Amprenavir (Systemic)


VA CLASSIFICATION
Primary: AM830

Commonly used brand name(s): Agenerase.

Another commonly used name is
APV{06}
Note: For a listing of dosage forms and brand names by country availability, see Dosage Forms section(s).



Category:


Antiviral (systemic)—

Indications

General considerations
Amprenavir is a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-protease inhibitor. The use of amprenavir for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in combination with other antiretrovirals is based on analyses of plasma HIV-RNA levels and CD4 cell counts in controlled studies of up to 24-weeks duration. {01} Results from controlled trials evaluating the long-term suppression of HIV-RNA or disease progression with amprenavir have not yet been obtained. {01}{02}{03}

Cross-resistance among protease inhibitors has been observed; however, the potential for protease inhibitor cross-resistance in HIV-1 isolates from patients treated with amprenavir has not yet been determined. {01}

HIV-1 isolates from patients treated with amprenavir showed mutations of the HIV-1 protease gene, resulting in amino acid substitutes primarily at position M46I/L, I47V, I50V, I54L/V, and I84V, along with mutations in the viral protease p1/p6 cleavage site. HIV-1 isolates from patients on amprenavir monotherapy for 8 to 12 weeks showed a fivefold to tenfold decrease in susceptibility to amprenavir in vitro compared to baseline. HIV-1 isolates from 6 out of 28 patients using amprenavir, lamivudine, and zidovudine for 16 to 36 weeks showed a fivefold to elevenfold decrease in susceptibility to amprenavir in vitro compared to wild-type virus. {01}

Accepted

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection (treatment)—Amprenavir is indicated in combination with other antiretroviral agents in the treatment of HIV-1 infection. {01}


Pharmacology/Pharmacokinetics

Physicochemical characteristics:

Chemical group—
    Sulfonamide. {01}
Molecular weight—
    505.64 {01}

Solubility
    Approximately 0.04 mg per mL (mg/mL) in water at 25 °C. {01}

Mechanism of action/Effect:

Amprenavir inhibits HIV-1 protease by binding to the enzyme's active site. This prevents the processing of viral gag and gag-pol polyprotein precursors and results in the formation of immature noninfectious viral particles. {01}

Absorption:

Amprenavir is rapidly absorbed following oral administration and may be taken with or without food; however, amprenavir should not be taken with a high-fat meal as absorption will be reduced. Bioavailability of the oral solution is 14% less than the bioavailability of the capsules. After a single 1200-mg dose, the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) was 22.06 and 28.05 microgram hours per mL in the fed and fasted states, respectively. Absolute bioavailability has not been established. {01}

Distribution:

Apparent Vol D—430 L. {01}

It is not known if amprenavir is distributed into human breast milk; however, it is distributed into the milk of lactating rats. {01}

Protein binding:

Very high (90%). Amprenavir has the highest affinity for alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein. Higher amounts of unbound amprenavir are present as amprenavir serum concentrations increase. {01}

Biotransformation:

Hepatic metabolism by the cytochrome P450 3A4 isoenzyme. Metabolism via oxidation of the tetrahydrofuran and aniline moieties produces 2 major metabolites. Glucuronidation of oxidized metabolites results in minor metabolites, which are excreted in the urine and feces. {01}

Half-life:

7.1 to 10.6 hours. {01}

Time to peak concentration:

1 to 2 hours. In 5 adult HIV-infected patients receiving 1200 mg of amprenavir twice daily, mean time to maximum serum concentration was 1.9 hours. In pediatric patients, the time to peak concentration was 1.1 and 1.4 hours following dosing with 20 mg per kg of body weight (mg/kg) twice a day and 15 mg/kg three times a day, respectively. {01}

Peak serum concentration:

In adult patients—

• Following dosing of 1200 mg twice a day in 5 adult HIV-infected patients: 5.36 micrograms per mL (mcg/mL). {01}


In pediatric patients—

• Following dosing of 20 mg/kg twice a day: 6.8 mcg/mL. {01}


• Following dosing of 15 mg/kg three times a day: 4 mcg/mL. {01}


Elimination:


Fecal—
        Approximately 75% (as metabolites) of a single dose. {01}



Renal—
        Approximately 14% (as metabolites) of a single dose; less than 3% excreted unchanged in urine. {01}



