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itraconazole

Pronunciation

Generic Name: itraconazole (IT ra KON a zole)
Brand Name: Onmel, Sporanox, Sporanox PulsePak

What is itraconazole?

Itraconazole is an antifungal medication.

Itraconazole is used to treat infections caused by fungus, which can invade any part of the body including the lungs, mouth or throat, toenails, or fingernails.

Itraconazole may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about itraconazole?

You should not take this medication if you are allergic to itraconazole or similar medications such as fluconazole or ketoconazole, if you have ever had congestive heart failure, or if you are pregnant or may become pregnant during treatment.

Some medicines can cause unwanted or dangerous effects when used with itraconazole. Your doctor may need to change your treatment plan if you use any of the following drugs: cisapride, dihydroergotamine, dofetilide, ergonovine, ergotamine, felodipine, lovastatin, methylergonovine, methadone, midazolam, nisoldipine, pimozide, quinidine, simvastatin, or triazolam.

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Many drugs can interact with itraconazole. Not all possible interactions are listed here. Tell your doctor about all your medications and any you start or stop using during treatment with itraconazole.

Before taking itraconazole, tell your doctor if you have heart disease, a history of stroke, a heart rhythm disorder, kidney or liver disease, a breathing disorder, cystic fibrosis, or a history of Long QT syndrome.

Take this medicine for the full prescribed length of time. Your symptoms may improve before the infection is completely cleared. Skipping doses may also increase your risk of further infection that is resistant to antibiotics. Itraconazole will not treat a viral infection such as the common cold or flu.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking itraconazole?

You should not take this medication if you are allergic to itraconazole or similar medications such as fluconazole or ketoconazole, if you have ever had congestive heart failure, or if you are pregnant or may become pregnant during treatment.

Some medicines can cause unwanted or dangerous effects when used with itraconazole. Your doctor may need to change your treatment plan if you use any of the following drugs:

  • cisapride;

  • dofetilide;

  • lovastatin or simvastatin;

  • methadone;

  • midazolam or triazolam;

  • felodipine or nisoldipine;

  • pimozide;

  • quinidine; or

  • ergot medicines such as dihydroergotamine, ergonovine, ergotamine, or methylergonovine.

To make sure itraconazole is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have:

  • heart disease, a heart rhythm disorder, circulation problems, or a history of stroke;

  • chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or other breathing disorder;

  • kidney disease;

  • cirrhosis or other liver disease;

  • cystic fibrosis; or

  • a personal or family history of Long QT syndrome.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether itraconazole will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication.

Itraconazole passes into breast milk and can harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How should I take itraconazole?

Follow all directions on your prescription label. Do not take this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

The itraconazole capsule should be taken after a full meal.

Take itraconazole oral solution (liquid) on an empty stomach, at least 1 hour before or 2 hours after a meal. Swish the liquid in your mouth for several seconds before swallowing it.

Measure liquid medicine with a special dose-measuring spoon or cup, not a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

Itraconazole capsules should not be used in place of itraconazole oral solution (liquid) if that is what your doctor has prescribed. Make sure you have received the correct type of this medication at the pharmacy and ask the pharmacist if you have any questions.

Take this medicine for the full prescribed length of time. Your symptoms may improve before the infection is completely cleared. Skipping doses may also increase your risk of further infection that is resistant to antibiotics. Itraconazole will not treat a viral infection such as the common cold or flu.

While using itraconazole, you may need frequent blood tests at your doctor's office.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

What should I avoid while taking itraconazole?

Avoid taking antacids or stomach acid reducers (Tagamet, Pepcid, Axid, Zantac, and others) within 1 hour before or 2 hours after you take itraconazole. These medications can make it harder for your body to absorb itraconazole.

Itraconazole side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have:

  • fever;

  • feeling short of breath, even with mild exertion;

  • swelling, rapid weight gain;

  • ringing in your ears, problems with hearing;

  • numbness or tingly feeling, blurred vision, double vision, loss of bladder control;

  • pain or burning when you urinate;

  • nausea, pain in your upper stomach, itching, loss of appetite, weakness, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); or

  • severe pain in your upper stomach spreading to your back, nausea and vomiting, fast heart rate.

