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The MS hug: Learn what causes it and how to get relief

baclofen

Pronunciation

Generic Name: baclofen (BAK loe fen)
Brand Name: Lioresal, Lioresal Intrathecal, Gablofen

What is baclofen?

Baclofen is a muscle relaxer and an antispastic agent.

Baclofen is used to treat muscle symptoms caused by multiple sclerosis, including spasm, pain, and stiffness.

Baclofen may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about baclofen?

This medication may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert.

Drinking alcohol can increase certain side effects of baclofen.

Do not use baclofen at a time when muscle tone is needed to assure safe balance and movement for certain activities. In some situations, it may endanger your physical safety to be in a state of reduced muscle tone.

You may have withdrawal symptoms such as seizures or hallucinations, when you stop using baclofen after using it over a long period of time.

Do not stop using baclofen without first talking to your doctor. You may need to use less and less before you stop the medication completely.

Using baclofen may increase your risk of developing an ovarian cyst. Talk with your doctor about your specific risk.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking baclofen?

You should not use baclofen if you are allergic to it.

To make sure you can safely take baclofen, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

  • kidney disease;

  • epilepsy or other seizure disorder; or

  • a history of stroke or blood clots.

Using baclofen may increase your risk of developing an ovarian cyst. Talk with your doctor about your specific risk.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether baclofen will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication.

It is not known whether baclofen passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while you are using baclofen.

Do not give this medication to a child younger than 12 years old.

Older adults may be more sensitive to the effects of this medicine.

How should I take baclofen?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results.

Call your doctor if your muscle symptoms do not improve after 2 weeks of taking this medication.

Do not stop taking this medication without first talking to your doctor. You may have withdrawal symptoms such as seizures or hallucinations, when you stop using baclofen after using it over a long period of time. You may need to use less and less before you stop the medication completely.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include muscle weakness, vomiting, drowsiness, dilated or pinpoint pupils, weak or shallow breathing, fainting, or coma.

What should I avoid while taking baclofen?

This medication may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert.

Drinking alcohol can increase certain side effects of baclofen.

Do not use baclofen at a time when muscle tone is needed to assure safe balance and movement for certain activities. In some situations, it may endanger your physical safety to be in a state of reduced muscle tone.

Baclofen side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

  • seizure (convulsions);

  • confusion, hallucinations; or

  • an uneven heartbeat.

Less serious side effects may include:

  • drowsiness, dizziness, weakness, tired feeling;

  • headache;

  • sleep problems (insomnia);

  • nausea, constipation; or

  • urinating more often than usual.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Side effects (in more detail)

Baclofen dosing information

Usual Adult Dose for Spasticity:

ORAL:
-Initial dose: The following gradually increasing dosage regimen is suggested, but should be adjusted to suit individual patient requirements: 5 mg orally 3 times a day for 3 days, then 10 mg orally 3 times a day for 3 days, then 15 mg orally 3 times a day for 3 days, then 20 mg orally 3 times a day for 3 days
-Maintenance dose: Should be individualized
-Maximum dose: 80 mg/day (20 mg 4 times a day)
Comment:
-The maximum dose of 80 mg/day should be administered in 4 divided doses.

Use: To alleviate symptoms of spasticity of voluntary muscle (e.g., multiple sclerosis, cerebrovascular accidents, cerebral palsy, meningitis, traumatic head injury, spastic spinal paralysis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, traumatic paraplegia or paraparesis, compression of the spinal cord, tumors of the spinal cord, syringomyelia, motor neuron disease, transverse myelitis, traumatic partial section of the cord)

Usual Adult Dose for Cerebral Spasticity:

INTRATHECAL:
SCREENING PHASE: Prior to administering this drug as a continuous intrathecal infusion, patients must show a positive response to administration of an intrathecal test dose in an initial test phase:
-FIRST TEST DOSE: 50 mcg (in a volume of 1 mL) injected into the intrathecal space by barbotage over at least 1 minute. Observe patient for 4 to 8 hours for a positive response.
-SECOND TEST DOSE (if no positive response to first test dose): 75 mcg (in a volume of 1.5 mL) may be administered 24 hours after the first test dose. Observe patient for 4 to 8 hours for a positive response.
-THIRD TEST DOSE (if no positive response to second test dose): 100 mcg (in a volume of 2 mL) may be administered 24 hours after the second test dose. Observe patient for 4 to 8 hours for a positive response. If no positive response to third test dose, the patient should not be considered for chronic intrathecal therapy.

