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blue tablet, small, R on one side, 031 reverse
  1. #1
    njdoodle is offline New Member
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    Default blue tablet, small, R on one side, 031 reverse

    Identify

  2. #2
    ironchef is offline New Member
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    benzodiazepine. used to treat nervousness,"panic attacks"
    this is a milder form of valium. habit forming.

    hope this helps. ironchef.

  3. #3
    lordnine is offline Member
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    Generic Name Alprazolam Tab 1 MG
    Imprint Code 031 / a logo -> R <-
    Color blue
    Shape round


    Kyle - Pharmacy Tech and Rockstar!

  4. #4
    robo is offline Moderator
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    That's right

    This pill is ALPRAZOLAM 1 MG
    a generic version of Xanax
    Imprint Code 031 / R (Purepac logo)
    Description blue, round, scored tablet

    Info at http://www.drugs.com/alprazolam.html

  5. #5
    med_pharm_wiz is offline New Member
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    Wink RE: Small blue scored tablet with 031 and R on reverse side. Heres New Stuff

    Quote Originally Posted by ironchef View Post
    benzodiazepine. used to treat nervousness,"panic attacks"
    this is a milder form of valium. habit forming.

    hope this helps. ironchef.
    XANAX (generically alprazolam) 1 mg for sure, manufactured by Purepac if it is a small blue scored tablet with 031 on one side and the funny looking R on the reverse side. The only clarification. From a psychopharmacologic standpoint, Xanax is in a subclass called triazolobenzodiazepines, a term that Upjohn plausibly came up with in order toi distinguish their product over rival Valium (diazepam) and especially Ativan (lorazepam), it latest competitor at the time. One must NOT under any circumstances classify Xanax as a milder form of Valium because it simply is not true. It not only has a shorter half-life which means that a patient dependant on Xanax will have a more precipitous withdrawal and onset of withdrawal is quicker. Additionally, Xanax is classified as a "high potency" benzo (remember, be classy -its triazolobenzodiazepine) which means that it binds much tighter to the GABA receptors (thats how everythihng from Librium to Tranxene, Valium to Ativan work: by binding to the Gamma amino butyric acid receptor) and that leads to one feeling chilled out buzzed feeling. Valium has more profound muscle relaxant effects so you will see doctors use that in acutely anxious patients with lots of muscle tension. MY MESSAGE TO YOU ALL IS THIS: Xanax, when used in low doses for periods of time less than one month is perfectly warranted, with the duration of therapy being as short as possible. Xanax IS the most highly addictive of all the benzo's. Following the usual tapering schedule to get off Xanax of reducing the daily dose by ten percent every week is way too steep. I ask every one of you who has been on Xanax for more than 5 or 6 months and have tried to quit. IT is exceedingly rare for one to do it alone. A skilled substance abuse specialist who will "work with you" at your own pace and you feel comfortable with is key. I also challenge any physicians or pharmacists and review your records of just how many tims that you have seen a patient successfully wean off long term, moderate to high dose Xanax. Xanax is an excellent drug when used properly, but when it came out it was way overprescribed and there is an entire "culture" of Xanan and Ativan addicts out there and in most cases it is not their fault, they were hust following the advice of their physician. I've witnessed quite a bit of luck by bridging the patient to and equivalent dose of another longER acting high potency benzo called Klonopin (clonazepam). Some even try to switch from Xanax to an equipotent dose of Valium but sometimes it doesn't work and their are breakthrough withdrawal symptoms. Once the patient is stable on the equipotent dose of Klonopin, it may be titrated down, with high emphasis on involvement in a 12 step program or counselling. I am passionate about this topic and could not accept the false statement that
    Xanax is a milder Xanax. Maybe Xanax subjectively to the patient seems milder than Valium because they love the euphoric "kick" but aren't glued to the couch due to the moderate muscle relaxant effects. I welcome any and all feedback and am willing to try to answer any question. I am a newcomer as a result of reading the earlier post. I might next decide to write on appropriate tapering of Suboxone in opiate addiction,l another one of my pet peeves, because their manufacturer, like that of Xanax, does not make a tablet dose strenght low enough in order to get accurate microdoses when it is most important near the end of the drug taper and the patient actually gets off the med for good. I ripped this one out without editing. Please comment to me because I;m sure there is a lot of interest in this area.