Precautions to Consider

Cross-sensitivity and/or related problems

Because amprenavir is a sulfonamide, patients allergic to sulfonamides should be treated with caution. {01}

Carcinogenicity

Studies have not been completed. {01}

Mutagenicity

Amprenavir was not mutagenic or genotoxic in a series of in vitro and in vivo assays, including bacterial reverse mutation (Ames test), mouse lymphoma, rat micronucleus, and chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes. {01}

Pregnancy/Reproduction
Fertility—
Amprenavir did not affect the mating or fertility of male or female rats; the development and maturation of sperm were not impaired. No untoward effects on reproduction were found in rats born to female rats who were treated with amprenavir. {01}

Pregnancy—
Adequate and well-controlled studies in humans have not been done.{02} Amprenavir oral solution is contraindicated in pregnant women because of the potential risk of toxicity to the fetus from the large amount of propylene glycol contained in the formulation.{03}

Abortions were associated with amprenavir administration in rabbits. Increased skeletal abnormalities were found in the offspring of rabbits and rats; in rabbits the systemic exposure at the highest tested dose was approximately one twentieth of the exposure seen at the recommended human dose; in rats, the systemic exposure was one half of that associated with the recommended human dose. Reduced body weights (10% to 20%) occurred in the offspring of rats dosed in the prenatal and postnatal periods; systemic exposure was approximately twice the exposure in humans at the recommended human dose.

An Antiretroviral Pregnancy Registry has been established to monitor the maternal and fetal outcomes of pregnant women exposed to amprenavir. Physicians are encouraged by the manufacturer to register patients by calling (800) 258-4263. {01}

FDA Pregnancy Category C. {01}

Breast-feeding

It is not known whether amprenavir is distributed into breast milk. However, the U.S. Public Health Service Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advises HIV-infected women not to breast-feed, to avoid postnatal transmission of HIV to an uninfected child.{02}{03}

Amprenavir is distributed into milk in rats. {01}

Pediatrics

Amprenavir has been studied in 118 pediatric patients ranging from 4 to 12 years of age. The adverse-effect profile observed in pediatric patients was similar to that observed in adult patients. {01}

The safety and efficacy of amprenavir capsules have not been established in patients up to 4 years of age.{01}{02} Amprenavir oral solution is contraindicated in patients up to 4 years of age because of the potential risk of toxicity from the large amount of propylene glycol contained in the formulation.{03}


Geriatrics


No information is available on the relationship of age to the effects of amprenavir in geriatric patients. However, elderly patients are more likely to have age-related hepatic function impairment, which may require a reduction in dose in patients receiving amprenavir. {01}


Pharmacogenetics
The pharmacokinetics of amprenavir do not differ between females and males or between Blacks and non-Blacks.{03} However, amprenavir oral solution contains a large amount of propylene glycol and because Asians, Eskimos, Native Americans, and women have a decreased ability to metabolize this compound, they may have an increased risk of developing propylene glycol–associated side effects.{03}

Drug interactions and/or related problems
The following drug interactions and/or related problems have been selected on the basis of their potential clinical significance (possible mechanism in parentheses where appropriate)—not necessarily inclusive (» = major clinical significance):


Note: Combinations containing any of the following medications, depending on the amount present, may also interact with this medication.

» Alcohol{03} or
» Disulfiram{03} or
» Metronidazole{03}    (because amprenavir oral solution contains a large amount of propylene glycol, concurrent use is not recommended{03})


Alprazolam or
Clorazepate or
Diazepam or
Flurazepam    (although these medications have not been specifically studied with amprenavir, amprenavir may increase the serum concentrations of these medications {01})


» Amiodarone or
» Lidocaine (systemic) or
» Tricyclic antidepressants or
» Quinidine    (although these medications have not been specifically studied with amprenavir, amprenavir may interfere in the metabolism of these medications and cause serious or life-threatening adverse events; monitoring of serum concentrations for these medications is recommended if amprenavir is used concurrently {01})


» Antacids or
» Didanosine    (although antacids have not been specifically studied with amprenavir, based on data from other protease inhibitors, antacids [and didanosine due to the antacid content present in didanosine formulations] may interfere with the absorption of amprenavir; it is recommended that antacid and didanosine administration be separated from amprenavir administration by at least one hour {01})