POST-IMPLANT DOSE TITRATION PERIOD:
-The test dose that received a positive response should be doubled and given over 24 hours, unless the efficacy of the bolus dose was maintained for more than 8 hours, in which case the starting daily dose should be the screening dose delivered over 24 hours.
-No dose increases should be given in the first 24 hours.

-ADULT PATIENTS WITH SPASTICITY OF SPINAL CORD ORIGIN: After the first 24 hours, the daily dosage should be increased slowly by 10% to 30% increments and only once every 24 hours, until the desired effect is achieved.
-ADULT PATIENTS WITH SPASTICITY OF CEREBRAL ORIGIN: After the first 24 hours, the daily dose should be increased slowly by 5% to 15% only once every 24 hours, until the desired effect is achieved.

MAINTENANCE DOSING FOR SPASTICITY OF SPINAL CORD ORIGIN PATIENTS:
-During periodic refills of the pump, the daily dose may be increased by 10% to 40%, but no more than 40%, to maintain adequate symptom control.
-The daily dose may be reduced by 10% to 20% if patients experience side effects.
-Maintenance dosage for long term continuous infusion: 12 to 2003 mcg/day, with most patients adequately maintained on 300 to 800 mcg/day; there is limited experience with daily doses greater than 1000 mcg/day.

MAINTENANCE DOSING FOR SPASTICITY OF CEREBRAL ORIGIN PATIENTS:
-During periodic refills of the pump, the daily dose may be increased by 5% to 20%, but no more than 20%, to maintain adequate symptom control.
-The daily dose may be reduced by 10% to 20% if patients experience side effects.
-Maintenance dosage for long term continuous infusion: 22 to 1400 mcg/day, with most patients adequately maintained on 90 to 703 mcg/day; there is limited experience with daily doses greater than 1000 mcg/day.

POTENTIAL NEED FOR DOSE ADJUSTMENTS IN CHRONIC USE:
-During long term treatment, approximately 5% of patients become refractory to increasing doses. There is not sufficient experience to make recommendations for tolerance treatment; however, this tolerance has been treated on occasion, in hospital, by a "drug holiday" consisting of the gradual reduction of intrathecal dosing over a 2 to 4 week period and switching to alternative methods of spasticity management.
-After the "drug holiday," intrathecal dosing may be restarted at the initial continuous infusion dose.

Comments:
-Determination of the optimal dose requires individual titration. The lowest dose with an optimal response should be used.
-For patients with spasticity due to head injury, it is recommended not to proceed to long-term until the symptoms of spasticity are stable (i.e., at least one year after the injury).
-A positive response consists of a significant decrease in muscle tone and/or frequency and/or severity of spasms.
-Many patients require gradual increases in dose over time to maintain optimal response during chronic therapy.
-A sudden large requirement for dose escalation suggests a catheter complication (i.e., catheter kink or dislodgement).
-Careful dose titration is needed when spasticity is necessary to sustain upright posture and balance in locomotion or whenever spasticity is used to obtain optimal function. Allowing occasional spasms may help support circulatory function, possibly prevent the formation of deep vein thrombosis, and optimize activities of daily living.
-Except in overdose related emergencies, dosing should be reduced slowly if the drug is discontinued for any reason.
-An attempt should be made to discontinue concomitant oral antispasticity medication to avoid possible overdose or adverse drug interactions, either prior to screening or following implant and initiation of chronic infusion.
If there is not a substantive clinical response to increases in the daily dose, check for proper pump function and catheter patency. Patients must be monitored closely in a fully equipped and staffed environment during the screening phase and dose-titration period immediately following implant. Resuscitative equipment should be immediately available for use in case of life-threatening or intolerable side effects.

