Brompheniramine / codeine / phenylephrine Pregnancy and Breastfeeding Warnings

Brompheniramine / codeine / phenylephrine is also known as: BroveX PB C, BroveX PB CX, M-End PE, Poly-Tussin AC, TL-Hist CD

Brompheniramine / codeine / phenylephrine Pregnancy Warnings

Brompheniramine/codeine/phenylephrine has been assigned to pregnancy category C by the FDA. Animal studies failed to reveal evidence of teratogenicity. There are no controlled data in human pregnancy. The Collaborative Perinatal Project monitored 65 first trimester exposures to brompheniramine. Malformations were reported in 10 infants, a statistically significant association. In another 6509 live births, 172 mothers were exposed to Dimetapp (brompheniramine, phenylephrine and phenylpropanolamine). Five infants were born with congenital abnormalities resulting in a somewhat higher frequency than normal. Brompheniramine is only recommended for use during pregnancy when benefit outweigh risk. Codeine is the only narcotic analgesic which has shown a statistically significant association with teratogenicity (involving respiratory tract malformations) at the time of this writing. Like other narcotics, codeine rapidly crosses the placenta. Neonatal codeine withdrawal has occurred even in infants whose mothers were taking codeine at cough suppressant doses for as little as ten days prior to delivery. There are no controlled data in human pregnancy. Brompheniramine/codeine/phenylephrine is only recommended for use during pregnancy when there are no alternatives and benefit outweighs risk.

Brompheniramine / codeine / phenylephrine Breastfeeding Warnings

There are no data on the excretion of brompheniramine into human milk. Many H1-antagonists are excreted in human milk and in general, these medications are not recommended for use during breast-feeding. Side effects in breast-feeding infants may manifest as irritability, disturbed sleeping patterns, drowsiness, hyperexcitability, or excessive crying. Codeine is excreted into human milk in small amounts. The FDA issued a Public Health Advisory about a very rare, but serious, side effect in nursing infants whose mothers are taking codeine and are ultra-rapid metabolizers of codeine. Several small series and one small retrospective study suggest that codeine may be causative in episodes of apnea, bradycardia, and cyanosis in the first week of life. Codeine is nevertheless considered compatible with breast-feeding by the American Academy of Pediatrics. Small amounts of phenylephrine are secreted in breast milk. The manufacturer recommends that due to the potential for serious adverse reactions in nursing infants, a decision should be made to discontinue nursing or discontinue the drug, taking into account the importance of the drug to the mother.

The FDA issued a Public Health Advisory regarding a very rare, but serious, side effect. This may occur in nursing infants whose mothers are taking codeine and are ultra-rapid metabolizers of codeine. When codeine enters the body and is metabolized, it changes to morphine, which relieves pain. Many factors affect codeine metabolism, including a person's genetic make-up. Some people have a variation in a liver enzyme and may change codeine to morphine more rapidly and completely than other people. Nursing mothers taking codeine may also have higher morphine levels in their breast milk. These higher levels of morphine in breast milk may lead to life-threatening or fatal side effects in nursing babies. In most cases, it is not known if someone is an ultra-rapid metabolizer of codeine. When prescribing codeine-containing drugs to nursing mothers, it is recommended that the lowest effective dose be used for the shortest period of time. It is also recommended that the mother-infant pairs be closely monitored. There is an FDA cleared test for determining a patient's CYP450 2D6 genotype. The test is not routinely used in clinical practice but is available through a number of different laboratories. The results of this test predict that a person can convert codeine to morphine at a faster rate than average, resulting in higher morphine levels in the blood. When levels of morphine are too high, patients have an increased risk of adverse events.

See Also...

Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Wolters Kluwer Health and Drugs.com is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. In addition, the drug information contained herein may be time sensitive and should not be utilized as a reference resource beyond the date hereof. This material does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients, or recommend therapy. This drug information is a reference resource designed as supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill , knowledge, and judgement of healthcare practitioners in patient care. The absence of a warning for a given drug or combination thereof in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for any given patient. Multum Information Services, Inc. does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. Copyright 2000-2008 Multum Information Services, Inc. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist.

Hide
(web2)