Andrachne

Scientific Name(s): Andrachne cordifolia (wall. ex Decne.) Müll. Arg. and related species A. aspera Spreng. and A. phyllanthoides (Nutt.) Muell. Arg. Family: Euphorbiaceae (spurges)

Uses

One species has been used to treat eye inflammation in Yemen. Others are used to control pests.

Dosing

There is no clinical evidence to support dosage of andrachne.

Contraindications

Contraindications have not yet been identified.

Pregnancy/Lactation

Information regarding safety and efficacy in pregnancy and lactation is lacking. Avoid use.

Interactions

None well documented.

Adverse Reactions

No data.

Toxicology

No data.

Botany

The genus Andrachne has about 20 tropical American species and a few species in North Africa, Europe, and elsewhere. 1 These generally are shrubs and undershrubs, possessing many ascending leafy branches growing in tropical and warm regions. The leaves are oval or obovate, while the flowers are monoecious, pedicellate, and usually solitary in the axils. The fruit is dry, splitting into three 2-valved carpels. A. phyllanthoides is found in the dry hills and rocky barrens from Montana to Texas in May through October. 2 A. aspera is widely distributed throughout the Middle East.

Chemistry

Two bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids, cocsuline and pendulin, have been isolated from the roots of A. cordifolia . 3 Previously, the two alkaloids were reported only from the Menispermaceae family.

Uses and Pharmacology

The plants in the genus are used infrequently as medicinal plants in some countries. A. aspera roots are used for treating eye inflammation in Yemen, where pieces of the crushed roots are placed on the eyelids. 4 Some species also have pest-control properties.

Animal data

Research reveals little or no animal data regarding andrachne for its listed uses.

Clinical data

Research reveals little or no clinical data regarding andrachne for its listed uses.

Dosage

There is no clinical evidence to support dosage of andrachne.

Pregnancy/Lactation

Information regarding safety and efficacy in pregnancy and lactation is lacking. Avoid use.

Interactions

None well documented.

Adverse Reactions

Research reveals little or no information regarding adverse reactions with the use of this product.

Toxicology

Research reveals little or no information regarding toxicology with the use of this product.

Bibliography

1. Mabberley DJ. The Plant-Book . New York, NY: Cambridge University Press; 1987.
2. Fernald ML. Gray's Manual of Botany . 8th ed. Portland, OR: Dioscorides Press; 1950.
3. Khan MI, et al. Bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids from Andrachne cordifolia. Planta Med . 1983;47:191.
4. Ghazanfur SA. Handbook of Arabian Medicinal Plants . Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press; 1994.

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