Use: For the management of severe spasticity. Patients should first respond to a screening dose prior to consideration for long term infusion via an implantable pump. For spasticity of spinal cord origin, chronic infusion via an implantable pump should be reserved for patients unresponsive to oral therapy, or those who experience intolerable CNS side effects at effective doses. Patients with spasticity due to traumatic brain injury should wait at least one year after the injury before consideration of long term intrathecal therapy.

Usual Adult Dose for Spinal Spasticity:

INTRATHECAL:
SCREENING PHASE: Prior to administering this drug as a continuous intrathecal infusion, patients must show a positive response to administration of an intrathecal test dose in an initial test phase:
-FIRST TEST DOSE: 50 mcg (in a volume of 1 mL) injected into the intrathecal space by barbotage over at least 1 minute. Observe patient for 4 to 8 hours for a positive response.
-SECOND TEST DOSE (if no positive response to first test dose): 75 mcg (in a volume of 1.5 mL) may be administered 24 hours after the first test dose. Observe patient for 4 to 8 hours for a positive response.
-THIRD TEST DOSE (if no positive response to second test dose): 100 mcg (in a volume of 2 mL) may be administered 24 hours after the second test dose. Observe patient for 4 to 8 hours for a positive response. If no positive response to third test dose, the patient should not be considered for chronic intrathecal therapy.

POST-IMPLANT DOSE TITRATION PERIOD:
-The test dose that received a positive response should be doubled and given over 24 hours, unless the efficacy of the bolus dose was maintained for more than 8 hours, in which case the starting daily dose should be the screening dose delivered over 24 hours.
-No dose increases should be given in the first 24 hours.

-ADULT PATIENTS WITH SPASTICITY OF SPINAL CORD ORIGIN: After the first 24 hours, the daily dosage should be increased slowly by 10% to 30% increments and only once every 24 hours, until the desired effect is achieved.
-ADULT PATIENTS WITH SPASTICITY OF CEREBRAL ORIGIN: After the first 24 hours, the daily dose should be increased slowly by 5% to 15% only once every 24 hours, until the desired effect is achieved.

MAINTENANCE DOSING FOR SPASTICITY OF SPINAL CORD ORIGIN PATIENTS:
-During periodic refills of the pump, the daily dose may be increased by 10% to 40%, but no more than 40%, to maintain adequate symptom control.
-The daily dose may be reduced by 10% to 20% if patients experience side effects.
-Maintenance dosage for long term continuous infusion: 12 to 2003 mcg/day, with most patients adequately maintained on 300 to 800 mcg/day; there is limited experience with daily doses greater than 1000 mcg/day.

MAINTENANCE DOSING FOR SPASTICITY OF CEREBRAL ORIGIN PATIENTS:
-During periodic refills of the pump, the daily dose may be increased by 5% to 20%, but no more than 20%, to maintain adequate symptom control.
-The daily dose may be reduced by 10% to 20% if patients experience side effects.
-Maintenance dosage for long term continuous infusion: 22 to 1400 mcg/day, with most patients adequately maintained on 90 to 703 mcg/day; there is limited experience with daily doses greater than 1000 mcg/day.

POTENTIAL NEED FOR DOSE ADJUSTMENTS IN CHRONIC USE:
-During long term treatment, approximately 5% of patients become refractory to increasing doses. There is not sufficient experience to make recommendations for tolerance treatment; however, this tolerance has been treated on occasion, in hospital, by a "drug holiday" consisting of the gradual reduction of intrathecal dosing over a 2 to 4 week period and switching to alternative methods of spasticity management.
-After the "drug holiday," intrathecal dosing may be restarted at the initial continuous infusion dose.

