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voriconazole

Pronunciation

Generic Name: voriconazole (vor i KON a zole)
Brand Name: VFEND

What is voriconazole?

Voriconazole is an antifungal medication.

Voriconazole is used to treat infections caused by yeast or other types of fungus.

Voriconazole may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about voriconazole?

Do not use voriconazole if you are pregnant. It could harm the unborn baby.

There are many other medicines that can cause serious or life-threatening drug interactions with voriconazole. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use.

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Before taking voriconazole, tell your doctor if you have heart rhythm problems, an electrolyte imbalance, liver or kidney disease, or a history of allergy to other antifungal medications such as fluconazole (Diflucan), ketoconazole (Nizoral), or itraconazole (Sporanox).

Take this medication for the full prescribed length of time. Your symptoms may improve before the infection is completely cleared. Skipping doses may also increase your risk of further infection that is resistant to antibiotics. Voriconazole will not treat a viral infection such as the common cold or flu.

Voriconazole can cause problems with your vision. If you use this medicine for more than 28 days, you may need to have your eyes checked.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking voriconazole?

You should not take this medication if you are allergic to voriconazole, or if you are taking any of the following drugs:

  • carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Equetro, Tegretol);

  • cisapride (Propulsid);

  • pimozide (Orap);

  • quinidine (Quin-G);

  • sirolimus (Rapamune);

  • mephobarbital (Mebaral) or phenobarbital (Solfoton);

  • ritonavir (Norvir, Kaletra) in high doses;

  • rifabutin (Mycobutin) or rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane, Rifater);

  • St. John's wort; or

  • an ergot medicine such as ergotamine (Ergomar, Cafergot, Ercaf, Wigraine, others) or dihydroergotamine (D.H.E., Migranal).

The drugs listed above can cause dangerous serious or life-threatening drug interactions with voriconazole. Tell your doctor about all other medicines you are using.

To make sure you can safely take voriconazole, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

  • heart rhythm problems;

  • a metabolic disorder such as high or low levels of calcium, potassium, or magnesium;

  • liver disease;

  • kidney disease; or

  • a history of allergy to other antifungal medications such as fluconazole (Diflucan), ketoconazole (Nizoral), or itraconazole (Sporanox).

Voriconazole tablets contain lactose. Before taking a voriconazole tablet, tell your doctor if you have a hereditary form of galactose intolerance, Lapp lactase deficiency, or glucose-galactose malabsorption.

FDA pregnancy category D. Do not use voriconazole if you are pregnant. It could harm the unborn baby. Use effective birth control, and tell your doctor if you become pregnant during treatment.

It is not known if voriconazole passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How should I take voriconazole?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Take voriconazole at least one hour before or after eating a meal.

Shake the oral suspension (liquid) well just before you measure a dose. Measure the liquid with a special dose-measuring spoon or medicine cup, not with a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

Do not mix the oral suspension with any other medicine or liquid.

Take this medication for the full prescribed length of time. Your symptoms may improve before the infection is completely cleared. Skipping doses may also increase your risk of further infection that is resistant to antibiotics. Voriconazole will not treat a viral infection such as the common cold or flu.

To be sure voriconazole is helping your condition, your blood will need to be tested on a regular basis. Your kidney or liver function may also need to be tested. Visit your doctor regularly.

Voriconazole can cause problems with your vision. If you use this medicine for more than 28 days, you may need to have your eyes checked.

Store voriconazole tablets at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Store the oral liquid at room temperature for up to 14 days. Throw away any unused liquid after 14 days.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include vision problems, excessive mouth watering, enlarged pupils, weakness, loss of balance, shortness of breath, or seizure (convulsions).

What should I avoid while taking voriconazole?

Voriconazole may cause changes in vision including blurred vision and sensitivity to light. Wear sunglasses during the day to protect your eyes from bright light. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to have clear vision.

Avoid exposure to sunlight or tanning beds. Voriconazole can make you sunburn more easily. Wear protective clothing and use sunscreen (SPF 30 or higher) when you are outdoors.

Voriconazole side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

  • sudden behavior changes, problems with thinking or speech;

  • upper stomach pain, itching, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);

  • urinating less than usual or not at all;

  • bone pain, swelling;

  • uneven heart rate, chest pain, general ill feeling; or

  • severe skin reaction -- fever, sore throat, swelling in your face or tongue, burning in your eyes, skin pain, followed by a red or purple skin rash that spreads (especially in the face or upper body) and causes blistering and peeling.

Less serious side effects may include:

  • vision problems such as blurred vision, eyes being more sensitive to light;

  • fever;

  • mild nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea;

  • headache; or

  • swelling in your hands, ankles, or feet.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Side effects (in more detail)

Voriconazole dosing information

Usual Adult Dose for Aspergillosis -- Invasive:

Loading Dose: 6 mg/kg IV every 12 hours for 2 doses

Maintenance Dose:
IV:
Invasive aspergillosis and serious fungal infections due to Fusarium species and Scedosporium apiospermum: 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

Comments:
-Therapy should start with the IV loading dose on Day 1 followed by the maintenance dose.
-IV therapy should continue for at least 7 days.
-Once the patient has clinically improved and can tolerate oral medication, oral voriconazole may be used.