» Astemizole or
» Bepridil or
» Cisapride or
» Dihydroergotamine or
» Ergotamine or
» Midazolam or
» Triazolam    (although these medications have not been specifically studied with amprenavir, amprenavir may interfere in the metabolism of these medications and cause serious or life-threatening adverse events; concurrent use is not recommended {01} {02}{03})


Calcium channel blocking agents, such as:
Diltiazem
Nicardipine
Nifedipine
Nimodipine    (although calcium channel blocking agents have not been specifically studied with amprenavir, amprenavir may increase the serum concentrations of calcium channel blocking agents {01})


» Carbamazepine    (although carbamazepine has not been specifically studied with amprenavir, it may decrease the serum concentration of amprenavir; amprenavir also may increase the serum concentration of carbamazepine {01})


Cimetidine or
Ritonavir    (although these medications have not been specifically studied with amprenavir, they may increase the serum concentration of amprenavir {01})


» Clozapine
Loratadine
Pimozide    (although these medications have not been specifically studied with amprenavir, amprenavir may increase the serum concentrations of these medications {01})


Dapsone or
Erythromycin or
Itraconazole    (although these medications have not been specifically studied with amprenavir, amprenavir may increase serum concentrations of these medications; erythromycin and itraconazole also may increase the serum concentration of amprenavir {01})


Delavirdine    (although delavirdine has not been specifically studied with amprenavir, it may increase the serum concentration of amprenavir {01})


Efavirenz or
Nevirapine    (these medications may decrease the serum concentration of amprenavir)


» HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, such as:
» Atorvastatin
» Cerivastatin
» Lovastatin
» Pravastatin
» Simvastatin    (although these medications have not been specifically studied with amprenavir, amprenavir may increase the serum concentrations of these medications, which may result in an increase in their activity or toxicity {01}{02}{03})


Medications metabolized by cytochrome P450 3A4, other    (amprenavir inhibits the CYP3A4 isoenzyme and may interfere with the metabolism of medications that are substrates, inhibitors, or inducers for this isoenzyme {01}{02}{03})


» Oral contraceptives    (although oral contraceptives have not been specifically studied with amprenavir, the potential for metabolic interactions exists that may reduce the efficacy of hormonal contraceptives; it is recommended that a method of barrier contraception be used as an alternate or additional form of birth control during therapy with amprenavir {01})


» Phenobarbital or
» Phenytoin or    (these medications induce the CYP3A4 isoenzyme and may decrease serum concentrations of amprenavir {01})


» Rifabutin    (amprenavir interferes with the metabolism of rifabutin and significantly increases rifabutin serum concentrations; it is recommended that the dose of rifabutin be reduced by at least half of the recommended dose; rifabutin decreases the AUC of amprenavir by 15%; patients should be monitored for neutropenia once a week and as clinically indicated if rifabutin is given concurrently with amprenavir {01})


» Rifampin    (rifampin reduces serum concentrations and AUC of amprenavir by about 90%; concurrent use is not recommended {01})


» Sildenafil    (although sildenafil has not been specifically studied with amprenavir, data from studies with other protease inhibitors suggest a potential for amprenavir to substantially increase serum concentrations of sildenafil with a resulting increase in sildenafil-associated adverse reactions, such as hypotension, visual changes, and priapism; a reduction in the dose of sildenafil should be considered {01})


» St. John's wort    (concurrent use with St. John's wort or any St. John's wort–containing product is not recommended because such use is expected to substantially decrease amprenavir concentrations and may result in loss of virological response and possible resistance to amprenavir)

{02}{03}
» Warfarin    (although warfarin has not been specifically studied with amprenavir, amprenavir may increase warfarin serum concentrations; the International Normalized Ratio (INR) should be monitored if warfarin is given concurrently with amprenavir {01})



Laboratory value alterations
The following have been selected on the basis of their potential clinical significance (possible effect in parentheses where appropriate)—not necessarily inclusive (» = major clinical significance):

With physiology/laboratory test values
Glucose, plasma and
Triglycerides, serum and
Cholesterol, serum    (concentrations may be increased {01})


Medical considerations/Contraindications
The medical considerations/contraindications included have been selected on the basis of their potential clinical significance (reasons given in parentheses where appropriate)— not necessarily inclusive (» = major clinical significance).