Comments:
-Determination of the optimal dose requires individual titration. The lowest dose with an optimal response should be used.
-For patients with spasticity due to head injury, it is recommended not to proceed to long-term until the symptoms of spasticity are stable (i.e., at least one year after the injury).
-A positive response consists of a significant decrease in muscle tone and/or frequency and/or severity of spasms.
-Many patients require gradual increases in dose over time to maintain optimal response during chronic therapy.
-A sudden large requirement for dose escalation suggests a catheter complication (i.e., catheter kink or dislodgement).
-Careful dose titration is needed when spasticity is necessary to sustain upright posture and balance in locomotion or whenever spasticity is used to obtain optimal function. Allowing occasional spasms may help support circulatory function, possibly prevent the formation of deep vein thrombosis, and optimize activities of daily living.
-Except in overdose related emergencies, dosing should be reduced slowly if the drug is discontinued for any reason.
-An attempt should be made to discontinue concomitant oral antispasticity medication to avoid possible overdose or adverse drug interactions, either prior to screening or following implant and initiation of chronic infusion.
If there is not a substantive clinical response to increases in the daily dose, check for proper pump function and catheter patency. Patients must be monitored closely in a fully equipped and staffed environment during the screening phase and dose-titration period immediately following implant. Resuscitative equipment should be immediately available for use in case of life-threatening or intolerable side effects.

Use: For the management of severe spasticity. Patients should first respond to a screening dose prior to consideration for long term infusion via an implantable pump. For spasticity of spinal cord origin, chronic infusion via an implantable pump should be reserved for patients unresponsive to oral therapy, or those who experience intolerable CNS side effects at effective doses. Patients with spasticity due to traumatic brain injury should wait at least one year after the injury before consideration of long term intrathecal therapy.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Spasticity:

12 years and older:
ORAL:
-Initial dose: The following gradually increasing dosage regimen is suggested, but should be adjusted to suit individual patient requirements: 5 mg orally 3 times a day for 3 days, then 10 mg orally 3 times a day for 3 days, then 15 mg orally 3 times a day for 3 days, then 20 mg orally 3 times a day for 3 days
-Maintenance dose: Should be individualized
-Maximum dose: 80 mg/day (20 mg 4 times a day)

Use: To alleviate symptoms of spasticity of voluntary muscle (e.g., multiple sclerosis, cerebrovascular accidents, cerebral palsy, meningitis, traumatic head injury, spastic spinal paralysis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, traumatic paraplegia or paraparesis, compression of the spinal cord, tumors of the spinal cord, syringomyelia, motor neuron disease, transverse myelitis, traumatic partial section of the cord)

Usual Pediatric Dose for Cerebral Spasticity:

PEDIATRIC PATIENTS:
-The starting screening dose for pediatric patients is the same as in adult patients, (50 mcg); however, for very small patients, a screening dose of 25 mcg may be tried first:
INTRATHECAL:
SCREENING PHASE: Prior to administering this drug as a continuous intrathecal infusion, patients must show a positive response to administration of an intrathecal test dose in an initial test phase:
-FIRST TEST DOSE: 25 to 50 mcg (in a volume of 1 mL) injected into the intrathecal space by barbotage over at least 1 minute. Observe patient for 4 to 8 hours for a positive response.
-SECOND TEST DOSE (if no positive response to first test dose): 75 mcg (in a volume of 1.5 mL) may be administered 24 hours after the first test dose. Observe patient for 4 to 8 hours for a positive response.
-THIRD TEST DOSE (if no positive response to second test dose): 100 mcg (in a volume of 2 mL) may be administered 24 hours after the second test dose. Observe patient for 4 to 8 hours for a positive response. If no positive response to third test dose, the patient should not be considered for chronic intrathecal therapy.

POST-IMPLANT DOSE TITRATION PERIOD:
-The test dose that received a positive response should be doubled and given over 24 hours, unless the efficacy of the bolus dose was maintained for more than 8 hours, in which case the starting daily dose should be the screening dose delivered over 24 hours.
-No dose increases should be given in the first 24 hours for programmable pumps and in the first 48 hours for nonprogrammable pumps.

AFTER THE FIRST 24 HOURS: The daily dosage should be increased slowly by 5% to 15% increments and only once every 24 hours, until the desired effect is achieved.

MAINTENANCE DOSING:
The same dosing recommendations for adults with spasticity of cerebral origin are used in pediatric patients:
-During periodic refills of the pump, the daily dose may be increased by 5% to 20%, but no more than 20%, to maintain adequate symptom control.
-The daily dose may be reduced by 10% to 20% if patients experience side effects.

