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kittie
  1. #1
    lynnef is offline New Member
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    Dec 2010
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    Default kittie

    Hi,
    I am a new member, we have 2 female indoor cats, Casey is a longhaired hymalayan and is 11 yrs old..Kittie is 10 or 11 yrs.
    They are both spayed..kittie is peeing a real lot of clear, sticky and very foul smelling pee/water, it looks like water. she has started going by the door, once in a while, and when she goes in the litter box, she "pees" for 76 seconds.
    when she was in heat and we got her fixed, she gained a lot of weight, then one day we looked at her and realized she had lost the weight..
    We are on a fixed income. I wondered if there is anything we can do for her at home?
    Thanx for any info, lynnef

  2. #2
    fairygodmother is offline New Member
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    Jan 2010
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    Default

    It could be that Kitty is suffering from diabetes.

    Diabetes is not as common in cats as it is in dogs, but it does happen and generally in older cats.

    The fact that Kitty is peeing so much is an obvious indicator that she is drinking plenty. This can be a symptom of diabetes, together with the urine being clear (due to dilution of drinking a lot) and sticky (due to an increase in glucose in the urine).

    Urine should not contain any glucose, so a simple test is a urine dipstick, any colour change that indicates positive glucose in the urine should be investigated. If the urine also contains any level of ketones, this must be treated immediately as this is a sign of ketoacidosis.

    Sometimes diabetes in cats can be transient which means that the diabetes can settle itself following insulin treatment and need not be a lifelong requirement.

    Her dramatic weight loss can also be a symptom of the illness, is she weak on her back legs? Does she have a wobbly gait when she walks?
    Muscle wastage is common in cats with the illness but this could be something else, not necessarily diabetes.

    This is only a thought so don't be overly concerned until you've looked into it, but a simple urine test is the first step.

    Good luck!

  3. #3
    lynnef is offline New Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    2

    Smile kittie

    Quote Originally Posted by fairygodmother View Post
    It could be that Kitty is suffering from diabetes.

    Diabetes is not as common in cats as it is in dogs, but it does happen and generally in older cats.

    The fact that Kitty is peeing so much is an obvious indicator that she is drinking plenty. This can be a symptom of diabetes, together with the urine being clear (due to dilution of drinking a lot) and sticky (due to an increase in glucose in the urine).

    Urine should not contain any glucose, so a simple test is a urine dipstick, any colour change that indicates positive glucose in the urine should be investigated. If the urine also contains any level of ketones, this must be treated immediately as this is a sign of ketoacidosis.

    Sometimes diabetes in cats can be transient which means that the diabetes can settle itself following insulin treatment and need not be a lifelong requirement.

    Her dramatic weight loss can also be a symptom of the illness, is she weak on her back legs? Does she have a wobbly gait when she walks?
    Muscle wastage is common in cats with the illness but this could be something else, not necessarily diabetes.

    This is only a thought so don't be overly concerned until you've looked into it, but a simple urine test is the first step.

    Good luck!
    thank you, fairygodmother, appreciate it, is there anything I could give her at home?

  4. #4
    fairygodmother is offline New Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    9

    Default

    No, not really.

    An initial trip to the vet is best to diagnose the true problem. If it is diabetes (only a thought) then the vet needs to advise you. Sometimes it can be controlled with diet, usually a high fibre food that controls the glucose levels in the body by keeping them from peaking and troughing throughout the day when the cat eats.

    I know vets bills can be astronomical, but you need a firm diagnosis before going ahead with any "DIY" treatments at home!!
    Good luck.

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