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ivermectin

Pronunciation

Generic Name: ivermectin (oral) (EYE ver MEK tin)
Brand Name: Stromectol

What is ivermectin?

Ivermectin is an anti-parasite medication.

Ivermectin is used to treat infections in the body that are caused by certain parasites.

Ivermectin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about ivermectin?

Follow all directions on your medicine label and package. Tell each of your healthcare providers about all your medical conditions, allergies, and all medicines you use.

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What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking ivermectin?

You should not use ivermectin if you are allergic to it.

To make sure ivermectin is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have:

  • liver or kidney disease; or

  • cancer, HIV or AIDS, or other conditions that can weaken your immune system.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether ivermectin will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication.

Ivermectin can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Ivermectin should not be given to a child who weighs less than 33 pounds (15 kg).

How should I take ivermectin?

Follow all directions on your prescription label. Do not take this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Take ivermectin on an empty stomach, at least 1 hour before or 2 hours after a meal.

Ivermectin is usually given as a single dose. Take this medicine with a full glass of water.

To effectively treat your infection, you may need to take ivermectin again several months to a year after your first dose.

If you have a weak immune system (caused by disease or by using certain medicine), you may need to take more than one dose of ivermectin. Some people with weak immune systems need to take this medicine on a regular basis. Follow your doctor's instructions.

To make sure this medicine is working, you may need to provide frequent stool samples.

Store this medicine at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Since ivermectin is usually given in a single dose, you may not be on a dosing schedule. If you are on a schedule, take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

What should I avoid while taking ivermectin?

Drinking alcohol can increase certain side effects of ivermectin.

Ivermectin side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have:

  • eye pain or redness, puffy eyes, problems with your vision;

  • severe skin rash, itching, or rash with pus;

  • confusion, change in your mental status, balance problems, trouble walking;

  • fever, swollen glands, stomach pain, joint pain, swelling in your hands or feet;

  • fast heart rate, trouble breathing;

  • loss of bladder or bowel control;

  • neck or back pain, seizure (convulsions); or

  • a light-headed feeling, like you might pass out.

Common side effects may include:

  • headache, muscle aches;

  • dizziness;

  • nausea, diarrhea; or

  • mild skin rash.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Side effects (in more detail)

Ivermectin dosing information

Usual Adult Dose for Onchocerciasis:

0.15 mg/kg orally once every 12 months
Patients with heavy ocular infection may require retreatment every 6 months. Retreatment may be considered at intervals as short as 3 months.

Dosage guidelines based on body weight:
15 to 25 kg: 3 mg orally one time
26 to 44 kg: 6 mg orally one time
45 to 64 kg: 9 mg orally one time
65 to 84 kg: 12 mg orally one time
85 kg or more: 0.15 mg/kg orally one time

Usual Adult Dose for Strongyloidiasis:

0.2 mg/kg orally once
In immunocompromised (including HIV) patients, the treatment of strongyloidiasis may be refractory requiring repeated treatment (i.e., every 2 weeks) and suppressive therapy (i.e., once a month), although well-controlled studies are not available. Cure may not be achievable in these patients.

Dosage guidelines based on body weight:
15 to 24 kg: 3 mg orally one time
25 to 35 kg: 6 mg orally one time
36 to 50 kg: 9 mg orally one time
51 to 65 kg: 12 mg orally one time
66 to 79 kg: 15 mg orally one time
80 kg or more: 0.2 mg/kg orally one time

Usual Adult Dose for Ascariasis:

0.2 mg/kg orally once

Usual Adult Dose for Cutaneous Larva Migrans:

0.2 mg/kg orally once

Usual Adult Dose for Filariasis:

0.2 mg/kg orally once

Study (n=26,000)
Mass treatment in Papua, New Guinea:
Bancroftian filariasis: 0.4 mg/kg orally once yearly (with a single annual dose of diethylcarbamazine 6 mg/kg), for 4 to 6 years

Usual Adult Dose for Scabies:

0.2 mg/kg orally once, and repeated in 2 weeks
Ivermectin therapy may be combined with a topical scabicide.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Filariasis:

Study (n=26,000)
Mass treatment in Papua, New Guinea:
Bancroftian filariasis:
5 years or older: 0.4 mg/kg orally once yearly (with a single annual dose of diethylcarbamazine 6 mg/kg), for 4 to 6 years

What other drugs will affect ivermectin?

Other drugs may interact with ivermectin, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Tell each of your health care providers about all medicines you use now and any medicine you start or stop using.

Where can I get more information?

  • Your pharmacist can provide more information about ivermectin.
  • Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.
  • Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Copyright 1996-2012 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 3.01. Revision Date: 2014-01-14, 10:40:04 AM.

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