Other common side effects may include:

  • diarrhea, constipation, bloating, mild nausea;

  • unpleasant taste in your mouth;

  • mild itching or skin rash;

  • joint pain, muscle pain or weakness;

  • headache, dizziness; or

  • runny nose or other cold symptoms.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Side effects (in more detail)

Itraconazole dosing information

Usual Adult Dose for Blastomycosis:

Capsules: 200 mg orally once a day; if no obvious improvement or if evidence of progressive fungal disease, the dose should be increased in 100 mg increments to a maximum of 400 mg/day
Treatment should be continued for a minimum of 3 months and until clinical parameters and laboratory tests indicate the active fungal infection has subsided.

Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) recommendations:
Mild to moderate pulmonary or mild to moderate disseminated infection without CNS involvement: 200 mg orally 3 times a day for 3 days, then 200 mg orally once or twice a day for 6 to 12 months

Moderately severe to severe pulmonary or moderately severe to severe disseminated infection without CNS involvement (following an initial regimen of IV amphotericin B): 200 mg orally 3 times a day for 3 days, then 200 mg orally once or twice a day
Total treatment duration:
Pulmonary blastomycosis: 6 to 12 months
Disseminated extrapulmonary blastomycosis: At least 12 months
Immunocompromised patients: At least 12 months

CNS blastomycosis (following an initial regimen of IV amphotericin B): 200 mg orally 2 or 3 times a day for at least 12 months and until CSF abnormalities resolve

Prevention of recurrence (secondary prophylaxis) in immunosuppressed patients: 200 mg orally once a day

Usual Adult Dose for Histoplasmosis:

Capsules: 200 mg orally once a day; if no obvious improvement or if evidence of progressive fungal disease, the dose should be increased in 100 mg increments to a maximum of 400 mg/day
Treatment should be continued for a minimum of 3 months and until clinical parameters and laboratory tests indicate the active fungal infection has subsided.

Oral solution (preferred):
IDSA recommendations:
Mild to moderate acute pulmonary infection in patients with symptoms longer than 1 month: 200 mg orally 3 times a day for 3 days, then 200 mg orally once or twice a day for 6 to 12 weeks

Moderately severe to severe acute pulmonary infection (following an initial regimen of IV amphotericin B): 200 mg orally 3 times a day for 3 days, then 200 mg orally twice a day for a total treatment duration of 12 weeks

Chronic cavitary pulmonary histoplasmosis: 200 mg orally 3 times a day for 3 days, then 200 mg orally once or twice a day for at least 1 year (18 to 24 months is preferred by some clinicians due to risk of relapse)

Mild to moderate progressive disseminated histoplasmosis: 200 mg orally 3 times a day for 3 days, then 200 mg orally twice a day for at least 1 year

Moderately severe to severe progressive disseminated histoplasmosis (following an initial regimen of IV amphotericin B): 200 mg orally 3 times a day for 3 days, then 200 mg orally twice a day for a total treatment duration of at least 12 months

Histoplasmosis with symptomatic mediastinal granuloma or with complications (pericarditis, rheumatologic syndromes, symptomatic mediastinal lymphadenitis) that require treatment with corticosteroids: 200 mg orally 3 times a day for 3 days, then 200 mg orally once or twice a day for 6 to 12 weeks

Primary prophylaxis in immunosuppressed patients: 200 mg orally once a day

Prevention of recurrence (secondary prophylaxis): 200 mg orally once a day

CNS histoplasmosis (following an initial regimen of IV amphotericin B): 200 mg orally 2 or 3 times a day for at least 1 year and until CSF abnormalities resolve and histoplasmal antigen is undetectable

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Institutes of Health (NIH), and IDSA recommendations for HIV-infected patients:
Less severe disseminated histoplasmosis: 200 mg orally 3 times a day for 3 days, then 200 mg orally twice a day for at least 12 months