MAINTENANCE DOSAGE FOR LONG TERM CONTINUOUS INFUSION:
-Age 12 YEARS AND OLDER: 22 to 1400 mcg/day, with most patients adequately maintained on 90 to 703 mcg/day; there is limited experience with daily doses greater than 1000 mcg/day.
-LESS THAN 12 YEARS OF AGE:
-Pediatric patients under 12 years seem to require a lower daily dose in clinical trials: 274 mcg/day, with a range of 24 to 1199 mcg/day

POTENTIAL NEED FOR DOSE ADJUSTMENTS IN CHRONIC USE:
-During long term treatment, approximately 5% of patients become refractory to increasing doses. There is not sufficient experience to make recommendations for tolerance treatment; however, this tolerance has been treated on occasion, in hospital, by a "drug holiday" consisting of the gradual reduction of intrathecal dosing over a 2 to 4 week period and switching to alternative methods of spasticity management.
-After the "drug holiday," intrathecal dosing may be restarted at the initial continuous infusion dose.

Comments:
-Determination of the optimal dose requires individual titration. The lowest dose with an optimal response should be used.
-For patients with spasticity due to head injury, it is recommended not to proceed to long-term until the symptoms of spasticity are stable (i.e., at least one year after the injury).
-A positive response consists of a significant decrease in muscle tone and/or frequency and/or severity of spasms.
-Many patients require gradual increases in dose over time to maintain optimal response during chronic therapy.
-A sudden large requirement for dose escalation suggests a catheter complication (i.e., catheter kink or dislodgement).
-Careful dose titration is needed when spasticity is necessary to sustain upright posture and balance in locomotion or whenever spasticity is used to obtain optimal function. Allowing occasional spasms may help support circulatory function, possibly prevent the formation of deep vein thrombosis, and optimize activities of daily living.
-Except in overdose related emergencies, dosing should be reduced slowly if the drug is discontinued for any reason.
-An attempt should be made to discontinue concomitant oral antispasticity medication to avoid possible overdose or adverse drug interactions, either prior to screening or following implant and initiation of chronic infusion.
If there is not a substantive clinical response to increases in the daily dose, check for proper pump function and catheter patency. Patients must be monitored closely in a fully equipped and staffed environment during the screening phase and dose-titration period immediately following implant. Resuscitative equipment should be immediately available for use in case of life-threatening or intolerable side effects.

Use: For the management of severe spasticity. Patients should first respond to a screening dose prior to consideration for long term infusion via an implantable pump. For spasticity of spinal cord origin, chronic infusion via an implantable pump should be reserved for patients unresponsive to oral therapy, or those who experience intolerable CNS side effects at effective doses. Patients with spasticity due to traumatic brain injury should wait at least one year after the injury before consideration of long term intrathecal therapy.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Spinal Spasticity:

PEDIATRIC PATIENTS:
-The starting screening dose for pediatric patients is the same as in adult patients, (50 mcg); however, for very small patients, a screening dose of 25 mcg may be tried first:
INTRATHECAL:
SCREENING PHASE: Prior to administering this drug as a continuous intrathecal infusion, patients must show a positive response to administration of an intrathecal test dose in an initial test phase:
-FIRST TEST DOSE: 25 to 50 mcg (in a volume of 1 mL) injected into the intrathecal space by barbotage over at least 1 minute. Observe patient for 4 to 8 hours for a positive response.
-SECOND TEST DOSE (if no positive response to first test dose): 75 mcg (in a volume of 1.5 mL) may be administered 24 hours after the first test dose. Observe patient for 4 to 8 hours for a positive response.
-THIRD TEST DOSE (if no positive response to second test dose): 100 mcg (in a volume of 2 mL) may be administered 24 hours after the second test dose. Observe patient for 4 to 8 hours for a positive response. If no positive response to third test dose, the patient should not be considered for chronic intrathecal therapy.