Candidemia in nonneutropenic patients and other deep tissue Candida infections: 3 to 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

Comments:
-In clinical trials, candidemia was treated using 3 mg/kg IV every 12 hours as primary therapy, while other deep tissue Candida infections were treated using 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours as salvage therapy; appropriate dose should be based on the nature and severity of the infection.

Oral:
Less than 40 kg: 100 mg orally every 12 hours
40 kg or more: 200 mg orally every 12 hours

Duration of Therapy:
-Invasive aspergillosis: In a clinical trial, the median duration of IV therapy was 10 days (range 2 to 85 days) and of oral therapy was 76 days (range 2 to 232 days).
-Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) guidelines for invasive aspergillosis: At least 6 to 12 weeks; in immunosuppressed patients, throughout immunosuppression and until lesions resolve
-Candidemia in nonneutropenic patients and other deep tissue Candida infections: At least 14 days after symptoms resolve or after last positive culture, whichever is longer

Uses: Invasive aspergillosis; candidemia in nonneutropenic patients; disseminated Candida infections in skin; Candida infections in abdomen, kidney, bladder wall, wounds; serious fungal infections due to Fusarium species and S apiospermum in patients intolerant of (or refractory to) other therapy

IDSA guidelines for empirical and preemptive therapy:
-IV: 6 mg/kg IV every 12 hours for 2 doses, then 3 mg/kg IV every 12 hours
-Oral: 200 mg orally every 12 hours

Usual Adult Dose for Candidemia:

Loading Dose: 6 mg/kg IV every 12 hours for 2 doses

Maintenance Dose:
IV:
Invasive aspergillosis and serious fungal infections due to Fusarium species and Scedosporium apiospermum: 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

Comments:
-Therapy should start with the IV loading dose on Day 1 followed by the maintenance dose.
-IV therapy should continue for at least 7 days.
-Once the patient has clinically improved and can tolerate oral medication, oral voriconazole may be used.

Candidemia in nonneutropenic patients and other deep tissue Candida infections: 3 to 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

Comments:
-In clinical trials, candidemia was treated using 3 mg/kg IV every 12 hours as primary therapy, while other deep tissue Candida infections were treated using 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours as salvage therapy; appropriate dose should be based on the nature and severity of the infection.

Oral:
Less than 40 kg: 100 mg orally every 12 hours
40 kg or more: 200 mg orally every 12 hours

Duration of Therapy:
-Invasive aspergillosis: In a clinical trial, the median duration of IV therapy was 10 days (range 2 to 85 days) and of oral therapy was 76 days (range 2 to 232 days).
-Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) guidelines for invasive aspergillosis: At least 6 to 12 weeks; in immunosuppressed patients, throughout immunosuppression and until lesions resolve
-Candidemia in nonneutropenic patients and other deep tissue Candida infections: At least 14 days after symptoms resolve or after last positive culture, whichever is longer

Uses: Invasive aspergillosis; candidemia in nonneutropenic patients; disseminated Candida infections in skin; Candida infections in abdomen, kidney, bladder wall, wounds; serious fungal infections due to Fusarium species and S apiospermum in patients intolerant of (or refractory to) other therapy

IDSA guidelines for empirical and preemptive therapy:
-IV: 6 mg/kg IV every 12 hours for 2 doses, then 3 mg/kg IV every 12 hours
-Oral: 200 mg orally every 12 hours

Usual Adult Dose for Fungal Pneumonia:

Loading Dose: 6 mg/kg IV every 12 hours for 2 doses

Maintenance Dose:
IV:
Invasive aspergillosis and serious fungal infections due to Fusarium species and Scedosporium apiospermum: 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

Comments:
-Therapy should start with the IV loading dose on Day 1 followed by the maintenance dose.
-IV therapy should continue for at least 7 days.
-Once the patient has clinically improved and can tolerate oral medication, oral voriconazole may be used.

Candidemia in nonneutropenic patients and other deep tissue Candida infections: 3 to 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

Comments:
-In clinical trials, candidemia was treated using 3 mg/kg IV every 12 hours as primary therapy, while other deep tissue Candida infections were treated using 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours as salvage therapy; appropriate dose should be based on the nature and severity of the infection.

Oral:
Less than 40 kg: 100 mg orally every 12 hours
40 kg or more: 200 mg orally every 12 hours

Duration of Therapy:
-Invasive aspergillosis: In a clinical trial, the median duration of IV therapy was 10 days (range 2 to 85 days) and of oral therapy was 76 days (range 2 to 232 days).
-Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) guidelines for invasive aspergillosis: At least 6 to 12 weeks; in immunosuppressed patients, throughout immunosuppression and until lesions resolve
-Candidemia in nonneutropenic patients and other deep tissue Candida infections: At least 14 days after symptoms resolve or after last positive culture, whichever is longer

Uses: Invasive aspergillosis; candidemia in nonneutropenic patients; disseminated Candida infections in skin; Candida infections in abdomen, kidney, bladder wall, wounds; serious fungal infections due to Fusarium species and S apiospermum in patients intolerant of (or refractory to) other therapy

IDSA guidelines for empirical and preemptive therapy:
-IV: 6 mg/kg IV every 12 hours for 2 doses, then 3 mg/kg IV every 12 hours
-Oral: 200 mg orally every 12 hours

Usual Adult Dose for Pseudoallescheriosis:

Loading Dose: 6 mg/kg IV every 12 hours for 2 doses

Maintenance Dose:
IV:
Invasive aspergillosis and serious fungal infections due to Fusarium species and Scedosporium apiospermum: 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

Comments:
-Therapy should start with the IV loading dose on Day 1 followed by the maintenance dose.
-IV therapy should continue for at least 7 days.
-Once the patient has clinically improved and can tolerate oral medication, oral voriconazole may be used.