Moderately severe to severe disseminated histoplasmosis (following an initial regimen of IV amphotericin B): 200 mg orally 3 times a day for 3 days, then 200 mg orally twice a day for a total treatment duration of greater than 12 months

Confirmed meningitis (following an initial regimen of IV amphotericin B): 200 mg orally 2 or 3 times a day for a total treatment duration of at least 1 year and until CSF abnormalities

Primary prophylaxis: 200 mg orally once a day

Prevention of recurrence (secondary prophylaxis): 200 mg orally once a day

Usual Adult Dose for Aspergillosis -- Aspergilloma:

Capsules: 200 to 400 mg orally per day in one or two divided doses
Treatment should be continued for a minimum of 3 months and until clinical parameters and laboratory tests indicate the active fungal infection has subsided.

IDSA recommendations:
Invasive aspergillosis: 200 mg orally 3 times a day for 3 days, then 200 mg orally twice a day
Empirical and preemptive therapy: 200 mg orally twice a day
Primary prophylaxis in immunocompromised patients (alternative therapy): 200 mg orally twice a day

Usual Adult Dose for Aspergillosis -- Invasive:

Capsules: 200 to 400 mg orally per day in one or two divided doses
Treatment should be continued for a minimum of 3 months and until clinical parameters and laboratory tests indicate the active fungal infection has subsided.

IDSA recommendations:
Invasive aspergillosis: 200 mg orally 3 times a day for 3 days, then 200 mg orally twice a day
Empirical and preemptive therapy: 200 mg orally twice a day
Primary prophylaxis in immunocompromised patients (alternative therapy): 200 mg orally twice a day

Usual Adult Dose for Oral Thrush:

Oral solution:
Oropharyngeal candidiasis: 200 mg orally once a day for 1 to 2 weeks

Clinical signs and symptoms of oropharyngeal candidiasis generally resolve within several days. Only the oral solution has been demonstrated effective for oral and/or esophageal candidiasis.

Oropharyngeal candidiasis unresponsive/refractory to treatment with fluconazole tablets: 100 mg orally twice a day

Clinical response will be seen in 2 to 4 weeks in patients responding to therapy. Patients may be expected to relapse shortly after discontinuing therapy.

Usual Adult Dose for Esophageal Candidiasis:

Oral solution: 100 mg orally once a day for a minimum of 3 weeks
Treatment should continue for 2 weeks following resolution of symptoms. Doses up to 200 mg/day may be used.

Only the oral solution has been demonstrated effective for oral and/or esophageal candidiasis.

Usual Adult Dose for Onychomycosis -- Toenail:

Capsules (with or without fingernail involvement) or tablets: 200 mg orally once a day for 12 consecutive weeks

Usual Adult Dose for Onychomycosis -- Fingernail:

Fingernails only:
Capsules: 200 mg orally twice a day for 1 week; the dosing should be repeated after 3 weeks without itraconazole for a total of 2 treatment pulses

Usual Adult Dose for Coccidioidomycosis:

(Not approved by FDA)

IDSA recommendations: 200 mg orally 2 or 3 times a day

Duration:
Uncomplicated coccidioidal pneumonia: 3 to 6 months
Diffuse pneumonia and chronic progressive fibrocavitary pneumonia: At least 1 year

CDC, NIH, and IDSA recommendations for HIV-infected patients:
Mild infection (nonmeningeal): 200 mg orally 3 times a day for 3 days, then 200 mg orally twice a day
Meningeal infection (as an alternative to fluconazole): 200 mg orally 3 times a day for 3 days, then 200 mg orally twice a day
Primary prophylaxis: 200 mg orally twice a day
Prevention of recurrence (secondary prophylaxis): 200 mg orally twice a day

Usual Adult Dose for Sporotrichosis:

(Not approved by FDA)

Oral solution (preferred):
IDSA recommendations:
Cutaneous or lymphocutaneous infection: 200 mg orally once a day for 2 to 4 weeks after all lesions have resolved (usually a total of 3 to 6 months); 200 mg orally twice a day is recommended if a response is not obtained