  6. #6
    Cats Meow is offline Banned
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    Excellent, very informative post! I for one very much look forward to reading future posts from you, I hope there's more to come.
    Cats

  7. #7
    med_pharm_wiz is offline New Member
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    Default You Are Most Welcome

    Quote Originally Posted by Cats Meow View Post
    Excellent, very informative post! I for one very much look forward to readifuture posts from you, I hope there's more to come.
    Cats
    Hello Cats Meow,

    Since that was my first post, you can imagine how cool that was when you left a remark so quickly. Go ahead, make my day, Ask me a question, I dare yoU

    Dave

  8. #8
    Cats Meow is offline Banned
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    Okay Dave, it's funny, it's usually me answering the questions, not asking them! There is something maybe you can shed some light on, can you tell me what it is exactly that Buprenorphine and Methadone do to ravage pain receptors so viciously that makes even very slow taper and low mg drop offs to cold turkey so excruciatingly difficult and painful in the withdrawal process? I understand a long slow taper down to microdosing is crucial for success and partially reduces the w/d symptoms, but I'm more interested in what the difference is that it does at a say 1-2 mg drop, compared to other opioids, why is Bup and Meth so devastating to receptors, or is it more then just the receptors at fault?

    Please explain, I look forward to your academician response.
    Thanks again
    Cats

  9. #9
    Asashi is offline New Member
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    Along with Cat's question, I've been having a small debate with some co-workers. I can only imagine that the w/d off methadone is unbelievable. However, one co-worker tells me (not by experience) that once you're at 15-10mgs, it's all in your mind and you don't need to continue to taper. In essence, he says you should be able to stop cold turkey at 15mg. I don't agree with this, and personally this is when I see people have the most trouble. Who is "right"?
    I may be a good guesser, but never take my opinion or estimations over the informed information a doctor can offer you.

  10. #10
    med_pharm_wiz is offline New Member
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    Default Med_Pharm_Wiz (Dave on the run)

    Hi There,

    I'll be able to give you an answer on that question Cats Meow, but I'm on the run and want to give proper attention to your inquiry. We ARE talking life/death decisions here you know and I don't want to mess you up. Please give me whatever history with timelines/dosages, and I'll get back to you with a customized taper which WILL work for you. Make no mistake, one way or another, you gotta pay the piper, but its NOT as bad as it sounds. TTYL. I don't know if personal emails are allowed, and I would provide mine if you think it may help.

    Quote Originally Posted by Cats Meow View Post
    Okay Dave, it's funny, it's usually me answering the questions, not asking them! There is something maybe you can shed some light on, can you tell me what it is exactly that Buprenorphine and Methadone do to ravage pain receptors so viciously that makes even very slow taper and low mg drop offs to cold turkey so excruciatingly difficult and painful in the withdrawal process? I understand a long slow taper down to microdosing is crucial for success and partially reduces the w/d symptoms, but I'm more interested in what the difference is that it does at a say 1-2 mg drop, compared to other opioids, why is Bup and Meth so devastating to receptors, or is it more then just the receptors at fault?

    Please explain, I look forward to your academician response.
    Thanks again
    Cats

  11. #11
    Cats Meow is offline Banned
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    LOL, I don't take either drug, or any drug for that matter, my question is purely informational, for my own selfish interests.
    Take your time, it's not exactly an easy question, a good answer is worth waiting for.
    Thanks

  12. #12
    med_pharm_wiz is offline New Member
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    Default The Co-Worker is WRONG

    Quote Originally Posted by Asashi View Post
    Along with Cat's question, I've been having a small debate with some co-workers. I can only imagine that the w/d off methadone is unbelievable. However, one co-worker tells me (not by experience) that once you're at 15-10mgs, it's all in your mind and you don't need to continue to taper. In essence, he says you should be able to stop cold turkey at 15mg. I don't agree with this, and personally this is when I see people have the most trouble. Who is "right"?
    Dear Asashi,

    Most people cannot just "jump off" I call it, at 10-15 mg/day without withdrawal symptoms that will eventually get them back to using. I see a lot of people who just switch over to and bomb themselves with muscle relaxant, benzodiazepines, alcohol, marijuanna, whatever it takes to snow themselves into enough of a stupor to not notice the withdrawal as much. I know one man who says he keeps 2 of the 8mg Suboxone handy so that if he needs to go to jail he can get off of his >>>>>> habit. BALONEY. If you are reading this CatsMeow, ur next, its almost 3 am and I'm exhausted.

    Dave

  13. #13
    John Weelsen is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cats Meow View Post
    Okay Dave, it's funny, it's usually me answering the questions, not asking them! There is something maybe you can shed some light on, can you tell me what it is exactly that Buprenorphine and Methadone do to ravage pain receptors so viciously that makes even very slow taper and low mg drop offs to cold turkey so excruciatingly difficult and painful in the withdrawal process? I understand a long slow taper down to microdosing is crucial for success and partially reduces the w/d symptoms like xanax, but I'm more interested in what the difference is that it does at a say 1-2 mg drop, compared to other opioids, why is Bup and Meth so devastating to receptors, or is it more then just the receptors at fault?