Candidemia in nonneutropenic patients and other deep tissue Candida infections: 3 to 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

Comments:
-In clinical trials, candidemia was treated using 3 mg/kg IV every 12 hours as primary therapy, while other deep tissue Candida infections were treated using 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours as salvage therapy; appropriate dose should be based on the nature and severity of the infection.

Oral:
Less than 40 kg: 100 mg orally every 12 hours
40 kg or more: 200 mg orally every 12 hours

Duration of Therapy:
-Invasive aspergillosis: In a clinical trial, the median duration of IV therapy was 10 days (range 2 to 85 days) and of oral therapy was 76 days (range 2 to 232 days).
-Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) guidelines for invasive aspergillosis: At least 6 to 12 weeks; in immunosuppressed patients, throughout immunosuppression and until lesions resolve
-Candidemia in nonneutropenic patients and other deep tissue Candida infections: At least 14 days after symptoms resolve or after last positive culture, whichever is longer

Uses: Invasive aspergillosis; candidemia in nonneutropenic patients; disseminated Candida infections in skin; Candida infections in abdomen, kidney, bladder wall, wounds; serious fungal infections due to Fusarium species and S apiospermum in patients intolerant of (or refractory to) other therapy

IDSA guidelines for empirical and preemptive therapy:
-IV: 6 mg/kg IV every 12 hours for 2 doses, then 3 mg/kg IV every 12 hours
-Oral: 200 mg orally every 12 hours

Usual Adult Dose for Systemic Fungal Infection:

Loading Dose: 6 mg/kg IV every 12 hours for 2 doses

Maintenance Dose:
IV:
Invasive aspergillosis and serious fungal infections due to Fusarium species and Scedosporium apiospermum: 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

Comments:
-Therapy should start with the IV loading dose on Day 1 followed by the maintenance dose.
-IV therapy should continue for at least 7 days.
-Once the patient has clinically improved and can tolerate oral medication, oral voriconazole may be used.

Candidemia in nonneutropenic patients and other deep tissue Candida infections: 3 to 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

Comments:
-In clinical trials, candidemia was treated using 3 mg/kg IV every 12 hours as primary therapy, while other deep tissue Candida infections were treated using 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours as salvage therapy; appropriate dose should be based on the nature and severity of the infection.

Oral:
Less than 40 kg: 100 mg orally every 12 hours
40 kg or more: 200 mg orally every 12 hours

Duration of Therapy:
-Invasive aspergillosis: In a clinical trial, the median duration of IV therapy was 10 days (range 2 to 85 days) and of oral therapy was 76 days (range 2 to 232 days).
-Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) guidelines for invasive aspergillosis: At least 6 to 12 weeks; in immunosuppressed patients, throughout immunosuppression and until lesions resolve
-Candidemia in nonneutropenic patients and other deep tissue Candida infections: At least 14 days after symptoms resolve or after last positive culture, whichever is longer

Uses: Invasive aspergillosis; candidemia in nonneutropenic patients; disseminated Candida infections in skin; Candida infections in abdomen, kidney, bladder wall, wounds; serious fungal infections due to Fusarium species and S apiospermum in patients intolerant of (or refractory to) other therapy

IDSA guidelines for empirical and preemptive therapy:
-IV: 6 mg/kg IV every 12 hours for 2 doses, then 3 mg/kg IV every 12 hours
-Oral: 200 mg orally every 12 hours

Usual Adult Dose for Cutaneous Fungal Infection:

Loading Dose: 6 mg/kg IV every 12 hours for 2 doses

Maintenance Dose:
IV:
Invasive aspergillosis and serious fungal infections due to Fusarium species and Scedosporium apiospermum: 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

Comments:
-Therapy should start with the IV loading dose on Day 1 followed by the maintenance dose.
-IV therapy should continue for at least 7 days.
-Once the patient has clinically improved and can tolerate oral medication, oral voriconazole may be used.

Candidemia in nonneutropenic patients and other deep tissue Candida infections: 3 to 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

Comments:
-In clinical trials, candidemia was treated using 3 mg/kg IV every 12 hours as primary therapy, while other deep tissue Candida infections were treated using 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours as salvage therapy; appropriate dose should be based on the nature and severity of the infection.

Oral:
Less than 40 kg: 100 mg orally every 12 hours
40 kg or more: 200 mg orally every 12 hours

Duration of Therapy:
-Invasive aspergillosis: In a clinical trial, the median duration of IV therapy was 10 days (range 2 to 85 days) and of oral therapy was 76 days (range 2 to 232 days).
-Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) guidelines for invasive aspergillosis: At least 6 to 12 weeks; in immunosuppressed patients, throughout immunosuppression and until lesions resolve
-Candidemia in nonneutropenic patients and other deep tissue Candida infections: At least 14 days after symptoms resolve or after last positive culture, whichever is longer

Uses: Invasive aspergillosis; candidemia in nonneutropenic patients; disseminated Candida infections in skin; Candida infections in abdomen, kidney, bladder wall, wounds; serious fungal infections due to Fusarium species and S apiospermum in patients intolerant of (or refractory to) other therapy

IDSA guidelines for empirical and preemptive therapy:
-IV: 6 mg/kg IV every 12 hours for 2 doses, then 3 mg/kg IV every 12 hours
-Oral: 200 mg orally every 12 hours

Usual Adult Dose for Fungal Infection -- Disseminated:

Loading Dose: 6 mg/kg IV every 12 hours for 2 doses

Maintenance Dose:
IV:
Invasive aspergillosis and serious fungal infections due to Fusarium species and Scedosporium apiospermum: 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

Comments:
-Therapy should start with the IV loading dose on Day 1 followed by the maintenance dose.
-IV therapy should continue for at least 7 days.
-Once the patient has clinically improved and can tolerate oral medication, oral voriconazole may be used.