Osteoarticular infection: 200 mg orally twice a day for at least 12 months; if used following an initial regimen of IV amphotericin B (alternative therapy), itraconazole should be continued for a total treatment duration of at least 12 months

Less severe pulmonary infection: 200 mg orally twice a day for at least 12 months

Meningeal infection, disseminated infection, or severe or life-threatening pulmonary infection (following an initial regimen of IV amphotericin B for each infection): 200 mg orally twice a day for a total treatment duration of at least 12 months

Prevention of recurrence of meningeal infection or disseminated infection (secondary prophylaxis) in patients with AIDS and other immunosuppressed patients: 200 mg orally once a day

Usual Adult Dose for Cryptococcosis:

(Not approved by FDA)

Oral solution (preferred):
IDSA recommendations:
Mild to moderate pulmonary infection (nonmeningeal) in immunocompetent patients: 200 orally twice a day for 6 to 12 months
Prevention of recurrence (secondary prophylaxis) in HIV-infected patients: 200 mg orally twice a day

Fluconazole is the preferred agent. Itraconazole is recommended as an alternative if fluconazole is unavailable or contraindicated.

Usual Adult Dose for Cryptococcal Meningitis -- Immunosuppressed Host:

(Not approved by FDA)

Oral solution (preferred):
CDC, NIH, and IDSA recommendations for HIV-infected patients:
Consolidation therapy (after at least 2 weeks of successful induction therapy): 200 mg orally twice a day for 8 weeks or as determined by target CD4+ counts
Maintenance therapy: 200 mg orally once a day

Fluconazole is the preferred agent. Itraconazole is recommended as an alternative if fluconazole is unavailable or contraindicated.

Usual Adult Dose for Vaginal Candidiasis:

(Not approved by FDA)

Capsules: 200 mg orally twice a day for 1 day

CDC, NIH, and IDSA recommendations for HIV-infected patients:
Oral solution: 200 mg orally once a day for 3 to 7 days

Usual Adult Dose for Microsporidiosis:

(Not approved by FDA)

CDC, NIH, and IDSA recommendations for HIV-infected patients:
Disseminated infection due to Trachipleistophora or Anncaliia: 400 mg orally once a day in conjunction with albendazole

This regimen is recommended as alternative therapy.

Usual Adult Dose for Tinea Versicolor:

(Not approved by FDA)

Study (n=36)
200 mg orally once a day for 7 days

Usual Adult Dose for Paracoccidioidomycosis:

(Not approved by FDA)

200 mg orally once a day for 6 months

Usual Pediatric Dose for Blastomycosis:

(Not approved by FDA)

IDSA recommendations for children:
Mild to moderate infection: 10 mg/kg orally per day (up to 400 mg/day) for 6 to 12 months

Moderately severe to severe infection (following an initial regimen of IV amphotericin B): 10 mg/kg orally per day (up to 400 mg/day) for a total treatment duration of 12 months

Usual Pediatric Dose for Histoplasmosis:

(Not approved by FDA)

Oral solution:
IDSA recommendations for children:
Acute pulmonary infection: 5 to 10 mg/kg/day orally in 2 divided doses (up to 400 mg/day)

Progressive disseminated histoplasmosis (following an initial regimen of IV amphotericin B): 5 to 10 mg/kg/day orally in 2 divided doses (up to 400 mg/day) for a total treatment duration of 3 months; longer therapy may be needed for patients with severe disease, immunosuppression, or primary immunodeficiency syndromes

Prevention of recurrence (secondary prophylaxis): 5 mg/kg orally per day (up to 200 mg/day)

CDC, NIH, and IDSA recommendations:
HIV-exposed and HIV-infected infants and children:
Mild disseminated histoplasmosis: 2 to 5 mg/kg (up to 200 mg/dose) orally 3 times a day for 3 days, then 2 to 5 mg/kg (up to 200 mg/dose) orally twice a day for 12 months

