beractant

Generic Name: beractant (ber AK tant)
Brand Name: Survanta Intratracheal

What is beractant?

Beractant is a lung surface acting agent, or "surfactant." It helps the lungs function normally. Beractant is similar to the natural fluid in the lungs that helps maintain effective breathing.

Beractant is used to treat or prevent respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in a premature baby whose lungs have not fully developed.

Beractant may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about beractant?

Your baby will receive this medication in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) or similar hospital setting.

Beractant is given directly into the baby's lungs through a breathing tube that is also connected to a ventilator (a machine that moves air in and out of the lungs to help your baby breathe easier and get enough oxygen).

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Your baby will remain under constant supervision during treatment with beractant.

Follow your doctor's instructions about any restrictions on feeding or other medications after your child has been treated with beractant.

What should I discuss with my health care provider before my child receives beractant?

To best participate in the care of your baby while he or she is in the NICU, carefully follow all instructions provided by your baby's caregivers.

How is beractant given?

Beractant is given directly into the baby's lungs through a breathing tube. Your baby will receive this medication in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) or similar hospital setting.

The breathing tube is connected to a ventilator (a machine that moves air in and out of the lungs to help your baby breathe easier and get enough oxygen).

Beractant is given as soon as possible after the baby's birth, usually within minutes or hours.

Your baby's breathing, blood pressure, oxygen levels, and other vital signs will be watched closely during treatment with beractant. This will help your doctor determine how long to continue treatment with beractant. Your child may also need blood tests.

What happens if my child misses a dose?

Since beractant is given as needed by a healthcare professional, it is not likely that your baby will miss a dose.

What happens if my child receives an overdose?

Since beractant is given in a controlled medical setting by a healthcare professional, an overdose is not likely to occur. However, an overdose of beractant is not expected to produce life-threatening symptoms.

What should be avoided after my child receives beractant?

Follow your doctor's instructions about any restrictions in feeding, medications, or activity after your baby has been treated with beractant.

Beractant side effects

There is a possibility that the baby will have breathing difficulties during the beractant treatment, and these problems may require further treatment by health care professionals. Your baby will remain under constant supervision during treatment with beractant.

Tell your child's caregivers at once if the child has any of these serious side effects:

  • pale skin;

  • slow heartbeat;

  • breathing that stops;

  • urinating less than usual; or

  • blood in the urine.

Less serious side effects include:

  • noisy breathing;

  • feeding or bowel problems; or

  • bleeding around the endotracheal tube.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Side effects (in more detail)

Beractant dosing information

Usual Pediatric Dose for Respiratory Distress Syndrome:

<48 hours of life: 4 mL/kg instilled intratracheally no more often than every 6 hours for a total of up to 4 doses. For prevention of respiratory distress syndrome in premature infants with birth weights of less than 1750 g and more than 600 g, the first dose is preferably given within 15 minutes of birth. For rescue treatment, the first dose is given as soon as possible, preferably within 8 hours of birth.
>48 hours of life: Safety and efficacy have not been established.

What other drugs will affect beractant?

Your baby's caregivers will manage and monitor all medications given to your baby during treatment in the NICU. A drug interaction between beractant and other medications is not expected to occur.

Do not give any medications to your baby that have not been prescribed by the baby's doctor. This includes vitamins, minerals, or herbal products.

Where can I get more information?

  • Your doctor or pharmacist can provide more information about beractant.
  • Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.
  • Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Copyright 1996-2012 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 1.06. Revision Date: 2012-09-20, 11:29:31 AM.

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