Candidemia in nonneutropenic patients and other deep tissue Candida infections: 3 to 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

Comments:
-In clinical trials, candidemia was treated using 3 mg/kg IV every 12 hours as primary therapy, while other deep tissue Candida infections were treated using 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours as salvage therapy; appropriate dose should be based on the nature and severity of the infection.

Oral:
Less than 40 kg: 100 mg orally every 12 hours
40 kg or more: 200 mg orally every 12 hours

Duration of Therapy:
-Invasive aspergillosis: In a clinical trial, the median duration of IV therapy was 10 days (range 2 to 85 days) and of oral therapy was 76 days (range 2 to 232 days).
-Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) guidelines for invasive aspergillosis: At least 6 to 12 weeks; in immunosuppressed patients, throughout immunosuppression and until lesions resolve
-Candidemia in nonneutropenic patients and other deep tissue Candida infections: At least 14 days after symptoms resolve or after last positive culture, whichever is longer

Uses: Invasive aspergillosis; candidemia in nonneutropenic patients; disseminated Candida infections in skin; Candida infections in abdomen, kidney, bladder wall, wounds; serious fungal infections due to Fusarium species and S apiospermum in patients intolerant of (or refractory to) other therapy

IDSA guidelines for empirical and preemptive therapy:
-IV: 6 mg/kg IV every 12 hours for 2 doses, then 3 mg/kg IV every 12 hours
-Oral: 200 mg orally every 12 hours

Usual Adult Dose for Fungal Meningitis:

Loading Dose: 6 mg/kg IV every 12 hours for 2 doses

Maintenance Dose:
IV:
Invasive aspergillosis and serious fungal infections due to Fusarium species and Scedosporium apiospermum: 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

Comments:
-Therapy should start with the IV loading dose on Day 1 followed by the maintenance dose.
-IV therapy should continue for at least 7 days.
-Once the patient has clinically improved and can tolerate oral medication, oral voriconazole may be used.

Candidemia in nonneutropenic patients and other deep tissue Candida infections: 3 to 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

Comments:
-In clinical trials, candidemia was treated using 3 mg/kg IV every 12 hours as primary therapy, while other deep tissue Candida infections were treated using 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours as salvage therapy; appropriate dose should be based on the nature and severity of the infection.

Oral:
Less than 40 kg: 100 mg orally every 12 hours
40 kg or more: 200 mg orally every 12 hours

Duration of Therapy:
-Invasive aspergillosis: In a clinical trial, the median duration of IV therapy was 10 days (range 2 to 85 days) and of oral therapy was 76 days (range 2 to 232 days).
-Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) guidelines for invasive aspergillosis: At least 6 to 12 weeks; in immunosuppressed patients, throughout immunosuppression and until lesions resolve
-Candidemia in nonneutropenic patients and other deep tissue Candida infections: At least 14 days after symptoms resolve or after last positive culture, whichever is longer

Uses: Invasive aspergillosis; candidemia in nonneutropenic patients; disseminated Candida infections in skin; Candida infections in abdomen, kidney, bladder wall, wounds; serious fungal infections due to Fusarium species and S apiospermum in patients intolerant of (or refractory to) other therapy

IDSA guidelines for empirical and preemptive therapy:
-IV: 6 mg/kg IV every 12 hours for 2 doses, then 3 mg/kg IV every 12 hours
-Oral: 200 mg orally every 12 hours

Usual Adult Dose for Fusariosis:

Loading Dose: 6 mg/kg IV every 12 hours for 2 doses

Maintenance Dose:
IV:
Invasive aspergillosis and serious fungal infections due to Fusarium species and Scedosporium apiospermum: 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

Comments:
-Therapy should start with the IV loading dose on Day 1 followed by the maintenance dose.
-IV therapy should continue for at least 7 days.
-Once the patient has clinically improved and can tolerate oral medication, oral voriconazole may be used.

Candidemia in nonneutropenic patients and other deep tissue Candida infections: 3 to 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

Comments:
-In clinical trials, candidemia was treated using 3 mg/kg IV every 12 hours as primary therapy, while other deep tissue Candida infections were treated using 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours as salvage therapy; appropriate dose should be based on the nature and severity of the infection.