Consolidation therapy for moderately severe to severe disseminated histoplasmosis (following an initial regimen of IV amphotericin B): 2 to 5 mg/kg (up to 200 mg) orally 3 times a day for 3 days, then 2 to 5 mg/kg (up to 200 mg) twice a day for 12 months

Consolidation therapy for CNS infection (following an initial regimen of IV amphotericin B): 2 to 5 mg/kg (up to 200 mg) orally 3 times a day for 3 days, then 2 to 5 mg/kg (up to 200 mg) orally twice a day for at least 12 months and until CSF abnormalities resolve and histoplasmal antigen is undetectable

Prophylaxis to prevent recurrence: 5 mg/kg (up to 200 mg/dose) orally twice a day

HIV-infected adolescents:
Less severe disseminated histoplasmosis: 200 mg orally 3 times a day for 3 days, then 200 mg orally twice a day for at least 12 months

Moderately severe to severe disseminated histoplasmosis (following an initial regimen of IV amphotericin B): 200 mg orally 3 times a day for 3 days, then 200 mg orally twice a day for a total treatment duration of greater than 12 months

Confirmed meningitis (following an initial regimen of IV amphotericin B): 200 mg orally 2 or 3 times a day for a total treatment duration of at least 1 year and until CSF abnormalities

Primary prophylaxis: 200 mg orally once a day

Prevention of recurrence (secondary prophylaxis): 200 mg orally once a day

Usual Pediatric Dose for Oral Thrush:

(Not approved by FDA)

Oral solution:
IDSA recommendations for patients 5 years or older:
Oropharyngeal candidiasis: 2.5 mg/kg orally twice a day

CDC, NIH, and IDSA recommendations:
HIV-exposed and HIV-infected infants and children:
Oropharyngeal candidiasis: 2.5 mg/kg orally twice a day (up to 200 mg/day) for 7 to 14 days
Fluconazole-refractory oropharyngeal candidiasis: 2.5 mg/kg orally twice a day (up to 400 mg/day) for 7 to 14 days

HIV-infected adolescents:
Oropharyngeal candidiasis, including fluconazole-refractory infections: 200 mg orally once a day for 7 to 14 days

Usual Pediatric Dose for Esophageal Candidiasis:

(Not approved by FDA)

Oral solution:
IDSA recommendations for patients 5 years or older: 2.5 mg/kg orally twice a day

CDC, NIH, and IDSA recommendations:
HIV-exposed and HIV-infected infants and children: 5 mg/kg/day orally in one or two divided doses for 14 to 21 days
HIV-infected adolescents: 200 mg orally once a day for 14 to 21 days

Usual Pediatric Dose for Coccidioidomycosis:

(Not approved by FDA)

CDC, NIH, and IDSA recommendations:
HIV-exposed and HIV-infected infants and children:
Mild infection (nonmeningeal): 5 to 10 mg/kg orally twice a day for 3 days, then 2 to 5 mg/kg orally twice a day for 3 to 6 months
Diffuse pulmonary or disseminated infection (nonmeningeal) in stable patients: 5 to 10 mg/kg orally twice a day for 3 days, then 2 to 5 mg/kg orally twice a day (up to 400 mg/day) for at least 1 year
Prophylaxis to prevent recurrence: 2 to 5 mg/kg (up to 200 mg/dose) orally twice a day

HIV-infected adolescents:
Mild infection (nonmeningeal): 200 mg orally 3 times a day for 3 days, then 200 mg orally twice a day
Meningeal infection (as an alternative to fluconazole): 200 mg orally 3 times a day for 3 days, then 200 mg orally twice a day
Primary prophylaxis: 200 mg orally twice a day
Prevention of recurrence (secondary prophylaxis): 200 mg orally twice a day

Usual Pediatric Dose for Cryptococcosis:

(Not approved by FDA)

Oral solution:
CDC, NIH, and IDSA recommendations for HIV-exposed and HIV-infected infants and children:
Prophylaxis to prevent recurrence: 5 mg/kg (up to 200 mg/dose) orally once a day