Except under special circumstances, this medication should not be used when the following medical problem exists:
» Hepatic failure{03} or
» Renal failure{03}    (because of its propylene glycol content, amprenavir oral solution is contraindicated in these patients{03})


Hypersensitivity to amprenavir{02}{03}
Risk-benefit should be considered when the following medical problems exist
Diabetes mellitus    (protease inhibitors may exacerbate diabetes; initiation or dose adjustment of insulin or oral hypoglycemic medications may be necessary {01})


Hemophilia    (spontaneous bleeding has been reported in patients with hemophilia types A and B treated with protease inhibitors; a causal relationship has not been established {01})


» Hepatic function impairment    (because amprenavir is primarily metabolized by the liver, dose reductions may be required {01})

    (amprenavir oral solution contains a large amount of propylene glycol;{03} patients with hepatic function impairment may have an increased risk of developing propylene glycol–associated side effects;{03} caution is recommended{03})


Hypersensitivity to sulfonamides{02}{03}    (amprenavir is a sulfonamide; although the potential for cross-sensitivity between other sulfonamides and amprenavir is unknown, patients with a known allergy to sulfonamides should be treated with caution{01}{02}{03})


» Renal function impairment{03}    (amprenavir oral solution contains a large amount of propylene glycol;{03} patients with renal function impairment may have an increased risk of developing propylene glycol–associated side effects;{03} caution is recommended{03})


Vitamin K deficiency    (it is possible that the high content of vitamin E in amprenavir dosage forms may delay blood coagulation in patients who are deficient in vitamin K due to anticoagulant therapy or malabsorption)



Patient monitoring
The following may be especially important in patient monitoring (other tests may be warranted in some patients, depending on condition; » = major clinical significance):

Blood glucose determinations    (development of hyperglycemia or diabetes may be associated with the use of protease inhibitors {01})


Blood coagulation times    (monitoring of blood coagulation times may be appropriate, particularly in patients with hemophilia or vitamin K deficiency)




Side/Adverse Effects

Note: The redistribution or accumulation of body fat, including central obesity, dorsocervical fat enlargement (buffalo hump), peripheral wasting, breast enlargement, and “cushingoid appearance” have been reported in patients on protease inhibitor therapy. A causal relationship between these events and use of protease inhibitors has not been confirmed. {01}

The following side/adverse effects have been selected on the basis of their potential clinical significance (possible signs and symptoms in parentheses where appropriate)—not necessarily inclusive:

Those indicating need for medical attention
Incidence more frequent
    
Hyperglycemia {01} (dry or itchy skin; fatigue ; increased hunger; increased thirst; increased urination)
    
skin rash {01}

Incidence less frequent
    
Mood disorders {01} (depression; mood or mental changes)
    
peripheral paresthesia (burning or prickling sensation in arms or legs)

Incidence rare
    
Diabetes mellitus {01} ( dry or itchy skin; fatigue; increased hunger ; increased thirst; increased urination ; unexplained weight loss)
    
dorsocervical fat enlargement {01} (buffalo hump)
    
Stevens-Johnson syndrome {01} (blistering, peeling, or loosening of skin and mucous membranes; fever; general feeling of discomfort or illness)



Those indicating need for medical attention only if they continue or are bothersome
Incidence more frequent
    
Gastrointestinal disturbances {01} (abdominal pain ; diarrhea; nausea; vomiting )
    
oral paresthesia (burning or prickling sensation around the mouth)





Overdose
For more information on the management of overdose or unintentional ingestion, contact a Poison Control Center (see Poison Control Center Listing).

Treatment of overdose
There is no known specific antidote for amprenavir overdose. It has not been determined whether amprenavir can be removed from the circulation by peritoneal dialysis or hemodialysis. Amprenavir oral solution contains large amounts of propylene glycol, and propylene glycol can be removed by hemodialysis.{03} {01}

Monitoring— Amprenavir Capsules: Patients should be monitored for signs of toxicity.{01}

Amprenavir Oral Solution: Because of the propylene glycol content, patients should be additionally monitored for signs and symptoms of acid-base abnormalities, with appropriate management.{03}

Supportive care—Standard supportive treatment should be provided as necessary.{01} Patients in whom intentional overdose is confirmed or suspected should be referred for psychiatric consultation.


