Study Ties Infant Birth Weight to Mothers' Breast Cancer Risk

TUESDAY July 17, 2012 -- Women who give birth to large infants may have a more than twofold increased risk of developing breast cancer, according to a new study.

Having a large baby may be associated with higher concentrations of certain pregnancy hormones that boost the chances of breast cancer development and progression, the researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston suggested.

The team analyzed data from two long-term U.S. studies and found that women who gave birth to the largest babies were 2.5 times more likely to develop breast cancer than those who gave birth to the smallest babies.

The increased risk associated with a baby's weight was independent of the mother's birth weight and traditional breast cancer risk factors, the investigators found.

In addition, the study authors noted, women who gave birth to the largest babies were 25 percent more likely to have higher concentrations of hormones that affect infant birth weight and breast cancer risk.

The news from the study, which is published in the July 17 issue of the journal PLoS One, may help improve prediction and prevention of breast cancer decades before it appears, the researchers said.

"Women can't alter their pregnancy hormones, but can take steps to increase their general protection against breast cancer," study lead author Dr. Radek Bukowski, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology, said in a university news release.

Breast-feeding, having more than one child, healthy eating and exercising have been shown to reduce breast cancer risk, Bukowski noted.

The researchers pointed out that while the study found an association between hormonal levels and infant birth weight and maternal breast cancer risk, it did not prove a cause-and-effect relationship. They added that more study is needed.

More information

The U.S. National Cancer Institute has more about breast cancer prevention.

Posted: July 2012


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