Fluconazole is the preferred agent. Itraconazole is recommended as an alternative if fluconazole is unavailable or contraindicated.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Cryptococcal Meningitis -- Immunosuppressed Host:

(Not approved by FDA)

Oral solution (preferred):
CDC, NIH, and IDSA recommendations:
HIV-exposed and HIV-infected infants and children:
Consolidation therapy for CNS infection: 2.5 to 5 mg/kg (up to 200 mg/dose) orally 3 times a day for 3 days, then 5 to 10 mg/kg/day orally in one or two divided doses (up to 200 mg/dose) for at least 8 weeks

HIV-infected adolescents:
Consolidation therapy (after at least 2 weeks of successful induction therapy): 200 mg orally twice a day for 8 weeks or as determined by target CD4+ counts
Maintenance therapy: 200 mg orally once a day

Fluconazole is the preferred agent. Itraconazole is recommended as an alternative if fluconazole is unavailable or contraindicated.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Vaginal Candidiasis:

(Not approved by FDA)

CDC, NIH, and IDSA recommendations for HIV-infected adolescents:
Oral solution: 200 mg orally once a day for 3 to 7 days

Usual Pediatric Dose for Sporotrichosis:

(Not approved by FDA)

Oral solution (preferred):
IDSA recommendations for children:
Cutaneous or lymphocutaneous infection: 6 to 10 mg/kg orally per day (up to 400 mg/day)
Disseminated infection (following an initial regimen of IV amphotericin B): 6 to 10 mg/kg orally per day (up to 400 mg/day)

Usual Pediatric Dose for Tinea Capitis:

(Not approved by FDA)

Continuous regimen:
Trichophyton tonsurans and Trichophyton violaceum (endothrix) species: 5 mg/kg/day orally for 2 to 4 weeks
Microsporum canis (ectothrix) species: 5 mg/kg/day orally for 4 to 6 weeks

Pulse regimen:
Capsules:
T tonsurans, T violaceum (endothrix), and M canis (ectothrix) species: 5 mg/kg/day orally for 1 week followed by a 3-week period off of treatment

Patient is evaluated on week 4 from the start of therapy for clinical response. If evidence of tinea capitis remains, additional pulse therapies may be required up to a maximum of 3 pulses.

What other drugs will affect itraconazole?

Many drugs can interact with itraconazole. Not all possible interactions are listed here. Tell your doctor about all your medications and any you start or stop using during treatment with itraconazole, especially:

  • a blood thinner such as warfarin, Coumadin;

  • cancer medications;

  • cholesterol medications such as atorvastatin;

  • cyclosporine;

  • diabetes medication you take by mouth;

  • digoxin, digitalis;

  • disopyramide;

  • fentanyl;

  • isoniazid (for treating tuberculosis);

  • rifabutin, rifampin, or rifapentine;

  • sirolimus or tacrolimus;

  • an antibiotic such as clarithromycin, erythromycin, or telithromycin;

  • an antifungal medication such as clotrimazole, ketoconazole, or voriconazole;

  • an antidepressant such as nefazodone, paroxetine, or sertraline;

  • a barbiturate such as amobarbital, butabarbital, mephobarbital, secobarbital or phenobarbital;

  • heart or blood pressure medications such as amlodipine, diltiazem, nifedipine, verapamil, and others;

  • HIV/AIDS medicine such as atazanavir, delavirdine, efavirenz, etravirine, indinavir, nelfinavir, nevirapine, saquinavir, or ritonavir;

  • a sedative such as alprazolam or diazepam (Valium); or

  • seizure medication such as carbamazepine, felbamate, oxcarbazepine, phenytoin, or primidone.

This list is not complete and many other drugs can interact with itraconazole. This includes prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Give a list of all your medicines to any healthcare provider who treats you.

Where can I get more information?

  • Your pharmacist can provide more information about itraconazole.
  • Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.
  • Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Copyright 1996-2012 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 10.03. Revision Date: 2013-01-02, 12:21:07 PM.

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