Patient Consultation
As an aid to patient consultation, refer to Advice for the Patient, Amprenavir (Systemic) .
In providing consultation, consider emphasizing the following selected information (» = major clinical significance):

Before using this medication
»   Conditions affecting use, especially:
Sensitivity to amprenavir or sulfonamides

Pregnancy— Amprenavir oral solution is contraindicated in pregnant women because the large amount of propylene glycol contained in the formulation may cause toxicity in the fetus





Breast-feeding—Not recommended for HIV-infected mothers





Use in children— Amprenavir oral solution is contraindicated in infants and children up to 4 years of age

Other medications, especially amiodarone, antacids, astemizole, bepridil, carbamazepine, cisapride, clozapine, didanosine, dihydroergotamine, disulfiram, ergotamine, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, metronidazole, midazolam, oral contraceptives, phenobarbital, phenytoin, quinidine, rifabutin, rifampin, sildenafil, triazolam, tricyclic antidepressants, or warfarin
Other medical problems, especially diabetes mellitus, hemophilia, hepatic failure or hepatic function impairment, renal failure or renal function impairment, or vitamin K deficiency

Proper use of this medication
» Importance of not taking amprenavir with a high-fat meal

» Importance of not drinking alcoholic beverages while taking amprenavir oral solution

» Importance of taking amprenavir in combination with other antiretroviral medications

» Importance of not taking more medication than prescribed; importance of not discontinuing amprenavir without checking with physician

» Compliance with therapy

» Importance of not missing doses and of taking at evenly spaced times

Not sharing medication with others

» Proper dosing
Capsules—Taking as soon as possible; not taking if almost time for next dose; not doubling doses

Oral solution—If dose is missed by less than 4 hours, taking missed dose immediately; if dose is missed by more than 4 hours, skipping missed dose and taking next dose at regularly scheduled time

» Proper storage

Precautions while using this medication
» Not taking any other medications (prescription or nonprescription) without first consulting your physician

» Using alternate or additional contraceptive measures if oral contraceptives are taken during amprenavir therapy because the efficacy of oral contraceptives may be reduced with use of amprenavir

For patients with diabetes: checking with physician if changes in blood glucose concentrations occur

» Not taking supplemental vitamin E while using amprenavir

» Regular visits to physician to check progress and for blood tests and monitoring of blood glucose concentrations

» Being aware that amprenavir therapy does not reduce the risk of transmitting HIV to others through sexual contact or contamination through blood


Side/adverse effects
Signs of potential side effects, especially hyperglycemia, skin rash, mood disorders, peripheral paresthesia, diabetes mellitus, dorsocervical fat enlargement, and Stevens-Johnson syndrome

Redistribution or accumulation of body fat may occur


General Dosing Information
Amprenavir dosage forms contain high amounts of vitamin E. At the recommended daily adult dose the vitamin E content is 1744 IU. Each mL of the oral solution contains 46 IU of vitamin E. The Reference Daily Intake for vitamin E is 30 IU for adults and approximately 10 IU for children. The effects of long-term, high-dose vitamin E administration in humans has not been determined.{01}

For oral solution dosage form
Because of the risk of propylene glycol toxicity and the lack of information on chronic exposure to large amounts of propylene glycol, amprenavir oral solution should be used only when the capsules or other protease inhibitors are not considered to be viable therapeutic alternatives.{03} Additionally, patients should be switched from the oral solution dosage form to the capsules dosage form as soon as they are able to take the capsules.{03}

Patients being treated with amprenavir oral solution should be closely monitored for propylene glycol–associated side effects including hemolysis, hyperosmolality, lactic acidosis, renal toxicity, seizures, stupor, and tachycardia.{03}

Diet/Nutrition
Amprenavir may be taken with or without food; however, administration with a high-fat meal reduces absorption and should be avoided.{01}

Bioequivalence information
Capsules and oral solution are not interchangeable on a milligram-per-milligram basis.{01}{02}{03} Amprenavir oral solution is 14% less bioavailable than the capsules.{03}


Oral Dosage Forms

Note: Amprenavir capsules and oral solution are not interchangeable on a mg-per-mg basis.{02}{03}


AMPRENAVIR CAPSULES

Usual adult and adolescent dose
Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection
Adults, adolescents 17 years of age and older, and adolescents 13 through 16 years of age who weigh 50 kg or more: Oral, 1200 mg (eight 150-mg capsules) two times a day in combination with other antiretroviral agents.{01}

Note: Dose adjustments should be considered for patients with hepatic insufficiency. For patients with a Child-Pugh score ranging from 5 to 8, the recommended dose is 450 mg two times a day. For patients with a Child-Pugh score of 9 to 12, the recommended dose is 300 mg two times a day.{01}



Usual pediatric dose
Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection
Children up to 4 years of age: Safety and efficacy have not been established.

