Myozyme

Generic Name: alglucosidase alfa (injection) (AL gloo KOE si dase AL fa)
Brand Names: Lumizyme, Myozyme

What is Myozyme?

Myozyme (alglucosidase alfa) contains an enzyme that naturally occurs in the body in healthy people. Some people lack this enzyme because of a genetic disorder. Myozyme helps replace this missing enzyme in such people.

Myozyme is used to treat a glycogen storage disorder called Pompe disease, (also called GAA deficiency) in adults and children who are at least 8 years old.

Myozyme may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Important information

Myozyme is available only under a special program called ACE. Under this program, only registered doctors and pharmacists can prescribe and dispense Myozyme. You must be registered in the program and sign documents stating that you understand the risks of using this medication and the possibility of severe allergic reaction. Ask your doctor or call the drug maker if you have questions about the program or the written requirements.

Slideshow: View Frightful (But Dead Serious) Drug Side Effects

Before receiving Myozyme, tell your doctor if you have heart disease, lung disease or a breathing disorder, or if you are allergic to mice, hamsters, or drug products made with "murine" proteins.

Before each injection, tell your doctor if you have recently been sick with a cold, flu, or other illness. Some people receiving an injection of Myozyme have had a reaction to the infusion. This type of reaction can occur when the medicine is injected into the vein, or as long as 3 hours after the injection.

Tell your caregivers or get emergency medical help right away if you have any signs of a severe allergic reaction while using Myozyme, such as feeling restless, nervous, dizzy, numb, tingly, hot or cold, sweaty, nauseated, or lightheaded, or if you have trouble breathing, chest pain or tightness, fast or slow heart rate, hives, severe skin rash, seizure (convulsions), or swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Before receiving Myozyme

You should not receive Myozyme if you are allergic to alglucosidase alfa.

To make sure you can safely use Myozyme, tell your doctor if you have other medical conditions, especially:

  • heart disease;

  • lung disease or breathing disorder;

  • if you are allergic to mice, hamsters, or drug products made with "murine" proteins.

FDA pregnancy category B. Myozyme is not expected to harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether alglucosidase alfa passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not receive Myozyme without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

See also: Pregnancy and breastfeeding warnings (in more detail)

Your name may be listed on the Pompe Registry. This is to track the progress of your disease and the outcome of your treatment with Myozyme.

How is Myozyme given?

Myozyme is injected into a vein through an IV using an infusion pump. You will receive this injection in a clinic or hospital setting. Myozyme must be given slowly, and the IV infusion can take up to 4 hours to complete.

Myozyme is usually given once every 2 weeks.

Before each injection, tell your doctor if you have recently been sick with a cold, flu, or other illness.

To be sure Myozyme is helping your condition and is not causing harmful effects, your blood will need to be tested every 3 months for 2 years and then once every year after that. Visit your doctor regularly.

Myozyme is available only under a special program called ACE. Under this program, only registered doctors and pharmacists can prescribe and dispense Myozyme. You must be registered in the program and sign documents stating that you understand the risks of using this medication and the possibility of severe allergic reaction. Ask your doctor or call the drug maker if you have questions about the program or the written requirements.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Call your doctor for instructions if you miss an appointment for your Myozyme injection.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

What should I avoid?

Follow your doctor's instructions about any restrictions on food, beverages, or activity.

Myozyme side effects

Some people receiving an injection of Myozyme have had a reaction to the infusion. This type of reaction can occur when the medicine is injected into the vein, or as long as 3 hours after the injection. Tell your caregivers or get emergency medical help right away if you have any of these signs of a severe allergic reaction to Myozyme:

  • feeling like you might pass out, even while lying down;

  • feeling restless, nervous, dizzy, or nauseated;

  • pale skin, redness under your skin, sweating, feeling hot or cold;

  • fast or slow heart rate;

  • pain or tightness in your chest or throat;

  • wheezing, trouble breathing;

  • cold hands, blue lips;

  • back pain;

  • numbness, warmth, redness, or tingly feeling;

  • seizure (convulsions);

  • hives, severe skin rash; or

  • swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

  • pain or fullness in your ear, problems with hearing;

  • skin ulcers;

  • fast, slow, or uneven heartbeats;

  • urinating less than usual or not at all;

  • weak pulse, fainting, slow breathing (breathing may stop); or

  • chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, sweating, general ill feeling.

Less serious Myozyme side effects may include:

  • mild skin rash or itching;

  • diarrhea, constipation, stomach pain, upset stomach, vomiting;

  • sore throat, neck pain;

  • pain or swelling in your arms or legs; or

  • pain, swelling, burning, or irritation around the IV needle.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Side effects (in more detail)

What other drugs will affect Myozyme?

There may be other drugs that can interact with Myozyme. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

Where can I get more information?

  • Your doctor or pharmacist can provide more information about Myozyme.
  • Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects.

Copyright 1996-2014 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 4.01. Revision Date: 2012-08-22, 9:06:50 AM.

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