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cefaclor

Pronunciation

Generic Name: cefaclor (CEF a klor)
Brand Name: Raniclor, Ceclor, Ceclor Pulvules, Ceclor CD

What is cefaclor?

Cefaclor is in a group of drugs called cephalosporin (SEF a low spor in) antibiotics. It works by fighting bacteria in your body.

Cefaclor is used to treat many different types of infections caused by bacteria.

Cefaclor may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about cefaclor?

Do not take this medication if you are allergic to cefaclor, or to similar antibiotics, such as Ceftin, Cefzil, Keflex, Omnicef, and others.

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs (especially penicillin). Also tell your doctor if you have kidney disease or a history of intestinal problems.

Slideshow: Flashback: FDA Drug Approvals 2013

Take this medication for the entire length of time prescribed by your doctor. Your symptoms may get better before the infection is completely treated. Cefaclor will not treat a viral infection such as the common cold or flu.

Antibiotic medicines can cause diarrhea, which may be a sign of a new infection. If you have diarrhea that is watery or has blood in it, call your doctor. Do not use any medicine to stop the diarrhea unless your doctor has told you to.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking cefaclor?

Do not take this medication if you are allergic to cefaclor or to other cephalosporin antibiotics, such as:

  • cefadroxil (Duricef);

  • cefazolin (Ancef);

  • cefdinir (Omnicef);

  • cefditoren (Spectracef);

  • cefpodoxime (Vantin);

  • cefprozil (Cefzil);

  • ceftibuten (Cedax);

  • cefuroxime (Ceftin);

  • cephalexin (Keflex); or

  • cephradine (Velosef); and others.

Before taking cefaclor, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs (especially penicillins), or if you have:

  • kidney disease (or if you are on dialysis); or

  • a history of intestinal problems, such as colitis.

If you have any of these conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely take cefaclor.

FDA pregnancy category B. This medication is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment.

Cefaclor may pass into breast milk and could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

The cefaclor suspension (liquid) contains sucrose. Talk to your doctor before using this form of cefaclor if you have diabetes.

How should I take cefaclor?

Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Take this medicine with a full glass of water.

Cefaclor works best if you take it with a meal or within 30 minutes of a meal.

The cefaclor chewable tablet must be chewed before you swallow it.

Do not crush, chew, or break an extended-release tablet. Swallow the pill whole. Breaking the pill may cause too much of the drug to be released at one time.

Shake the oral suspension (liquid) well just before you measure a dose. To be sure you get the correct dose, measure the liquid with a marked measuring spoon or medicine cup, not with a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

This medication can cause you to have false results with certain medical tests, including urine glucose (sugar) tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using cefaclor.

Take cefaclor for the entire length of time prescribed by your doctor. Your symptoms may get better before the infection is completely treated. Cefaclor will not treat a viral infection such as the common cold or flu.

Store the tablets and capsules at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

Store cefaclor oral liquid in the refrigerator. Do not allow it to freeze. Throw away any unused medication that is older than 14 days.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the medication as soon as you remember the missed dose. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and use the medicine at your next regularly scheduled time. Do not use extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

Overdose symptoms may include nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, and diarrhea.

What should I avoid while taking cefaclor?

Antibiotic medicines can cause diarrhea, which may be a sign of a new infection. If you have diarrhea that is watery or has blood in it, call your doctor. Do not use any medicine to stop the diarrhea unless your doctor has told you to.

Cefaclor side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

  • diarrhea that is watery or bloody;

  • easy bruising or bleeding, severe tingling, numbness, pain, muscle weakness;

  • unusual bleeding;

  • seizure (convulsions);

  • pale or yellowed skin, dark colored urine, fever, confusion or weakness;

  • jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);

  • fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms, swollen glands, rash or itching, joint pain, or general ill feeling;

  • fever, sore throat, and headache with a severe blistering, peeling, and red skin rash; or

  • increased thirst, loss of appetite, swelling, weight gain, feeling short of breath, urinating less than usual or not at all.

