Medication Guide App

Ibandronic Acid Sandoz

Active Substance: ibandronic acid
Common Name: ibandronic acid
ATC Code: M05BA06
Marketing Authorisation Holder: Sandoz Pharmaceuticals GmbH
Active Substance: ibandronic acid
Status: Authorised
Authorisation Date: 2011-07-26
Therapeutic Area: Neoplasm Metastasis Breast Neoplasms Fractures, Bone
Pharmacotherapeutic Group: Prevention of skeletal events

Therapeutic Indication

Ibandronic acid Sandoz is indicated for the prevention of skeletal events (pathological fractures, bone complications requiring radiotherapy or surgery) in patients with breast cancer and bone metastases.

What is Ibandronic Acid Sandoz?

Ibandronic Acid Sandoz is a medicine that contains the active substance ibandronic acid. It is available as white tablets (50 mg).

Ibandronic Acid Sandoz is a ‘generic medicine’. This means that Ibandronic Acid Sandoz is similar to a ‘reference medicine’ already authorised in the European Union (EU). The reference medicine for Ibandronic Acid Sandoz is Bondronat. For more information on generic medicines, see the question-and-answer document.

What is Ibandronic Acid Sandoz used for?

Ibandronic Acid Sandoz is used to prevent ‘skeletal events’ (fractures [broken bones] or bone complications requiring treatment) in patients with breast cancer and bone metastases (when the cancer has spread to the bone).

The medicine can only be obtained with a prescription.

How is Ibandronic Acid Sandoz used?

The recommended dose is one tablet is taken once a day. The tablets must always be taken after the patient has fasted overnight for at least six hours and at least 30 minutes before the first food or drink of the day.

Ibandronic Acid Sandoz must be taken with a full glass of plain water (but not mineral water) while standing or sitting up, and they should not be chewed, sucked or crushed. The patient must also not lie down for one hour after taking the tablets.

 

How does Ibandronic Acid Sandoz work?

The active substance in Ibandronic Acid Sandoz, ibandronic acid, is a bisphosphonate. It stops the action of the osteoclasts, the cells in the body that are involved in breaking down the bone tissue. This leads to less bone loss. The reduction of bone loss helps to make bones less likely to break, which is useful in preventing fractures in cancer patients with bone metastases.

How has Ibandronic Acid Sandoz been studied?

Because Ibandronic Acid Sandoz is a generic medicine, studies in patients have been limited to tests to determine that it is bioequivalent to the reference medicine. Medicines are bioequivalent when they produce the same levels of the active substance in the body.

What are the benefit and risk of Ibandronic Acid Sandoz?

Because Ibandronic Acid Sandoz is a generic medicine and is bioequivalent to the reference medicine, its benefit and risk are taken as being the same as the reference medicine’s.

Why has Ibandronic Acid Sandoz been approved?

The CHMP concluded that, in accordance with EU requirements, Ibandronic Acid Sandoz has been shown to have comparable quality and to be bioequivalent to Bondronat. Therefore, the CHMP’s view was that, as for Bondronat, the benefit outweighs the identified risk. The Committee recommended that Ibandronic Acid Sandoz be given marketing authorisation.

Other information about Ibandronic Acid Sandoz:

The European Commission granted a marketing authorisation valid throughout the EU for Ibandronic Acid Sandoz to SANDOZ PHARMACEUTICALS GMBH on 26 July 2011. The marketing authorisation is valid for five years, after which it can be renewed.

For more information about treatment with Ibandronic Acid Sandoz, read the package leaflet (also part of the EPAR) or contact your doctor or pharmacist.

Source: European Medicines Agency

Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided here is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. This information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States. The absence of a warning for a given drug or combination thereof in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. If you have questions about the substances you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

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