Oral:
Less than 40 kg: 100 mg orally every 12 hours
40 kg or more: 200 mg orally every 12 hours

Duration of Therapy:
-Invasive aspergillosis: In a clinical trial, the median duration of IV therapy was 10 days (range 2 to 85 days) and of oral therapy was 76 days (range 2 to 232 days).
-Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) guidelines for invasive aspergillosis: At least 6 to 12 weeks; in immunosuppressed patients, throughout immunosuppression and until lesions resolve
-Candidemia in nonneutropenic patients and other deep tissue Candida infections: At least 14 days after symptoms resolve or after last positive culture, whichever is longer

Uses: Invasive aspergillosis; candidemia in nonneutropenic patients; disseminated Candida infections in skin; Candida infections in abdomen, kidney, bladder wall, wounds; serious fungal infections due to Fusarium species and S apiospermum in patients intolerant of (or refractory to) other therapy

IDSA guidelines for empirical and preemptive therapy:
-IV: 6 mg/kg IV every 12 hours for 2 doses, then 3 mg/kg IV every 12 hours
-Oral: 200 mg orally every 12 hours

Usual Adult Dose for Esophageal Candidiasis:

Less than 40 kg: 100 mg orally every 12 hours
40 kg or more: 200 mg orally every 12 hours

Duration of therapy: At least 14 days and at least 7 days after symptoms resolve

Usual Adult Dose for Blastomycosis:

IDSA guidelines for CNS disease: 200 to 400 mg orally twice a day
Duration of therapy: At least 12 months and until CSF abnormalities resolve

Comments:
-An oral azole is recommended for step-down therapy after an initial regimen of liposomal amphotericin B.
-Not approved by US FDA.

Case report (n=1)
Cerebral blastomycosis: 200 mg orally twice a day

Comments:
-Dose was increased to 300 mg orally twice a day after 4 weeks in an attempt to achieve a higher CNS level.
-Therapy continued for 12 months.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Aspergillosis -- Invasive:

2 to 11 years:
American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations: 9 mg/kg IV or orally every 12 hours
Maximum dose: 350 mg/dose

IDSA guidelines for invasive aspergillosis: 5 to 7 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

12 years or older:
Loading Dose: 6 mg/kg IV every 12 hours for 2 doses

Maintenance Dose:
IV:
Invasive aspergillosis and serious fungal infections due to Fusarium species and S apiospermum: 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

Comments:
-Therapy should start with the IV loading dose on Day 1 followed by the maintenance dose.
-IV therapy should continue for at least 7 days.
-Once the patient has clinically improved and can tolerate oral medication, oral voriconazole may be used.

Candidemia in nonneutropenic patients and other deep tissue Candida infections: 3 to 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

Comments:
-In clinical trials, candidemia was treated using 3 mg/kg IV every 12 hours as primary therapy, while other deep tissue Candida infections were treated using 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours as salvage therapy; appropriate dose should be based on the nature and severity of the infection.

Oral:
Less than 40 kg: 100 mg orally every 12 hours
40 kg or more: 200 mg orally every 12 hours

Duration of Therapy:
-Invasive aspergillosis: In a clinical trial, the median duration of IV therapy was 10 days (range 2 to 85 days) and of oral therapy was 76 days (range 2 to 232 days).
-IDSA guidelines for invasive aspergillosis: At least 6 to 12 weeks; in immunosuppressed patients, throughout immunosuppression and until lesions resolve
-Candidemia in nonneutropenic patients and other deep tissue Candida infections: At least 14 days after symptoms resolve or after last positive culture, whichever is longer

Uses: Invasive aspergillosis; candidemia in nonneutropenic patients; disseminated Candida infections in skin; Candida infections in abdomen, kidney, bladder wall, wounds; serious fungal infections due to Fusarium species and S apiospermum in patients intolerant of (or refractory to) other therapy

Usual Pediatric Dose for Candidemia:

2 to 11 years:
American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations: 9 mg/kg IV or orally every 12 hours
Maximum dose: 350 mg/dose

IDSA guidelines for invasive aspergillosis: 5 to 7 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

12 years or older:
Loading Dose: 6 mg/kg IV every 12 hours for 2 doses

Maintenance Dose:
IV:
Invasive aspergillosis and serious fungal infections due to Fusarium species and S apiospermum: 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

Comments:
-Therapy should start with the IV loading dose on Day 1 followed by the maintenance dose.
-IV therapy should continue for at least 7 days.
-Once the patient has clinically improved and can tolerate oral medication, oral voriconazole may be used.

Candidemia in nonneutropenic patients and other deep tissue Candida infections: 3 to 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

Comments:
-In clinical trials, candidemia was treated using 3 mg/kg IV every 12 hours as primary therapy, while other deep tissue Candida infections were treated using 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours as salvage therapy; appropriate dose should be based on the nature and severity of the infection.

Oral:
Less than 40 kg: 100 mg orally every 12 hours
40 kg or more: 200 mg orally every 12 hours

Duration of Therapy:
-Invasive aspergillosis: In a clinical trial, the median duration of IV therapy was 10 days (range 2 to 85 days) and of oral therapy was 76 days (range 2 to 232 days).
-IDSA guidelines for invasive aspergillosis: At least 6 to 12 weeks; in immunosuppressed patients, throughout immunosuppression and until lesions resolve
-Candidemia in nonneutropenic patients and other deep tissue Candida infections: At least 14 days after symptoms resolve or after last positive culture, whichever is longer

Uses: Invasive aspergillosis; candidemia in nonneutropenic patients; disseminated Candida infections in skin; Candida infections in abdomen, kidney, bladder wall, wounds; serious fungal infections due to Fusarium species and S apiospermum in patients intolerant of (or refractory to) other therapy

Usual Pediatric Dose for Fungal Pneumonia:

2 to 11 years:
American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations: 9 mg/kg IV or orally every 12 hours
Maximum dose: 350 mg/dose

IDSA guidelines for invasive aspergillosis: 5 to 7 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

12 years or older:
Loading Dose: 6 mg/kg IV every 12 hours for 2 doses

Maintenance Dose:
IV:
Invasive aspergillosis and serious fungal infections due to Fusarium species and S apiospermum: 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

Comments:
-Therapy should start with the IV loading dose on Day 1 followed by the maintenance dose.
-IV therapy should continue for at least 7 days.
-Once the patient has clinically improved and can tolerate oral medication, oral voriconazole may be used.

