and ears
• Blurred eyesight.
• Ringing in the ears (tinnitus) and loss
of hearing.
Other
• Feeling numb or tingling in the legs or
arms.

MEDA Pharmaceuticals Ltd.
Skyway House, Parsonage Road
Takeley, Bishop’s Stortford
CM22 6PU, United Kingdom
The manufacturer responsible
for batch release is:
MEDA Pharma GmbH & Co. KG
Benzstrasse 1
61352 Bad Homburg,
Germany
MEDA Manufacturing GmbH,
Neurather Ring 1,
51063 Koeln (Cologne),
Germany
This leaflet was last approved in
January 2012 

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Source: Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency

Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided here is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. This information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States. The absence of a warning for a given drug or combination thereof in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. If you have questions about the substances you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

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