POST-IMPLANT DOSE TITRATION PERIOD:
-The test dose that received a positive response should be doubled and given over 24 hours, unless the efficacy of the bolus dose was maintained for more than 8 hours, in which case the starting daily dose should be the screening dose delivered over 24 hours.
-No dose increases should be given in the first 24 hours for programmable pumps and in the first 48 hours for nonprogrammable pumps.

AFTER THE FIRST 24 HOURS: The daily dosage should be increased slowly by 5% to 15% increments and only once every 24 hours, until the desired effect is achieved.

MAINTENANCE DOSING:
The same dosing recommendations for adults with spasticity of cerebral origin are used in pediatric patients:
-During periodic refills of the pump, the daily dose may be increased by 5% to 20%, but no more than 20%, to maintain adequate symptom control.
-The daily dose may be reduced by 10% to 20% if patients experience side effects.

MAINTENANCE DOSAGE FOR LONG TERM CONTINUOUS INFUSION:
-Age 12 YEARS AND OLDER: 22 to 1400 mcg/day, with most patients adequately maintained on 90 to 703 mcg/day; there is limited experience with daily doses greater than 1000 mcg/day.
-LESS THAN 12 YEARS OF AGE:
-Pediatric patients under 12 years seem to require a lower daily dose in clinical trials: 274 mcg/day, with a range of 24 to 1199 mcg/day

POTENTIAL NEED FOR DOSE ADJUSTMENTS IN CHRONIC USE:
-During long term treatment, approximately 5% of patients become refractory to increasing doses. There is not sufficient experience to make recommendations for tolerance treatment; however, this tolerance has been treated on occasion, in hospital, by a "drug holiday" consisting of the gradual reduction of intrathecal dosing over a 2 to 4 week period and switching to alternative methods of spasticity management.
-After the "drug holiday," intrathecal dosing may be restarted at the initial continuous infusion dose.

Comments:
-Determination of the optimal dose requires individual titration. The lowest dose with an optimal response should be used.
-For patients with spasticity due to head injury, it is recommended not to proceed to long-term until the symptoms of spasticity are stable (i.e., at least one year after the injury).
-A positive response consists of a significant decrease in muscle tone and/or frequency and/or severity of spasms.
-Many patients require gradual increases in dose over time to maintain optimal response during chronic therapy.
-A sudden large requirement for dose escalation suggests a catheter complication (i.e., catheter kink or dislodgement).
-Careful dose titration is needed when spasticity is necessary to sustain upright posture and balance in locomotion or whenever spasticity is used to obtain optimal function. Allowing occasional spasms may help support circulatory function, possibly prevent the formation of deep vein thrombosis, and optimize activities of daily living.
-Except in overdose related emergencies, dosing should be reduced slowly if the drug is discontinued for any reason.
-An attempt should be made to discontinue concomitant oral antispasticity medication to avoid possible overdose or adverse drug interactions, either prior to screening or following implant and initiation of chronic infusion.
If there is not a substantive clinical response to increases in the daily dose, check for proper pump function and catheter patency. Patients must be monitored closely in a fully equipped and staffed environment during the screening phase and dose-titration period immediately following implant. Resuscitative equipment should be immediately available for use in case of life-threatening or intolerable side effects.

Use: For the management of severe spasticity. Patients should first respond to a screening dose prior to consideration for long term infusion via an implantable pump. For spasticity of spinal cord origin, chronic infusion via an implantable pump should be reserved for patients unresponsive to oral therapy, or those who experience intolerable CNS side effects at effective doses. Patients with spasticity due to traumatic brain injury should wait at least one year after the injury before consideration of long term intrathecal therapy.

What other drugs will affect baclofen?

Before using baclofen, tell your doctor if you regularly use other medicines that make you sleepy (such as cold or allergy medicine, sedatives, narcotic pain medicine, sleeping pills, other muscle relaxers, and medicine for seizures, depression, or anxiety). They can add to sleepiness caused by baclofen.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with baclofen. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

Where can I get more information?

  • Your pharmacist can provide more information about baclofen.
  • Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.
  • Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Copyright 1996-2012 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 5.01. Revision Date: 2011-09-12, 4:24:27 PM.

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