Candidemia in nonneutropenic patients and other deep tissue Candida infections: 3 to 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

Comments:
-In clinical trials, candidemia was treated using 3 mg/kg IV every 12 hours as primary therapy, while other deep tissue Candida infections were treated using 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours as salvage therapy; appropriate dose should be based on the nature and severity of the infection.

Oral:
Less than 40 kg: 100 mg orally every 12 hours
40 kg or more: 200 mg orally every 12 hours

Duration of Therapy:
-Invasive aspergillosis: In a clinical trial, the median duration of IV therapy was 10 days (range 2 to 85 days) and of oral therapy was 76 days (range 2 to 232 days).
-IDSA guidelines for invasive aspergillosis: At least 6 to 12 weeks; in immunosuppressed patients, throughout immunosuppression and until lesions resolve
-Candidemia in nonneutropenic patients and other deep tissue Candida infections: At least 14 days after symptoms resolve or after last positive culture, whichever is longer

Uses: Invasive aspergillosis; candidemia in nonneutropenic patients; disseminated Candida infections in skin; Candida infections in abdomen, kidney, bladder wall, wounds; serious fungal infections due to Fusarium species and S apiospermum in patients intolerant of (or refractory to) other therapy

Usual Pediatric Dose for Pseudoallescheriosis:

2 to 11 years:
American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations: 9 mg/kg IV or orally every 12 hours
Maximum dose: 350 mg/dose

IDSA guidelines for invasive aspergillosis: 5 to 7 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

12 years or older:
Loading Dose: 6 mg/kg IV every 12 hours for 2 doses

Maintenance Dose:
IV:
Invasive aspergillosis and serious fungal infections due to Fusarium species and S apiospermum: 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

Comments:
-Therapy should start with the IV loading dose on Day 1 followed by the maintenance dose.
-IV therapy should continue for at least 7 days.
-Once the patient has clinically improved and can tolerate oral medication, oral voriconazole may be used.

Candidemia in nonneutropenic patients and other deep tissue Candida infections: 3 to 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

Comments:
-In clinical trials, candidemia was treated using 3 mg/kg IV every 12 hours as primary therapy, while other deep tissue Candida infections were treated using 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours as salvage therapy; appropriate dose should be based on the nature and severity of the infection.

Oral:
Less than 40 kg: 100 mg orally every 12 hours
40 kg or more: 200 mg orally every 12 hours

Duration of Therapy:
-Invasive aspergillosis: In a clinical trial, the median duration of IV therapy was 10 days (range 2 to 85 days) and of oral therapy was 76 days (range 2 to 232 days).
-IDSA guidelines for invasive aspergillosis: At least 6 to 12 weeks; in immunosuppressed patients, throughout immunosuppression and until lesions resolve
-Candidemia in nonneutropenic patients and other deep tissue Candida infections: At least 14 days after symptoms resolve or after last positive culture, whichever is longer

Uses: Invasive aspergillosis; candidemia in nonneutropenic patients; disseminated Candida infections in skin; Candida infections in abdomen, kidney, bladder wall, wounds; serious fungal infections due to Fusarium species and S apiospermum in patients intolerant of (or refractory to) other therapy

Usual Pediatric Dose for Systemic Fungal Infection:

2 to 11 years:
American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations: 9 mg/kg IV or orally every 12 hours
Maximum dose: 350 mg/dose

IDSA guidelines for invasive aspergillosis: 5 to 7 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

12 years or older:
Loading Dose: 6 mg/kg IV every 12 hours for 2 doses

Maintenance Dose:
IV:
Invasive aspergillosis and serious fungal infections due to Fusarium species and S apiospermum: 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

Comments:
-Therapy should start with the IV loading dose on Day 1 followed by the maintenance dose.
-IV therapy should continue for at least 7 days.
-Once the patient has clinically improved and can tolerate oral medication, oral voriconazole may be used.

Candidemia in nonneutropenic patients and other deep tissue Candida infections: 3 to 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

Comments:
-In clinical trials, candidemia was treated using 3 mg/kg IV every 12 hours as primary therapy, while other deep tissue Candida infections were treated using 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours as salvage therapy; appropriate dose should be based on the nature and severity of the infection.