    Please explain, I look forward to your academician response.
    Thanks again
    Cats
    I think that is not Methadone. It's look like Xanax as i think.

  14. #14
    med_pharm_wiz is offline New Member
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    Default I'm with you on this one Cats Meow

    Quote Originally Posted by John Weelsen View Post
    I think that is not Methadone. It's look like Xanax as i think.
    That is most definitely generic alprazolam 1.0 mg (ie., Xanax), the "triazolobenzodazepine." Its just a hopped up version of diazepam (Valium) or lorazepam (Ativan) and the pill itself does resemble a methadone 10 mg but is thicker and has a smaller diameter. Benzo's, and this includes Xanax are used to control ACUTE anxiety and some of them, like diazepam (Valium), have strong enough muscle relaxant properties that they can come in handy when formal muscle relaxants like methocarbamol (Robaxin), carisoprodol (SOMA), or cyclobenzaprine (Flexeril) are not available for backaches, sprains etcetera. I wouldn't want to find either of these in my daughter's purse. The 1 mg Xanax is a lot stronger buzz effect than a single methadone 10 mg, but the withdrawal from chronic Xanax use is very scary and dangerous as well. Whether Xanax or Methadone, and this gets into my response to Cats Meow: It all has to do with two important properties related to how many drugs work. One property is how strongly they bind to the receptor. Benzodiazepines bind to and render effects at the GABA receptor (gamm-amino butyric acid). Normally, chemicals in your body bind to and stimulate GABA, Benzo's like Ativan, Valium, the "triazolo" Benzo Xanax and, yup, you may have guessed it alcohol get the binding to the GABA receptors part right, but instead of stimulating it, they effectively block and protect the receptor from your own body's stimulatory chemicals. NET RESULT: CNS depression, anxiolysis amd there you have it with the Benzodiazepines effects. With methadone and Suboxone, the target receptor is the Opioid receptors in the brain. Normally, the brain's own opioids, endorphins and enkephalins, bind to these receptors and they have some effect in regulating mood. >>>>>> and vicodin bind to these and cause the buzz and euphoria. Methadone and Suboxone both bind to opioid receptors strongly, more strongly than the recreational drugs themselves. The other property drugs have at receptors is how potent their stimulatory or inhibitory effects are. Well you may have guessed, methdone and Suboxone actually bind to and displace narcotic opioids and that has something todo with why you get some nasty effects until you have found a stable dose and subsequent desired blood blood level. There is a difference between how methadone and Suboxone work. If anyone is interested, give me a holler, because I got to get up and get going with my day. Hope you all have a great weekend.
    Dave

  15. #15
    Cats Meow is offline Banned
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    Thanks Dave, but I already knew all of that. I was hoping to get more into the chemistry and bio-mechanics of the receptor vis-à-vis Bup and Meth. Thanks for trying, I realize this may not be your forte'.
    Cats

  16. #16
    med_pharm_wiz is offline New Member
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    Default Sorry About That

    Quote Originally Posted by Cats Meow View Post
    Thanks Dave, but I already knew all of that. I was hoping to get more into the chemistry and bio-mechanics of the receptor vis-à-vis Bup and Meth. Thanks for trying, I realize this may not be your forte'.
    Cats
    Hi Cats,

    I'm still getting used to this whole Drugs.com site and was responding to another "thread" and really did kind of cop out trying to kill two birds with one stone. I have been WAY too busy lately. I promise to try to get a better answer. Lots, if not most of this information is theoretical and I know you deserve better because you seem very sophisticated. This may seem strange, but I think I know who you are. Is your first initial the same as mine (D)? And let me get this straight, you wanted to know not just mechanism of action, but why Methadone, opioids, Suboxone cause similar but at the same time different effects when withdrawn or substituted for each other, is that it? I'm so sorry, but I have to admit that I lost the original question. Please re-post your question, with specifics (examples may help) and I'll tell you what I know and not pretend I know it all. Nice hearing from you!
    Regards,
    Dave

  17. #17
    Cats Meow is offline Banned
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    Default med_pharm_wiz (Dave)

    med_pharm_wiz (Dave), hello again, no, my first initial is not "D". I really couldn't frame my question any better then I did in post number 15 or 8 in this thread, just scroll up to re-read it. I'm glad you're contemplating an answer for me still, I purposely asked a very difficult question, you dared me!

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