Less serious side effects may include:

  • nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, mild diarrhea;

  • stiff or tight muscles;

  • feeling restless or hyperactive;

  • unusual or unpleasant taste in your mouth;

  • mild itching or skin rash;

  • dizziness, drowsiness; or

  • vaginal itching or discharge.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Side effects (in more detail)

Cefaclor dosing information

Usual Adult Dose for Bronchitis:

Acute bacterial exacerbation of chronic bronchitis or secondary bacterial infection of acute bronchitis:
Immediate-release: 250 to 500 mg orally every 8 hours
Extended-release: 500 mg orally every 12 hours with food
Duration: 7 days

Usual Adult Dose for Otitis Media:

Immediate-release: 250 to 500 mg orally every 8 hours for 10 to 14 days

Usual Adult Dose for Pneumonia:

Mild to moderate:
Immediate-release: 500 mg orally every 8 hours for 10 to 21 days

Usual Adult Dose for Pyelonephritis:

Mild to moderate:
Immediate-release: 500 mg orally every 8 hours for 14 days

Usual Adult Dose for Sinusitis:

Immediate-release: 250 to 500 mg orally every 8 hours for 10 to 14 days
Extended-release: 375 mg orally every 12 hours with food
Duration: 10 to 14 days. Longer courses of therapy, sometimes 3 to 4 weeks, may be required for refractory or recurrent cases.

Usual Adult Dose for Skin or Soft Tissue Infection:

Uncomplicated:
Immediate-release: 250 to 500 mg orally every 8 hours
Extended-release: 375 mg orally every 12 hours with food
Duration: 7 to 10 days

Usual Adult Dose for Tonsillitis/Pharyngitis:

Immediate-release: 250 to 500 mg orally every 8 hours
Extended-release: 375 mg orally every 12 hours with food
Duration: 10 days

Usual Adult Dose for Upper Respiratory Tract Infection:

Mild to moderate:
Immediate-release: 250 to 500 mg orally every 8 hours for 10 days
Extended-release: 375 mg orally every 12 hours with food
Duration: 10 days

Usual Adult Dose for Urinary Tract Infection:

Immediate-release: 250 to 500 mg orally every 8 hours for 3 to 10 days

Usual Pediatric Dose for Otitis Media:

1 month or older:
Immediate-release: 20 to 40 mg/kg/day orally in divided doses every 8 or 12 hours; do not exceed 1 g/day
Duration: At least 10 days

Usual Pediatric Dose for Tonsillitis/Pharyngitis:

1 month or older:
Immediate-release: 20 to 40 mg/kg/day orally in divided doses every 8 or 12 hours; do not exceed 1 g/day
Duration: At least 10 days

Usual Pediatric Dose for Cystitis:

1 month or more:
Immediate-release: 20 to 40 mg/kg/day orally in divided doses every 8 or 12 hours; do not exceed 1 g/day

Usual Pediatric Dose for Pneumonia:

1 month or more:
Immediate-release: 20 to 40 mg/kg/day orally in divided doses every 8 or 12 hours; do not exceed 1 g/day

Usual Pediatric Dose for Pyelonephritis:

1 month or more:
Immediate-release: 20 to 40 mg/kg/day orally in divided doses every 8 or 12 hours; do not exceed 1 g/day

Usual Pediatric Dose for Urinary Tract Infection:

1 month or more:
Immediate-release: 20 to 40 mg/kg/day orally in divided doses every 8 or 12 hours; do not exceed 1 g/day

Usual Pediatric Dose for Skin and Structure Infection:

1 month or more:
Immediate-release: 20 to 40 mg/kg/day orally in divided doses every 8 or 12 hours; do not exceed 1 g/day

What other drugs will affect cefaclor?

Before taking cefaclor, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following medicines:

  • probenecid (Benemid); or

  • a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin);

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with cefaclor. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start taking a new medication without telling your doctor.

Where can I get more information?

  • Your pharmacist can provide more information about cefaclor.
  • Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.
  • Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Copyright 1996-2012 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 5.03. Revision Date: 2010-12-15, 5:01:39 PM.

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