Oral:
Less than 40 kg: 100 mg orally every 12 hours
40 kg or more: 200 mg orally every 12 hours

Duration of Therapy:
-Invasive aspergillosis: In a clinical trial, the median duration of IV therapy was 10 days (range 2 to 85 days) and of oral therapy was 76 days (range 2 to 232 days).
-IDSA guidelines for invasive aspergillosis: At least 6 to 12 weeks; in immunosuppressed patients, throughout immunosuppression and until lesions resolve
-Candidemia in nonneutropenic patients and other deep tissue Candida infections: At least 14 days after symptoms resolve or after last positive culture, whichever is longer

Uses: Invasive aspergillosis; candidemia in nonneutropenic patients; disseminated Candida infections in skin; Candida infections in abdomen, kidney, bladder wall, wounds; serious fungal infections due to Fusarium species and S apiospermum in patients intolerant of (or refractory to) other therapy

Usual Pediatric Dose for Cutaneous Fungal Infection:

2 to 11 years:
American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations: 9 mg/kg IV or orally every 12 hours
Maximum dose: 350 mg/dose

IDSA guidelines for invasive aspergillosis: 5 to 7 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

12 years or older:
Loading Dose: 6 mg/kg IV every 12 hours for 2 doses

Maintenance Dose:
IV:
Invasive aspergillosis and serious fungal infections due to Fusarium species and S apiospermum: 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

Comments:
-Therapy should start with the IV loading dose on Day 1 followed by the maintenance dose.
-IV therapy should continue for at least 7 days.
-Once the patient has clinically improved and can tolerate oral medication, oral voriconazole may be used.

Candidemia in nonneutropenic patients and other deep tissue Candida infections: 3 to 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

Comments:
-In clinical trials, candidemia was treated using 3 mg/kg IV every 12 hours as primary therapy, while other deep tissue Candida infections were treated using 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours as salvage therapy; appropriate dose should be based on the nature and severity of the infection.

Oral:
Less than 40 kg: 100 mg orally every 12 hours
40 kg or more: 200 mg orally every 12 hours

Duration of Therapy:
-Invasive aspergillosis: In a clinical trial, the median duration of IV therapy was 10 days (range 2 to 85 days) and of oral therapy was 76 days (range 2 to 232 days).
-IDSA guidelines for invasive aspergillosis: At least 6 to 12 weeks; in immunosuppressed patients, throughout immunosuppression and until lesions resolve
-Candidemia in nonneutropenic patients and other deep tissue Candida infections: At least 14 days after symptoms resolve or after last positive culture, whichever is longer

Uses: Invasive aspergillosis; candidemia in nonneutropenic patients; disseminated Candida infections in skin; Candida infections in abdomen, kidney, bladder wall, wounds; serious fungal infections due to Fusarium species and S apiospermum in patients intolerant of (or refractory to) other therapy

Usual Pediatric Dose for Fungal Infection -- Disseminated:

2 to 11 years:
American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations: 9 mg/kg IV or orally every 12 hours
Maximum dose: 350 mg/dose

IDSA guidelines for invasive aspergillosis: 5 to 7 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

12 years or older:
Loading Dose: 6 mg/kg IV every 12 hours for 2 doses

Maintenance Dose:
IV:
Invasive aspergillosis and serious fungal infections due to Fusarium species and S apiospermum: 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

Comments:
-Therapy should start with the IV loading dose on Day 1 followed by the maintenance dose.
-IV therapy should continue for at least 7 days.
-Once the patient has clinically improved and can tolerate oral medication, oral voriconazole may be used.

Candidemia in nonneutropenic patients and other deep tissue Candida infections: 3 to 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

Comments:
-In clinical trials, candidemia was treated using 3 mg/kg IV every 12 hours as primary therapy, while other deep tissue Candida infections were treated using 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours as salvage therapy; appropriate dose should be based on the nature and severity of the infection.

Oral:
Less than 40 kg: 100 mg orally every 12 hours
40 kg or more: 200 mg orally every 12 hours

Duration of Therapy:
-Invasive aspergillosis: In a clinical trial, the median duration of IV therapy was 10 days (range 2 to 85 days) and of oral therapy was 76 days (range 2 to 232 days).
-IDSA guidelines for invasive aspergillosis: At least 6 to 12 weeks; in immunosuppressed patients, throughout immunosuppression and until lesions resolve
-Candidemia in nonneutropenic patients and other deep tissue Candida infections: At least 14 days after symptoms resolve or after last positive culture, whichever is longer

Uses: Invasive aspergillosis; candidemia in nonneutropenic patients; disseminated Candida infections in skin; Candida infections in abdomen, kidney, bladder wall, wounds; serious fungal infections due to Fusarium species and S apiospermum in patients intolerant of (or refractory to) other therapy

Usual Pediatric Dose for Fungal Meningitis:

2 to 11 years:
American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations: 9 mg/kg IV or orally every 12 hours
Maximum dose: 350 mg/dose

IDSA guidelines for invasive aspergillosis: 5 to 7 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

12 years or older:
Loading Dose: 6 mg/kg IV every 12 hours for 2 doses

Maintenance Dose:
IV:
Invasive aspergillosis and serious fungal infections due to Fusarium species and S apiospermum: 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

Comments:
-Therapy should start with the IV loading dose on Day 1 followed by the maintenance dose.
-IV therapy should continue for at least 7 days.
-Once the patient has clinically improved and can tolerate oral medication, oral voriconazole may be used.

Candidemia in nonneutropenic patients and other deep tissue Candida infections: 3 to 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

Comments:
-In clinical trials, candidemia was treated using 3 mg/kg IV every 12 hours as primary therapy, while other deep tissue Candida infections were treated using 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours as salvage therapy; appropriate dose should be based on the nature and severity of the infection.