Children 4 to 13 years of age and children 13 through 16 years of age who weigh less than 50 kg: Oral, 20 mg per kg of body weight two times a day or 15 mg per kg of body weight three times a day, in combination with other antiretroviral agents. {01}{02}

Adolescents 13 through 16 years of age who weigh 50 kg or more and adolescents 17 years of age or older: See Usual adult and adolescent dose . {01}


Usual pediatric prescribing limits
2400 mg. {01}

Strength(s) usually available
U.S.—


50 mg (Rx) [Agenerase (d-alpha tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate [TPGS]) (polyethylene glycol 400 [PEG 400] 246.7 mg) (propylene glycol 19 mg){02}]


150 mg (Rx) [Agenerase (d-alpha tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate [TPGS] [equivalent to 109 IU of vitamin E]) ( polyethylene glycol 400 [PEG 400] 740 mg) (propylene glycol 57 mg){02}]

Packaging and storage:
Store at controlled room temperature of 25 °C (77 °F). Do not refrigerate. {01}

Auxiliary labeling:
   • Continue medicine for full time of treatment.
   • Do not take other medication without physician's advice.


AMPRENAVIR ORAL SOLUTION

Note: Amprenavir capsules and oral solution are not interchangeable on a mg-per-mg basis.{01}


Usual adult and adolescent dose
Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection
Adults, adolescents 17 years of age and older, and adolescents 13 through 16 years of age who weigh 50 kg or more: Oral, 1400 mg twice a day.
{03}
Note: Dose adjustments should be considered for patients with hepatic function impairment.{03} For patients with a Child-Pugh score ranging from 5 to 8, the recommended dose is 513 mg (34 mL) two times a day.{03} For patients with a Child-Pugh score of 9 to 12, the recommended dose is 342 mg (23 mL) two times a day.{03}



Usual pediatric dose
Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection
Children up to 4 years of age: Use is contraindicated.{03}

Children 4 to 12 years of age and adolescents 13 through 16 years of age who weigh less than 50 kg: Oral, 22.5 mg (1.5 mL) per kg of body weight two times a day or 17 mg (1.1 mL) per kg of body weight three times a day, in combination with other antiretroviral agents.{01}{03}

Note: Dose adjustments should be considered for patients with hepatic function impairment. {03} However, use of amprenavir oral solution has not been studied in children with hepatic function impairment.{03}



Usual pediatric prescribing limits
2800 mg.{01}

Strength(s) usually available
U.S.—


15 mg per mL (Rx) [Agenerase (acesulfame potassium) (artificial grape bubble gum flavor) (citric acid [anhydrous]) (d-alpha tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate [TPGS] [equivalent to 46 IU of vitamin E]) (menthol) ( natural peppermint flavor) (polyethylene glycol 400 [PEG 400] 170 mg) (propylene glycol 550 mg) (saccharin sodium) (sodium chloride ) (sodium citrate [dihydrate]) ( sodium hydroxide and/or diluted hydrochloric acid){03}]

Packaging and storage:
Store at controlled room temperature of 25 °C (77 °F). Do not refrigerate. {01}

Auxiliary labeling:
   • Continue medicine for full time of treatment.
   • Do not take other medication without physician's advice.



Developed: 06/15/1999
Revised: 02/10/2003



References
  1. Agenerase package insert (Glaxo Wellcome—US), Rev 4/99, Rec 4/99.
  1. Product information: Agenerase® Capsules, amprenavir. Glaxo Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC (PI revised 1/2001) PI reviewed 3/2001.
  1. Product information: Agenerase® Oral Solution, amprenavir. Glaxo Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC (PI revised 1/2001) PI reviewed 3/2001.
  1. Product information: Agenerase® Capsules, amprenavir. GlaxoSmithKline, Research Triangle Park, NC (PI revised 10/2002) PI reviewed 01/2003.
  1. Product information: Agenerase® Oral Solution, amprenavir. GlaxoSmithKline, Research Triangle Park, NC (PI revised 10/2002) PI reviewed 01/2003.
  1. Feinberg, William, R.Ph.,M.B.A., 2002 Update Pharmacy Perspective: Acquired Immune Deficiency Disease. CE PRN®2002; 13-18.
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