Oral:
Less than 40 kg: 100 mg orally every 12 hours
40 kg or more: 200 mg orally every 12 hours

Duration of Therapy:
-Invasive aspergillosis: In a clinical trial, the median duration of IV therapy was 10 days (range 2 to 85 days) and of oral therapy was 76 days (range 2 to 232 days).
-IDSA guidelines for invasive aspergillosis: At least 6 to 12 weeks; in immunosuppressed patients, throughout immunosuppression and until lesions resolve
-Candidemia in nonneutropenic patients and other deep tissue Candida infections: At least 14 days after symptoms resolve or after last positive culture, whichever is longer

Uses: Invasive aspergillosis; candidemia in nonneutropenic patients; disseminated Candida infections in skin; Candida infections in abdomen, kidney, bladder wall, wounds; serious fungal infections due to Fusarium species and S apiospermum in patients intolerant of (or refractory to) other therapy

Usual Pediatric Dose for Fusariosis:

2 to 11 years:
American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations: 9 mg/kg IV or orally every 12 hours
Maximum dose: 350 mg/dose

IDSA guidelines for invasive aspergillosis: 5 to 7 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

12 years or older:
Loading Dose: 6 mg/kg IV every 12 hours for 2 doses

Maintenance Dose:
IV:
Invasive aspergillosis and serious fungal infections due to Fusarium species and S apiospermum: 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

Comments:
-Therapy should start with the IV loading dose on Day 1 followed by the maintenance dose.
-IV therapy should continue for at least 7 days.
-Once the patient has clinically improved and can tolerate oral medication, oral voriconazole may be used.

Candidemia in nonneutropenic patients and other deep tissue Candida infections: 3 to 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

Comments:
-In clinical trials, candidemia was treated using 3 mg/kg IV every 12 hours as primary therapy, while other deep tissue Candida infections were treated using 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours as salvage therapy; appropriate dose should be based on the nature and severity of the infection.

Oral:
Less than 40 kg: 100 mg orally every 12 hours
40 kg or more: 200 mg orally every 12 hours

Duration of Therapy:
-Invasive aspergillosis: In a clinical trial, the median duration of IV therapy was 10 days (range 2 to 85 days) and of oral therapy was 76 days (range 2 to 232 days).
-IDSA guidelines for invasive aspergillosis: At least 6 to 12 weeks; in immunosuppressed patients, throughout immunosuppression and until lesions resolve
-Candidemia in nonneutropenic patients and other deep tissue Candida infections: At least 14 days after symptoms resolve or after last positive culture, whichever is longer

Uses: Invasive aspergillosis; candidemia in nonneutropenic patients; disseminated Candida infections in skin; Candida infections in abdomen, kidney, bladder wall, wounds; serious fungal infections due to Fusarium species and S apiospermum in patients intolerant of (or refractory to) other therapy

Usual Pediatric Dose for Esophageal Candidiasis:

12 years or older:
Less than 40 kg: 100 mg orally every 12 hours
40 kg or more: 200 mg orally every 12 hours

Duration of therapy: At least 14 days and at least 7 days after symptoms resolve

What other drugs will affect voriconazole?

Many drugs can interact with voriconazole. Below is just a partial list. Tell your doctor if you are using:

  • clopidogrel (Plavix);

  • cyclosporine (Sandimmune, Neoral);

  • phenytoin (Dilantin);

  • prednisolone (Orapred, Pediapred, Predalone, Veripred, and others);

  • tacrolimus (Prograf);

  • warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven);

  • birth control pills;

  • medication to treat HIV or AIDS, especially efavirenz (Atripla, Sustiva);

  • alfentanil (Alfenta) or fentanyl (Abstral, Actiq, Fentora, Duragesic, Lazanda, Onsolis);

  • omeprazole (Prilosec) and other stomach acid reducers;

  • cancer medicine such as vinblastine (Velban), vincristine (Oncovin), or vinorelbine (Navelbine);

  • methadone (Diskets, Methadose, Dolophine) or oxycodone (OxyContin, Combunox, Roxicodone, Percocet);

  • non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn, Naprelan, Treximet), celecoxib (Celebrex), diclofenac (Arthrotec, Cambia, Cataflam, Voltaren, Flector Patch, Pennsaid, Solareze), indomethacin (Indocin), meloxicam (Mobic), and others;

  • tranquilizers or sedatives such as alprazolam (Xanax), midazolam (Versed), triazolam (Halcion), and others;

  • cholesterol-lowering medicines such as atorvastatin (Lipitor, Caduet), lovastatin (Mevacor), pravastatin (Pravachol), or simvastatin (Zocor, Simcor, Vytorin);

  • heart or blood pressure medicine such as amlodipine (Norvasc, Caduet, Exforge, Lotrel, Tekamlo, Tribenzor, Twynsta, Amturnide), felodipine (Plendil), nicardipine (Cardene), nifedipine (Nifedical, Procardia), and others; or

  • an oral diabetes medicine such as glipizide (Glucotrol, Metaglip), glyburide (DiaBeta, Micronase, Glucovance), or tolbutamide (Orinase).

This list is not complete and there are many other drugs that can interact with voriconazole. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list of all your medicines and show it to any healthcare provider who treats you.

Where can I get more information?

  • Your pharmacist can provide more information about voriconazole.
  • Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.
  • Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Copyright 1996-2012 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 8.02. Revision Date: 2012-01-06, 5:55:08 PM.

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